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Toyota Highlander

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  • ericdbericdb Posts: 4
    I didn't have tro try it, today when I came out one of the bulbs was working and the other one had gone bad so I replaced the one that was burned and now it works fine again..I have no clue why but it works :-).. Thanks for your input though..
    E
  • Sorry to say, but it sounds as if you were the victim of Mr Ohm. He sneaks in and causes resistance in electrical connections in wiring and especially in the light bulb socket contacts. He is sometimes shy, and can be chased away by a vibration. Other times he becomes quite bold, and is hard to eliminate. He is very good at hiding. Often a good WHACK will get rid of him!
  • ericdbericdb Posts: 4
    :-) well Mr Ohm went away with getting a new bulb in and I hope he stays away LOL..
  • chadhburke - you are exactly right. I fixed my 2001 HL (finally). There are two metal slats along the edges of the windshield next to the pillars. There is a gap or channel between the slats (mine are black strips of metal) and the windshield itself that you can stick the end of a phillips head screwdriver (or a pencil) into, Wind catches this channel and causes the whistle. Enter Lowes! I bought a bag of foam rope. It's called Backer Rod and is found in the weatherstripping section. About $4 for 20 ft. Get the 1/2" size. # 71480. It worked great. Just force it into the gap between the windshield and the molding strip. It will stay there on its own. Wala - whistle gone!
  • I want to add XM Radio and control it through the Radio, does anyone know if its possiaple. If so what do I need?
  • Has the solution that you posted, PCV valve replacement, still been working for you? Or have you had to do anything else since you last posted your message in Oct. of 2007? I have a 2002 highlander that is consuming oil only at highway speeds. Approximately 2 quarts every 250 miles at rpm's of 3000 and approximately 75 mph. It does not do this with city driving. Thanks.
  • ricdobricdob Posts: 4
    I have since switched to synthetic oil. I checked the oil this morning with about 5000 miles of a good mix of highway and city driving and I am down less than half a quart, which I think is great for a vehicle at 55,000 miles. No service since the PCV replacement!
  • loadlorloadlor Posts: 3
    Replacing the PCV did not fix my oil consumption problem at highway speeds. It still consumed a lot of oil when I drove 70 mph over a period of time. I had no problems with city driving or short highway trips.

    I did have to have some valve covers replaced and cleaned. I would have to relook at my paperwork to see what they actually did. I took it on a short trip and didn't notice any problems after that.

    During my test drives I drove from Minneapolis to Des Moines and back. I have not driven it down there in the last year or so to check on oil consumption.

    Hope this helps you.
  • Thanks for the feedback. The work that you had done, valve covers replaced, etc., was that done under warranty or under that class action settlement that Toyota has for oil sludge? And if so, did you have to produce all your oil change records before they would do the work?
    Thanks!
  • I have a 01 V6, 55000 miles. Through the forum, I learned that I needed an O2 sensor when the VSC and Engine light went on. Engine light went off, but VSC still on. I know I can do without VSC, but if the repair was reasonable, I'd like to have the work done. Anyone know what the warning light entails?

    thanks
  • Hi all,
    My wife and I just traded in our 200k camry for an 04 Highlander. We love the vehicle but are shocked at the resonance with 1 or 2 rear windows down or the moonroof open. We have kids in the back so it can be a problem. Has anyone tried to rectify it with rain gaurds on the windows or sunroof? if so how were the results? Thanks in advance, Ryan
  • grahampetersgrahampeters AustraliaPosts: 1,783
    G'day

    The noise when you wind down a rear window without winding down a front one is a bit of a shock. Unfortunately, the only fix seems to be to make sure you wind a front window down first. Training the kids does not take long as they complain harder than the parents over the buffeting!

    Cheers

    Graham
  • phrosutphrosut Posts: 122
    I believe wwest posted some time ago that if you remove the rubber check-valves in the rear side panels it stops most of the buffetting. He may see this and chime in.

    Phil
  • lmacmillmacmil Posts: 1,758
    This affects all SUV/crossovers. Our Ford Explorer did the same thing.
  • Thanks for the replys everybody. I have owned a Jeep Cherokee for 8 years and just today noticed it does the same thing! Not as bad as the highlander though...Where are these rubber check valves located? inside or out? On the doors or rear panels?
  • phrosutphrosut Posts: 122
    Those rubber check panels are located on the inside of the rear side panels IIRC. I haven't done this mod, I just remember wwest explaining how to do it. Find where the vent grille is and the check panels are directly behind it.

    We never use the moonroof and never lower the rear side windows, so it's been a non-issue for us.

