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Buying American Cars What Does It Mean?

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  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    I bought a new Carmine Red 1994 Cadillac DeVille in November 1993. Drove it for 8 years and 96K+ miles and traded it for a new 2002 Cadillac Seville STS. I'd say I was satisfied enough with Cadillac to follow it up with another purchase. Funny he brought up the Ford Probe, Eagle Talon, and Honda Prelude. None of those cars were remotely on my radar at the time and all strike me as being distinctly "chick cars."
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    I'd hope a well-off middle-aged guy could buy a Corvette. A Prelude seems to be more the car a young, freshly-minted Staples manager would drive.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    Shoot, try FINDING a 1972 Toyota Corona, at least around here! They all collapsed into piles of iron oxide dust over 30 years ago! The only way a Corona could've survived a Northeast winter is by hibernating in an oil bath.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    edited August 2011
    I'd say I was satisfied enough with Cadillac to follow it up with another purchase. Funny he brought up the Ford Probe, Eagle Talon, and Honda Prelude. None of those cars were remotely on my radar at the time and all strike me as being distinctly "chick cars."

    Well if we're going to be "stereotyping". Back in the 90's I used to autocross. Talons, Probes, Mr2s, Miatas, GTIs, Neons and other "chick" cars were what you wanted (GM cars outside of a vette or camaro were rare). A Cadillac is what you'd see at the pharmacy drive thru picking up little blue pills;) Back then a Cadillac on an autocross course would have been hilarious to watch and probably hazardous to those watching.

    But those "chick" cars were for those who liked driving involvement. Neither my wife or I drove a car with an auto transmission until kids came along and our needs changed.

    A turbocharged AWD Talon TSI was a beast of a car, they were tough to beat on an autocross coarse and they'd eat up a Mustang or Camaro. Probe GT's were great handling FWD cars. They MR2 would kill the occasional Fiero that dared to show up and could run the whole season without falling apart, unlike a Fiero.

    I miss being part of SCCA Solo II. It was a blast to talk cars with a variety of people and actually watch drivers and cars compete with each other. Maybe someday I'll do it again. It would give me an excuse to buy another "chick" car.

    Actually, I'd probably get something like a Mustang, they aren't the best autocross cars, but they're a blast to try to keep under control on a tight autocross course.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    They all collapsed into piles of iron oxide dust over 30 years ago! The only way a Corona could've survived a Northeast winter is by hibernating in an oil bath.

    I don't know much about 70's asian cars. But I do know what you say about the Corona can also be said about a lot of domestics from the 70's. Fords rusted horribly back then. My dad's 73 Torino was completely rusted out by 78. Lots of bad cars in the 70's.
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,625
    My idea of the Nova was my Bro's '66, which he popped in a 327 out to 330 CI.

    375 horsies in a 2,600 lb. box was fun back in the day! Sold it for $3,000 in 1999.

    Otherwise, the 350 Nova as well as 396 were the gold standard of compact cars! :shades:

    Regards,
    OW
  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,311
    It would depend on trim level. The hot versions of the DSM cars and Probe were definitely not chick cars (although I had an eccentric old woman college professor around 1996 who had a mint early Probe turbo) - but the 4cyl slushbox models were definitely chick cars. I think the Probe that belonged to the mother of a high school friend of mine even had whitewall tires - silver with a burgundy interior and an auto, definite middle aged woman car. Prelude on the other hand, always seemed like something for either a middle aged secretary or a spoiled high school girl.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,938
    The first Preludes I remember seeing were usually driven by thin, well-dressed guys with lots of mousse in their hair. You know, the kind that make you want to just slap them.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 9,661
    The problem with the transplants is that they are getting too Americanized - focus on cost cutting, generic and safe designs and short term financials.

    That might be because there's too many Americans out there that either can't tell or don't care about the differences between a Lexus ES and a Camry, or a VW GTI and Audi A3. If everyone opts for the cheaper plastics and build, then what is the incentive to make higher quality stuff?
    Toy '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD, Commuter '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6 Turbo FWD, Wife's '17 VW Golf All-Track SE 4-Motion AWD
  • fintailfintail Posts: 43,311
    Out here they bought lowline 3ers, today they lease base model 3ers and A4s.

