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Jeep Wrangler

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Comments

  • they may be rugged and durrable but anything is distructable in my sis's hands, she crashed sahara '01 into a tree, the car was totaled and i was pissed
  • 99tj99tj Posts: 187
    It may not have been a Wrangler, but my 98 Cherokee Sport (the 99 tj replaced it) took a beating! About 2 months after I bought it, I rolled it and was as close to a total loss as you can get. Ins. company decided to fix instead.

    The body shop put on a used roof, rear hatch, driver side door, quarter panel, etc...

    To my amazement, I never had a problem with it do to the accident. About a year and a half later I hit a black bear while driving through PA. Drove the rest of the way to Ohio, without the need of a tow-truck. The bear did about $3500 worth of damage. It was a solid vehicle from the day I bought it to the day I sold it.

     

    Thank God I don't have a stories like that about my TJ (knock on wood!) Maybe one of these days I'll put it's toughness to the test on some trails!

     

    -Dan
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    Have you managed to get some photos up anywhere yet? Can't wait to see it!
  • MTNGAL. Well I am off to Aruba in 2 weeks. I just reserved a Yellow Sport soft top for 10 days. Should be alot of fun. The interior of Aruba has many dirt roads to explore. Anyone out there been to Aruba and explored with a Jeep? Taking my fishing gear to test the waters. Go Easy-John
  • A friend of mine just did this on his 90 wrangler. He got the Rhino linning and was all set to do the entire jeep inside and out. However, i talked him out of it and he only did the inside this week. It looks great and actually added some insulation in a way. It ran him $300 but a friend did it so he recieved a discount woulda been $550 for the inside/out.
  • i do have a couple of photos up on another site, kinda dark shots though. Im not sure how to post them on this site. Im going to take some better pics soon as i can.
  • Im jealous, have fun, love to see some photos....
  • snowed last night we got a little over a foot but with drifts there were some spots with over 3 feet...had some fun till got stuck in one, oh well you live you learn right?

     

    anyone know how to make the axles lock?...as in the tires spin at same speed + torque regardless of traction
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
    You would be talking about a full locker when you want a tire to pull, even when the opposite tire on that same axle has zero traction. I have one of those on my Thelma Jane. Mine is a Detroit Soft Locker, but there are different types that can be installed. I'm very happy with my Detroit and would highly recommend one.

     

    You should be aware that lockers can have some annoying side effects for street use: they are really best suited for off road use.

     

    When you take a corner, your tires have to spin at different speeds, since the outer tire must travel a longer path than does the inner tire, but it has to travel that distance in the same amount of time.

     

    The outer tire has to be able to turn faster than the inner tire, so the direct connection between the two tires must be interrupted during turns. This is accomplished by the locker releasing in corners and re-engaging once the turn is completed. The release occurs upon deceleration, and the re-engagement when torque is re-applied when the vehicle accelerates after resuming a straight path. (One adjustment in driving style that is necessary when you have a rear locker is that you do not get back on the gas quite as quickly coming out of a sharp turn.)

     

    Lockers vary in the smoothness of their operation. A Detroit Soft Locker will normally disengage and re-engage very smoothly, once a person learns to wait just a split second longer to get back on the gas after a turn. Even with a Detroit, you will know it's back there. To me, the benefits are well worth it, but then I go off roading every weekend. For a Jeep that will see duty only on the street, I don't think I would recommend a locker.

     

    There are selectable lockers, but they are expensive. A selectable locker can be turned on and off. The Rub icons have selectable lockers front and back.

     

    There are after market selectable lockers, like the ARB, which uses compressed air to engage the locker. You have to buy an onboard air compressor as part of the system, if you want ARB's. There is also an Ox brand locker that is cable actuated. There are also some electric selectable lockers out there.

     

    Instead of a locker, what might be best for you is limited slip. Limited slips cause no problem on the pavement: they do not have the quirks of a full locker. For a limited slip to make both tires pull, there has to be at least a little bit of traction on both sides. If one tire is completely off the ground, as often is the case off road, then a limited slip will not make the other tire pull, like a full locker would do. However, a limited slip can sometimes be "fooled" by applying a little brake while the gas pedal is being pushed down. The resistance from the brake can be "interpreted" by the differential as traction, and the tire with better traction will pull.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Tom

     

    Have you hugged your Jeep today?

     

    P.S. I also have a front locker on Thelma Jane, but it is a Lock Right locker. It is not as expensive and not as smooth as a Detroit, but in 2WD it doesn't do anything, so smoothness of operation is not really a factor on a front locker. I hear some clicking noise in tight corners, but that's it.

     

    Some people run Lock Rights in the back, but I'm glad I spent the extra bucks for a Detroit in the back.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Very good explanation of the lockers Tom (#15626). I posted this with a relevant title to help anyone doing a search in the future.
  • thanks, if i were to go with only one locker should i go with a front axle or rear? is it worth buying if im only gonna buy one or is it kinda an all or nothing type of deal?
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I've just got back from a 1500 mile road trip, having collected a new (to me) companion vehicle for my Wrangler.

     

    It's got limited slip diffs at both ends and a locking rear, just like a Rubicon, and it rolls on 37" tires. It has a considerably tighter turning circle than the Jeep, 26' vs. 35', and 16" of ground clearance. It's only a couple of inches taller than my Wrangler, but it's longer and wider. However, even though it's coil sprung and has comfy heated leather seats, the ride makes the Wrangler seem like limo.

     

    If I gave more details it would be too easy, but I must say that my wife, who shared the driving, absolutely loves it!
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    The answer is partly dependant on the type of driving you will be doing, especially in the question of front vs. rear. If you do a lot of rock crawling or hill climbing then do the front first, otherwise doing the rear first will probably be more beneficial. One is good, two is better. However, financial considerations may be a factor as well.
  • are there any benifits to front vs. back?

     

    thanks for the help guys
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    It's often an issue of traction. When you're climbing, most of the vehicle weight is on the rear wheels, so they get plenty of traction. The front will spin a wheel more easily, and a locker will allow the wheel that has the most traction to assist in pulling the vehicle forward. The front pulls you up, the back pushes you, and you nearly always need a combination of the two on a steep climb. The biggest disadvantage of a front locker is that is makes steering very difficult in four wheel drive.
  • ok, well then i guess ill have to look into a rear locker, thanks guys
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    I give up - everything I come up with doesn't make sense. I can't imagine anything being a bit longer and wider than the Wrangler and having a tighter turning circle, unless it is a tractor. But I don't think they have heated seats (can't you tell I'm a city girl?).
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    No, not a tractor, though I'm sure the ones with a cab have the option of seat heaters.

     

    I can say that it's an '03 in stock factory trim, and it has seat belts and ABS but no airbags. Does that help any?
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
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