    Phil
  • Can someone tell me if the 2009 Hgihlander Limited comes standard with a remote engine start? A buddy of mine said it comes standard with the remote engine start. Can I see KBB mention it breifly saying it's included in the engine immobilizer feature on the Limited. But I don't see the remote engine start mentioned as a starndard feature on Edmunds or anywhere else.
  • ryan99ryan99 Posts: 46
    I added a sunroof wind deflector and "normalized" the moonroof. This seems to have taken care of 95% of the problem. It's bearable now.
  • Does anyone know screw thread size that is used to remove the disc rotors. There are two threaded holes in each rotor that are used for this purpose. Also any tips on removing the rotors that are really rusted on.
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    The bolts than held the calipers in place work.
  • The advice about the caliper bolts seems like a good tip. I've watched them do my brakes at speedy an I've seldom seen them use the removal bolts. Usually, I see then swing a big hammer. I believe they put the lug nuts on to protect the bolt threads and wail on the rotors between the lug nuts. I'm ususally sucessful with a wheel puller but when they are really rusted in place its pretty dangerous to use this method. The last time I had a pair really siezed on, the rotor came off like a cannon ball. Stupid human tricks aside, I do have a few brake change tips to pass on:

    1) Always lower the car ont axle stands and block the tires before you start. Jacks are for raising cars, not holding them in place while you work on them.

    2) Always remove the slider pins and lubricate them using the appropriate lubricant. If they are rusty replace them. Dry or marginally rusty sliders will soon sieze. Siezed calipers cause rotor damage, shimmy and eventual brake failure.

    3) Cross Drilled Roters (After Market) are great but they are directional so left and right matter.

    4) If the brake pistons are too dificult to push back into their cylenders then they are siezed and need to be replaced.

    5) Put a large gag under the master cylender before you start pushing pistons back. This will catch any overflow. Push one cylender back at a time then mount and appy the brakes. If you try to push back more than one piston at a time the master cylender can overfow.

    6) Princess Auto sells a great tools for spreading calipers.

    7) If you go to a garage, never let them machine your rotors. Machined rotors will warp on the next usage and need to be replaced.

    8) Follow a heat break in procedure after installing new rotors. The break-in process is usually included in the box. It involves several repetitions of firm braking from 20 Kilometers to zero.
  • Does this happen to anyone? We have a 2005 FWD 6cyl highlander which spins out with the slightest touch of the accelerator from a stop or accelerating during a slow turn when the roads are wet. I've been driving FWD cars for 25 years and am quite familiar with torque steer and all sorts of other FWD symptoms if one is aggressive, but the Highlander spins out under the most conservative of driving conditions.

    I thought it was the OEM tires, so I swapped them out with a set of Yokahama Geolanders HTS and didn't really see any difference other than the increased road noise.

    So now I'm puzzled... is it the tires? the vehicle's torque?

    Does anyone else experience this with their Highlander?

    Thanks

    -Kevin
  • I have a 2005 ADW V6 Highlander. The traction is amazing. However it is a relatively heavy vehicle with a very spunky engine. 2 Wheel Drive Wheel spin would not surprise me but might be worsened by:

    - Over inflation of tires
    - Siezed Rear brake caliper sliders or parking brakes
    - Poor front wheel alignment
    - Worn-out front suspension

    Your car is old enough that I'd first check the rear brakes. Jack it up, block the tires, put it in neutral and hand turn the rear wheels. The V6 is powerful enough that it can drag around some seriously siezed calipers without a driver noticing too much.

    Try rolling back your tire pressure. Check your driveway or parking lot for Oil patch conditions that could be contaminating the contact surface of your tires.

    Next time, go for AWD. The fuel economy is virtually the same, steering is superior (with VCS Relay removed), tires last longer and stress on the drive train is roughly cut in half.
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    #1 "...block the tires..." wheel "chocks"..??

    To #2 I would also add that the slider pin barrells/cylinders should also be cleaned thoroughly.

    I would also suggest that for most of us cross-drilled or slotted rotors are a waste of money and the majority of the time a detriment to braking, loss of CSA frictional surface.

    #4 "..pistons are too difficult.." Hard to qualify "too difficult" absent personal experience.

    To #7 I would add ONLY allow the rotors to be turned/machined if it can be shown that it is truly required using a micrometer.
  • We drive a 2004 FWD Highlander with 120,000 troublefree miles, and the traction is amazingly good on wet roads, no slip, no slide. The drivability, traction and steering on wet roads is very good. We drive on Firestone Destination tires inflated to 30 pounds. All the steering and suspension is still original. This is a GREAT car! We plan to be driving it for 5 more years.
    There must be something wrong with yours if you are having traction problems. Get the steering, suspension, brakes, tires & wheels checked.
    Good Luck,
    E.D. in Sunny Florida
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    Your foot is too heavy for the V6, try driving it in snow mode all the time.
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    "..spins out..."

    TC should INSTANTLY activate, braking the spinning wheel(s) and dethrottling the engine just as soon as front wheelspin/slip is detected.
  • i have a 2003 highlander limited. The rear u-joint on the front drive line has some play in it- not bad yet- but in looking at it there is not any snap rings on the outside or c clips on the inside it looks like some sort of pressed in piece in the outside of the cap . am i just not seeing correct or is this something different. anyone know?
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    If you are a Toyota owner and interested in sharing your reaction to the recall with reporters, send an email stating the vehicle you own, your telephone number, and the best time you can be reached.

    Send to: karen@edmunds.com
  • jps47jps47 Posts: 1
    we have a 04 highlander, we are getting clear water coming in car from several areas. first seen running from pass. side panel pooling on floor by pass. seat. have same problem on driver side and in the back seat area also.
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