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Comments

  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoPosts: 114,314
    stickguy said:

    blame cell phones and distracted drivers.

    And, in certain states, the legalization of a particular plant.

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    MODERATOR

    2016 VW Jetta 1.4T SE / 2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • suydamsuydam Posts: 4,056
    Not the increase in speed limits practically nationwide?
    '14 Buick Encore Convenience
    '17 Chevy Volt Premiere
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875
    suydam said:

    Not the increase in speed limits practically nationwide?

    That's reduced collisions and fatalities in every State to do so.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    edited April 2018
    Not any more. The adjusted death rate in NV, So. Dakota, Montana and Wyoming for 2016 ( the year after they raised their speed limits) are all greater than California, and in the case of Montana and Wyoming, are double the rate in California. This adjustment includes deaths per 100,000 people and deaths per miles driven.

    NY, DC and Hawaii have the lowest death rates.

    I suspect what is happening in states with 80 mph speed limits is that they probably did decrease the # of accidents, but increased the fatality rate per accident.

    The most lethal states in 2016? Mississippi and So. Carolina by a fair margin.

    All this really shows is that safer cars can't compensate for all the other complexities that go into automotive fatalities.

    That's why I always tell people that there is no such thing as a "safe car"--some are just less dangerous than others.


  • berriberri Posts: 9,955
    I also blame poor visibility. Way to often someone starts drifting into my lane and then jerking the car back. Current car design basically has done away with decent rearward visibility.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875
    edited April 2018

    Not any more. The adjusted death rate in NV, So. Dakota, Montana and Wyoming for 2016 ( the year after they raised their speed limits) are all greater than California, and in the case of Montana and Wyoming, are double the rate in California. This adjustment includes deaths per 100,000 people and deaths per miles driven.

    NY, DC and Hawaii have the lowest death rates.

    I suspect what is happening in states with 80 mph speed limits is that they probably did decrease the # of accidents, but increased the fatality rate per accident.

    The most lethal states in 2016? Mississippi and So. Carolina by a fair margin.

    All this really shows is that safer cars can't compensate for all the other complexities that go into automotive fatalities.

    That's why I always tell people that there is no such thing as a "safe car"--some are just less dangerous than others.


    More targeted research is needed because the "zones" with increased speeds are very limited in most States with higher speed limits. Don't blame my 75, 80, and 85 MPH highways for deaths on the 55, 65 and 70 MPH sections of roadway!!!!

    I think we all agree the higher speed zones with new higher limits are still a minority of the mileage being logged in those States.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Driver's tests have to be harder. It's interesting that in some countries that have reciprocity agreements to turn your international driver's license into the national driver's license of that country, often exclude the United States from the list. Gee, I wonder why? (example--Japan will not accept a U.S. license as a gateway to a Japanese license, but they will take all European countries + UK, Taiwan and.....even Canada!

    Are Canadians really better drivers than Americans or do the Japanese just think so?
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    berri said:

    I also blame poor visibility. Way to often someone starts drifting into my lane and then jerking the car back. Current car design basically has done away with decent rearward visibility.

    Car design has nothing to do with it. I used to drive hi cube vans in college with only side mirrors. The problem is people don’t know how to drive to start with and they’re more distracted.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,633
    edited April 2018
    Got my stop/start working again.
    It seems it got turned off when I brought it in for service.
    There is a setting 'Auto Engine Off''.
    The manual didn't say what it really did, but I toggled it and now the engine is shutting off at complete stops again.
    You can also selectively temporarily disable the stop/start using a button on the center console.
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • benjaminhbenjaminh Posts: 4,322
    edited April 2018
    The new 2019 Toyota Avalon. What is up with the styling teams at Toyota and Honda? Strange stuff imho. I guess the idea is that it doesn't look like anything else you've seen before on the road. Ultimately I guess it's just more of the planned obsolescence pioneered by GM starting in the late 1920s and 1930s:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence






    2018 Acura TLX 2.4 Tech 4WS (mine), 2018 Honda CR-V EX AWD (wife's)
  • berriberri Posts: 9,955
    That may be because when you drive something like a truck you know you can't see out the back window. When you are driving in a car the habit formed over the years is to look out over your shoulder and through your rear window. btw, I have had the same thing happen with delivery van type vehicles. So I agree about mirrors, but think it helps when you can use your rear window and have less obstructed C or D pillars.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062

    Got my stop/start working again.
    It seems it got turned off when I brought it in for service.
    There is a setting 'Auto Engine Off''.
    The manual didn't say what it really did, but I toggled it and now the engine is shutting off at complete stops again.
    You can also selectively temporarily disable the stop/start using a button on the center console.

    That’s not what auto engine off is supposed to do. That turns off the engine after it idles for a certain amount of time.

    If it does work that way it’s not documented anywhere, and people everywhere have been trying to find such an off switch for the auto-stop/start on many new Fords.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,633
    @akirby,
    I thought it was tied to remote start.
    All I know is after I changed that setting, the stop/start functioned as I am accustomed to.
    Could be coincidence.
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • benjaminhbenjaminh Posts: 4,322
    edited April 2018
    I've started seeing the new 2018 Accord on the road, and I'm slowly warming up to the unusual styling. Yesterdays I saw an LX close up in a parking lot, and if I hadn't already known it was a c. $23k car I would have guessed low 30s. The LED front turn signals, which I saw in operation for the first time, look good.

    The model I might eventually be interested in is the 2018 Accord Hybrid. Honda is usually quite careful in how they do their trims. In other words, each trim seems to represent good value, and is very carefully calibrated that way.

    But Honda seems to have thrown that strategy out the window a little bit for the base/LX model of the 2018 Accord Hybrid. Let me try to explain....The upper trims of the 2018 Accord Hybrid are based very closely off of the same 1.5 turbo versions of the car. And so if you get an EX Hybrid, the features are almost exactly the same as the EX 1.5 turbo version of the car, but the hybrid costs $1530 more. So, for EX, EXL and Touring Hybrids that $1530 basically represents the cost of the hybrid powertrain over the 1.5 turbo.

    With the base hybrid Accord, however, which is is also $1530 more than the standard LX Accord, Honda also throws in for "free" the following features that are not found on the standard LX Accord....

    Remote start
    60/40 split folding rear seats
    Smart entry and walk away lock
    Upgraded alloys with upgraded Michelin tires
    Push button transmission with "Sport" mode and paddle shifters

    To me personally those features alone seem worth about $1500. For instance, since I park on the street (my wife gets our one-car garage) I love remote start during the winter for defrosting the car. And since I'm used to smart entry, at this point I'd rather not have a car without it. The pushbutton transmission reminds me of the pushbutton transmission on my wife's 1961 Dodge Lancer from when I first met her in 1990. Looks cool and futuristic to me, even if some might make fun of it. And I like the idea of driving with my special sealed cup of coffee without potentially bumping into the shift knob when I take a sip at a stop light. The split folding seats are also a nice touch, although realistically I only use the split folding seats once a year at most. Upgraded wheels and tires almost always works for me. Although paddle shifters on a hybrid seems silly, in fact the Hybrid is almost certain to be faster to 60 than a 1.5 turbo Accord. And no turbo lag!

    Anyway, the base model hybrid is a strangely good deal, and I assume it means that Honda wants to sell a lot of them. And probably it cuts down on manufacturing costs a little by just making all the Accord hybrids the same in terms of these features.

    But, ultimately, I don't think this model would work for us, because it lacks two features that I really would like—AndroidAuto and Blind Spot Monitoring. To get those you have to go up the EX Hybrid, which costs $3900 more than the base hybrid.

