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Toyota on the mend?

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,317
    It does have an Aztek disjointedness to it.

    Hilarious article:

    "Albaisa states that the essence of the Juke "captures the pure life of a 30-something year-old guy." The vehicle is aimed at a younger demographic of new car buyer and Nissan's goal was to turn lifestyle elements into design features. The interior is supposed to be reminiscent of a person wearing a wetsuit while the front end is intended to invoke visions of a rally car."

    Are we sure this guy really isn't from marketing? The "pure life"? WTH? A rally car?
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    I hope the interior doesn't smell anything like my old wetsuits did.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,159
    ...As globalization dumbs down the developed world...

    I don't think globalization is what is dumbing down the developed world. Our sitting at the top too long, getting lazy, and trying to support a huge chunk of population on the backs of those who work hard is dumbing us down... what are the statistics on how many US kids finish high school? And how does that compare to 40 years ago? And how does THAT relate to globalization?
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Manson, WAPosts: 7,243
    edited October 2010
    in Australia.

    image

    "G" is short for Gazoo.

    Drool! :P

    For length comparisons, this car is shorter than a Chevrolet Cobalt Coupe.

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,317
    None of that matters when those who have it all can simply exploit serfdom labor in criminal states (who steal the intellectual property and innovation of the "lazy") to increase their undeserved profit margins. It's not really trickling down, is it? As the socio-economic gap continues to grow, those education issues aren't going to get better either. So yeah, in a way it relates directly to the negative consequences of the great race to the bottom aka globalization.

    But continue to muster up a defense everytime this devolutionary status quo is criticized.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,317
    Wasn't the Element marketed towards the wetsuit crowd? And ended up being loved by 50-something dog owners. Let's see how Nissan product positioning works.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,159
    As the socio-economic gap continues to grow, those education issues aren't going to get better either. So yeah, in a way it relates directly to the negative consequences of the great race to the bottom aka globalization.

    OK, now I know how globalization is dumbing-down the developed countries. It's education issues. :surprise:
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    The Element is nice for the surfers because they can change clothes at the beach by standing up through the sunroof. Beats the towel shimmy I guess.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaPosts: 31,224
    If a surfer has any class he changes in his Prevost.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    edited October 2010
    Heh, it's hard enough to find on-street parking in the coastal neighborhoods as it is without cruising around in a motorhome.

    Really need a Smart Car with a rack for the tonier neighborhoods around Scripps. (RapidMag.com)

    I'm no good at ID'ing sedans - this may be a Toyota (in keeping with the topic). Still easier to park than a Winnebago. Just substitute boards for 'yaks. (couple more fun ones).
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    The rally car reference sort of made me LOL also.

    It's as if they've never seen a WRC event, even on TV.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited October 2010
    Wasn't the Element marketed towards the wetsuit crowd? And ended up being loved by 50-something dog owners.

    It was - early ads had surfers popping their heads out of the rear moonroof to change in to their wet suits. What a strange place for a moonroof, too!

    I realize a lot of people feel strongly (mostly negative) about the Element, but I will point out that it was a very successful product for Honda - all sales were incremental because it never cannibalized the CR-V it was based on.

    That's incredible if you think about it for a minute. It cost them almost NOTHING to build, since it's a CR-V clone, yet it sold well for several years. It's old now, and fading, but the CR-V actually became the best selling SUV after the Element was introduced. Ironic.

    So call it ugly, love it, hate it, whatever - there's no arguing the Element was a success for Honda.

    It would be like Mercedes coming out with the E-class based CLS without ever cannibalizing E-class sales, and then the E- taking over the segment. Unheard of.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    That Smart Car will roll over forwards if the owner jams the brakes suddenly. LOL

    The sedan in the 2nd pic is a Neon.

    I'm no photo-chop pro, but I think it's chopped.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,317
    Yeah, well to be fair, I never claimed the Element was not a sales success - indeed it cost almost nothing to make, so it was in the black early on. But from a marketing or product positioning standpoint, it was a hilarious failure, as is almost any car marketed towards the "young and hip". I don't hate any hate for the car itself, it serves a purpose...but in my area they do tend to be driven by the types who merge onto a highway at 38mph.