    Actually, now that I think of it, I knew a guy in high school who had one of those first gen Preludes, the tiny ones that were more like a Civic coupe. It had belonged to his mother beforehand.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    but the 4cyl slushbox models were definitely chick cars.

    True, no different than a 4cyl Mustang, though the Probe had a much better powertrain than the rock shaker 2.3 in the Mustang. IIRC, the Probe used a 2.0L Mazda 4cyl (far more rewarding to drive than any domestically sourced 4 cylinder at the time).

    My wife had a '94 Probe SE for a while (basically same body cladding as a GT sans v6), though it had a 5 speed manual. It was a good car while she had it. Reasonably peppy and fun to drive and it was reasonably priced.

    Prelude on the other hand, always seemed like something for either a middle aged secretary or a spoiled high school girl.

    Even a base Prelude was a relatively expensive car. Not to many entry level young people could afford one.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,159
    That might be because there's too many Americans out there that either can't tell or don't care about the differences between a Lexus ES and a Camry, or a VW GTI and Audi A3. If everyone opts for the cheaper plastics and build, then what is the incentive to make higher quality stuff?

    With the success of the "cheaper" Jetta, it seems apparent that size at a low price does best in this country. Which is why that has been the D3 model for quite a while. Myself, as a person who likes higher quality in a smaller car, has to go European or Japanese, as there has been pretty much nothing in that category from the U.S. Today the Cruze probably is the closest, although it's not that small.

    People who want high quality interiors, etc., end up buying expensive cars from other countries. But that's a niche, not mainstream.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 9,661
    Seems all cars are expensive these days.
    Toy '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD, Commuter '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6 Turbo FWD, Wife's '17 VW Golf All-Track SE 4-Motion AWD
  • berriberri Posts: 8,023
    Honda too, in my experience treats their customers well and will extend warranties if there's ever an issue.

    Don't think that's necessarily true any more - check out the CRV A/C mess.
  • marsha7marsha7 Posts: 3,703
    "A Prelude seems to be more the car a young, freshly-minted Staples manager would drive."

    Or my 31 year old wife (ahem, back in 1985... :blush: :blush: ...) uh, she ain't 31 no mo'
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    Got the Expedition back from the dealer last night. Turns out the window actuator needed adjusted. No new parts were required and they didn't charge me.

    The low tire pressure warning light came on on my way to the dealer, and they even fixed the tire free of charge. So I'm content for now, well at least until the next thing breaks.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 9,661
    even good service only goes so far, it's still a hassle to deal with car problems all the time. I avoid it like the plague.
    Toy '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD, Commuter '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6 Turbo FWD, Wife's '17 VW Golf All-Track SE 4-Motion AWD
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,938
    That is indeed good service. I know that in surveys I've read about over the years, although people seem to love their imports, their dealers are almost always rated lower than domestic brands.
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,625
    Best service I ever received was at BMW dealer.

    Warranty repairs were met with a loaner....one issue needed 2 visits. The air bag sensor would not stay reset after first visit...got a loner while they ordered the entire wiring harness from Germany. Had the loaner 10 days.

    Even got a loaner for an oil change for the day!

    GM couldn't afford that, I guess. Only got one loaner for the 10 visits to GMC over the years!

    Regards,
    OW
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    edited August 2011
    GM couldn't afford that, I guess. Only got one loaner for the 10 visits to GMC over the years!

    Seems a lot of dealers don't offer loaners (non premium anyway). The dealer I use doesn't (granted I didn't buy it there either). First time I dropped the car of there and asked for a loaner, they said they'd call Enterprise for me. They give rides though.

    I've dealt with several different dealers of various makes and IMO, they've all been about the same.

    Granted I've never owned a premium vehicle. I would expect more from a MB dealer than my Ford dealer.
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