    Anyway, here's a video tour of the 2018 Accord Hybrid LX/base. Notice that the LED headlights are tinted blue for just the hybrid models. You can see that about 14 seconds in on this video in the closeup.


    2018 Acura TLX 2.4 Tech 4WS (mine), 2018 Honda CR-V EX AWD (wife's)
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,398
    andres3 said:

    suydam said:

    Not the increase in speed limits practically nationwide?

    That's reduced collisions and fatalities in every State to do so.
    I don't recall that's true in Ohio. However, there are folks who will manipulate the statistics used to give the appearance of fewer deaths and injuries. A few months back there was a report that injuries and deaths have increased.

    Speed kills.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    It’s been proven time and again that changing speed limits don’t change how fast people drive. People drive at what they believe to be a safe speed regardless. People don’t go faster when you raise the limit - they’re just less likely to get a ticket.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 3,181
    When I drive from Chicago to Michigan the speed limit changes from 65 to 70. I set the cruise to 5 above posted when traffic permits so when I hit the Michigan border my speed does increase with speed limit increase. That’s just one example but I’m sure I’m hardly alone.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,126
    akirby said:

    berri said:

    I also blame poor visibility. Way to often someone starts drifting into my lane and then jerking the car back. Current car design basically has done away with decent rearward visibility.

    Car design has nothing to do with it. I used to drive hi cube vans in college with only side mirrors. The problem is people don’t know how to drive to start with and they’re more distracted.
    Exactly!!!

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,126
    My i3 got a slight tap on the rear bumper so I'm in a renal- an Altima. The ultimate vanilla car. Not terrible(well, the voice recognition/Bluetooth implementation is pretty bad). It's simply light centuries away form my cup of automotive tea.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • suydamsuydam Posts: 4,056
    m6user said:

    When I drive from Chicago to Michigan the speed limit changes from 65 to 70. I set the cruise to 5 above posted when traffic permits so when I hit the Michigan border my speed does increase with speed limit increase. That’s just one example but I’m sure I’m hardly alone.

    +1
    '14 Buick Encore Convenience
    '17 Chevy Volt Premiere
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875

    andres3 said:

    suydam said:

    Not the increase in speed limits practically nationwide?

    That's reduced collisions and fatalities in every State to do so.
    I don't recall that's true in Ohio. However, there are folks who will manipulate the statistics used to give the appearance of fewer deaths and injuries. A few months back there was a report that injuries and deaths have increased.

    Speed kills.
    Speed kills is an absolute myth, proven wrong time and time again, with no alternative evidence to speak of.

    Actually, the only manipulation seems to be in the direction of fear-mongering, sensationalism, and headlines. If anything, the manipulators love making it appear as though there are more deaths and injuries!

    Collision and fatality rates have been going down almost every single year in the last 30 years. One or two years of an aberration does not change the overall trend.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_curve

    https://priceonomics.com/is-every-speed-limit-too-low/
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,398
    "The number of fatal and injury crashes increased 22 percent over those two years, translating into five more fatal crashes and 421 more injury crashes.

    "On all other Ohio roads during the same period, the number of crashes decreased by 1 percent and fatal crashes dropped by 3 percent."

    http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171116/state-patrol-ohio-crashes-up-24-percent-since-70-mph-speed-limit

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875

    andres3 said:

    suydam said:

    Not the increase in speed limits practically nationwide?

    That's reduced collisions and fatalities in every State to do so.
    I don't recall that's true in Ohio. However, there are folks who will manipulate the statistics used to give the appearance of fewer deaths and injuries. A few months back there was a report that injuries and deaths have increased.

    Speed kills.
    Apparently 55 kills too; best analysis of the failed 55 MPH speed limit federally mandated in recent history:

    https://www.motorists.org/wp-content/themes/nma/pk/lib/pdf/web/viewer.html?file=https://www.motorists.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/55-mph-study.pdf
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,404

    My i3 got a slight tap on the rear bumper so I'm in a renal- an Altima. The ultimate vanilla car. Not terrible(well, the voice recognition/Bluetooth implementation is pretty bad). It's simply light centuries away form my cup of automotive tea.

