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Suzuki Grand Vitara vs Subaru Forester vs Hyundai Santa Fe vs Jeep Liberty vs Ford Escape vs Saturn

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Comments

  • bvcrdbvcrd Posts: 196
    One reason we chose the Liberty CRD was the Selectrac. It has a part time , full time and of course the 4 low settings. The part time is good if you see some black ice up ahead or just need some help getting rolling away from an incline at a stop light but you don't want to run it in that on the dry. The full time is exactly that. Run it if you want but loose fuel economy. I didn't like the Escapes version mainly be I wanted to be in control of the system and not rely on some switch or electronics to fail me. And, the Escape seemed like an under powered 4x4 car.....not for me.
  • sap1sap1 Posts: 4
    After noticing rust on the back wheel wells of my 2001 I tried to get ford to help correct. Was totally blown off by Michigan. Body man stated bad metal and would be cost prohibitve to fix. Have had numerous issues with car only has 58K. Very poor gas mileage, wiper quit bad wheel bearing and now noise from front end when turning. Idon't trust this piece of junk. In addition does not heat or cool
    very well. I plan to get a toyota very soon.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    There is a special paint that you can use to paint over rust, it's expensive ($80/gallon) but supposedly it works. Might want to look into that.

    Rust will hurt the resale value even if you do trade.

    -juice
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,124
    What region do you live in?
  • swanneeswannee Posts: 4
    Just sold my 1998 Ford Explorer Sport 2WD - it had 210,000 miles. It was a champ, not a scratch, no major mechanical issues. I thought it was a solid-quality SUV. Just bought a Jeep Liberty Ltd, all tricked out with heated, leather seats, sunroof, ...Can't believe how they've upgraded all the bells & whistles! Hope this SV is as good as my Explorer!
  • sap1sap1 Posts: 4
    Northeast Ohio near Canton
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,124
    Reason I ask is I live in probably the wetest region in the U.S. (Pacific Northwest) and my 01 Escape has no rust at all.. Can this rust be attributed to salt on your roads?
    Another reason I ask is rust on cars past about 1990 is something I never really hear about anylonger, from any make/brand. With the metal/frame dipping used, along with paint technology has pretty much made rust on vehicles a thing of the past.. :confuse:
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    In the NE they do use chemicals to melt the snow, it's pretty nasty. You end up with a white film on the outside of your vehicle.

    I remember spending some time in Taos, NM, and they just added sand on top of the snow. No chemicals used to melt it. I think it was because a lot of people drink well water and the chemicals contaminate it.

    I agree though, most steel is now galvanized so this is less of an issue nowadays.

    -juice
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    Automobile rust perforation "has dropped from 90 percent in 1976 to just 20 percent in 1980. By 1990, the percentage of rust perforation dropped to only 6 percent." Galvanized steel is a big factor in the reduction, as Juice mentioned.

    Lots more at the Salt Institute.

    Steve, Host
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Thanks for the interesting link.

    1990 was 16 years ago, so the number should even be a lot lower now, maybe half that 6%.

    -juice
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    When I lived in AK salt was used to keep the sand from freezing so they could spread it. That was ok, but the more enlightened states and provinces store the salt/sand mix in barns on top of impermeable surfaces so the stuff won't leach. I knew a guy whose well was ruined by an unprotected salt pile a half mile away.

    The actual concentration spread on the roads must not have been too bad since cars don't seem any rustier up there anymore than anywhere else.

    We gave a ski bum a lift to his '87 Legacy the other day and it had a bunch of rust on the fender wells. Things have changed!

    Steve, Host
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Loyale, probably? I don't think the Legacy came out until '90. Loyales did tend to rust.

    -juice
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    All I could see was the L - the rest was rusted off, LOL.

    Steve, Host
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yeah, but they kept running, it was wild.

    My cousin had one with 144k miles, ended up selling it to her nephew to get a new Outback. AFAIK it's still going.

    -juice
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    Actually it looked in pretty good shape. A few kisses, some rust at the top of the wheel wells and a missing hubcap. I think the guy said it had 187k on it.