    What you describe of the CLS is pretty much what happened...I don't think anyone at MB ever thought it would go over so well or spawn imitators.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I doubt Honda cared much who actually bought it, as many buyers as it found (without hurting its siblings). As they say, you can sell a young man's car (in terms of image) to a old man, but not the other way around.

    Ironically two friends of mine own them - and they married ... each other! Just had their first children, a twin boy and girl. Before that she had dogs, too.

    CLS is a success, too, then.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,726
    edited October 2010
    interested to learn what the base price of this thing will be?

    2011 Lexus CT 200h - Driving Impressions
    Lexus’ entry-level hybrid, take two.


    Driving the car is an enthusiast-friendly experience. In Sport mode, the CT responds surprisingly well to corners with predictable mild understeer that’s easily detectable through the steering wheel.


    http://www.roadandtrack.com/tests/impressions/2011-lexus-ct-200h

    And that, from a car with a Lexus badge, which looks like a Matrix, and has the guts of a Prius! Apart from the fact that it will be (I'm sure) automatic-only, I find myself quite interested, particularly if this has a starting price under $30K, which I figure it must.

    How much does the Camry Hybrid clone, er I mean HS250H, cost? This would surely have to have a starting price that is roughly the same.

    Edit....I just checked the Lexus website, and the base price of the HS250H is $34K?? Holy crap! They are asking $34 grand or more for a Camry Hybrid with a Lexus badge??? No wonder I see so few of these on the roads.

    If they are thinking of asking more than $30K as a base price for this CT200, they are out of their minds. I'm sure they won't sell many in that case.

    2014 Mini Cooper (stick shift of course), 2016 Camry hybrid, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (keeping the stick alive)

  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    I'm no photo-chop pro, but I think it's chopped.

    I bet it's real, or should be. Just typical of what a bunch of boaters would do running shuttle. And since destination boating got popular a few years back, every boater needs two or three kayaks to run various play spots on a river (getting as bad as golf with all those clubs). So all the paddlers for those boats could conceivably get in that one car.

    I was careful never to put more than 4 canoes and a couple of kayaks on my racks. Rarely more than three boats on my Tercel sedan. ;)
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Manson, WAPosts: 7,243
    edited October 2010
    I'm lowering my standards and deciding to...be open to the $25,000 idea for either a Scion FT-86 or a Toyota FR-S. Yikes. I've been bitten by the Toyota FT-86 idea.

    image

    If I can snag one of these pups with a 6-speed in this Japanese "monkeyback red" I'll grab it up like a hot apple fritter and Starbuck's French Roast. This is gonna be a fun chase.

    I mean, can I really expect Toyota/Scion ta build this car for $21,000 for the content included? I don't know if I can. What's $4,000 more, eh? :shades:

    Pop The Tragically Hip's 'Live Between Us' in the player and let's party. Gonna head south to Arizona and check up on our house down there in my new Scion FR-S, with 6-speeds, power w's, l's and m's, A/C, kickin' stereo with 10" subwoofer in the trunk and red paint.

    My '08 Lancer GTS has foglights and a sunroof but has an automatic CVT tranny. I can live with the Scion FR-S base 6-speed (manual is always cheaper, see where I'm headin' here) package that doesn't have the foglights and sunroof amenities included. Yessa. :blush:

    I think Toyota is just testing the waters on this $25,000 thing. Seeing the reaction. I'm starting to think that I'll entertain the idea of just paying the $25,000 for this car. Stay tuned.

    image

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    edited October 2010
    "Why rebels and insurgent groups the world over love the Toyota Hilux pickup as much as their AK-47s."

    "An experiment conducted by British TV show Top Gear in 2006 offers one explanation. The show’s producers bought an 18-year-old Hilux diesel with 190,000 miles on the odometer for $1,500. They then crashed it into a tree, submerged it in the ocean for five hours, dropped it from about 10 feet, tried to crush it under an RV, drove it through a portable building, hit it with a wrecking ball, and set it on fire. Finally they placed it on top of a 240-foot tower block that was then destroyed in a controlled demolition. When they dug it out of the rubble, all it took to get it running again was hammers, wrenches, and WD-40. They didn’t even need spare parts."

    Guerrilla Trucks (Newsweek)
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