    If it is painted black, our fellow poster @jmonroe will insist you are driving a chick magnet - "chick" in his case being a lady who is collecting her Social Security. B)

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    I’m talking about the majority of drivers, not every single person. Here in Atlanta most people drive 70-75 on the interstates regardless of whether the speed limit is 55 or 65.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    Speed only causes an accident if you’re exceeding the speed limit by at least 100%. Below that the vehicle isn’t going to fly off the road. Most accidents are caused by drivers being distracted or following too closely. Speed can make it worse but rarely is an accident caused by speeding.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875
    edited April 2018

    "The number of fatal and injury crashes increased 22 percent over those two years, translating into five more fatal crashes and 421 more injury crashes.

    "On all other Ohio roads during the same period, the number of crashes decreased by 1 percent and fatal crashes dropped by 3 percent."

    http://www.dispatch.com/news/20171116/state-patrol-ohio-crashes-up-24-percent-since-70-mph-speed-limit

    You do realize your own link finds the cause of the increase in crashes to be, and I quote:

    "Crashes attributable to unsafe lane changes increased 66 percent on 70-mph interstates and highways."

    Unsafe lane changes are the cause of your accidents in Ohio, not speed. You can make an unsafe lane change at any speed, whether it be 5 MPH, 55 MPH, or 155 MPH. I would say most unsafe lane changes are due to incompetence, obliviousness, distraction, non-situationally aware, and failure to look and use ones own eyeballs.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • brian125brian125 New York Posts: 5,212

    2016 BMW X-5 35i, 2012 MB ML350

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875
    edited April 2018
    brian125 said:
    So you went to the NHTSA usual drivel backed by Insurance monies no doubt (not to mention a loony anti-car author):

    Where to start, so much to pick apart in that poorly crafted propaganda piece.... I think I'll just quote the first comment on the site:

    The first commenter on your article sums it up the best:

    Ugh, I should have noticed the author’s name and stopped reading. Another nonsense Alissa Walker article.

    So this time she claims that traffic deaths are increasing and the increase is due to speeding. Then the only data shown is from a study that shows speeding is cited in a declining share of accidents (from 31-32% down to 28-29%). But of course the uptick in the most recent two years …

    Again, distracted driving is a much more likely explanation, Alissa continues to refuse to acknowledge this in her articles. It’s also true that miles driven is increasing again, which is going to lead to more accidents, some of which have injuries and deaths.

    Look, there are valid points in the NTSB study
    a) vehicles travelling faster are going to have more risk of death or injury in a crash, that’s just basic physics.
    b) speed limits are pretty nonsensical (which is why so many drive above the speed limit)

    Police officers will always list speed as a factor if the car was going above the speed limit. So now we have 28% of accidents where someone is driving above the speed limit, with no information about other contributing factors, which the NTSB says are frequent. Yet seems to me > 50% of people are travelling faster than the speed limit , so we’ve proven nothing.

    Similarly Alissa tries to establish a false equivalency to drunk driving. Drunk driving kills as many as speeding, but really what is the ratio of people driving drunk to people speeding? Drunk driving is far, far more dangerous than speeding.

    Jumping to zero-tolerance enforcement of arbitrarily set speed limits is stupid and just Alissa’s typical anti-driving rhetoric.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,875
    brian125 said:
    Drunk drivers tend to speed. Drunk drivers that speed tend to crash. Drunk drivers that crash tend to kill or be killed. All valid points.

    However, why, you should ask, is the NHTSA so quick to pad the "speed kills" stats with drunks that speed? Do we lack the common sense to know that it is the drunkenness that is the cause of death in such situations, not the speeding?

    Why must we continue to lump unrelated causal factors to perpetuate the myth?
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
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