    Varmint just posted an interesting link about safety numbers that tire kickers concerned about safety may want to look at:

    Informed For Life

    Steve, Host
  • kutyafalkutyafal Posts: 27
    I actually took the 2006 Grand Vitara into the "rough" during a recent test drive. It did very well! Check out my full post here.
  • done37done37 Posts: 64
    Hi, New to this forum and noticed this old but interesting post. Being that it is an old post, the subject has veered a bit of course. I will lend a hand to get it back on course by offering some scintillating biased reporting on why I would chose the Forester. The Forester XT to be more succinct. Turbocharged and offroad capability gives this sport ute an advantage. Runs with Mustangs, slings Mud with Jeeps, Luxuriates with the Lexus(premium package ;) ) and is as reliable as a Honda. Drive one today, you won't disagree.
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,059
    The Forester XT to be more succinct.

    If you're using more words then, by definition, it is less succinct - but it is definitely more precise! :)

    tidester, host
  • done37done37 Posts: 64
    "If you're using more words then, by definition, it is less succinct - but it is definitely more precise"!

    Ouch. Point well taken.

    Thanks,
    Don
    Newbie
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    "and is as reliable as a Honda"

    Actually it is more reliable than a Honda. I remember reading the Forester is one of the single most reliable cars out there.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    From the last CR annual auto issue, the Forester beat the average Honda, and every single Acura model. But the CR-V actually eeks out the Forester if you're looking at that class only.

    Doesn't matter, we're splitting hairs here. All models mentioned are reliable.

    -juice
  • xostnotxostnot Posts: 232
    I'm not sure how the Forrester can be better offroad than the Grand Vitara given that you can't get a low range gearing on the Subaru.
  • done37done37 Posts: 64
    Given that the Suzuki does have Low range gearing, it is probably a better off-roader. However, the Forester XT has the lowest first gear if I am not mistaken in the subaru lineup(manual), and the torque of the turbo helps.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    Actually I'll split a hair or two with you. After reviewing CRs statistics, I say the hair goes to the Forester, if you are reviewing the last two or three years. For 2005, you trade off 1 black circle on Body Integrity on the Subie with 2 half red circles on the Honda... one on suspension and the other on Body Integrity.

    You pick it.

    Ken
  • xostnotxostnot Posts: 232
    If you haven't had a large meal recently, you might want to check the comsumer safety complaints about the Forester on the NHTSA website.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    I don't really care about these types of items.

    1. There is no independent verification of the facts, so people can write anything about any model.
    2. The entire story is never revealed by the complaintant, so you don't know even if there is a grain of truth in the complaint, if something ridiculously illegal and/or stupid was going on at the time.

    Case in point: I remember a post on the 3 series board a while back, where the poster was saying how unbalanced the car was. Going 25 on a straight paved dry road sunny day no traffic, the car "suddenly" started fishtailing? or something else. Poster claims he/she lost control and landed in a ditch. Result car is a POS and a deathtrap. How many would actually believe that story?

    I also believe that someone stupid enough (and I don't underestimate the stupidity of the American driver), could get a car into the worst of situations, and blame it on the car.
  • done37done37 Posts: 64
    The complaint section of the NHTSA website is questionable at best, even hilarious at times. I have pretty much looked at the NHTSA website every time I purchased a car. Here is a link to the complaints on a 2005 Honda CRV.

    http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/problems/complain/results.cfm

    Not that I am picking on Honda, just proving the point that every car and truck out there can be pummeled with unsubstantiated complaints
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    If enough "unsubstantiated" complaints come in, the NHTSA starts seeing a trend. If there's a real safety concern, it probably doesn't take too many complaints to warrant further investigation.

    Just like reading the posts on here; it doesn't take much to weed out the venting and dubious comments but you do start seeing issues repeat themselves for certain makes/models.
  • done37done37 Posts: 64
    Your absolutley right, a few of those complaints can actually turn into problems, TSB's and even recalls, but most stay unsubstantiated. To use the complaint section as a research tool on your next purchase or a barometer for the reliability of a particular car is ill advised in my opinion is all.
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