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GM News, New Models and Market Share

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  • xrunner2xrunner2 Posts: 3,062
    I bet even people 30 and under have heard of "See the USA......in your Chevrolet".

    That's good. Maybe they could start running that ad with the intro of the 2014 Impala. With current music themes, would be good to show a good old fashioned family of husband, wife, two young children in a scene doing vacation somewhere. FL, CA, AZ, etc
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    edited January 2013
    Well, the tourism people would probably like it, but GM customers around the world may scratch their heads a bit. You could tweak it to Cruze the USA in your Chevrolet.

    Traverse the Great Wall in your Chevy? (really should be a Buick for the Chinese market).
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,756
    Who says they absolutely need the same theme world-wide as they do here? (hypothetical question)
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    Oh, I'm sure they have local themes to match the market. Which brings up the question of how the various ones translate (or don't).

    Right now at least the GM logo pretty much works everywhere.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    Because Chevy is having problems in the international market and wants to grow their business there. You don't do that by marrying the American flag. They need a campaign that can cross borders.

    Who says they absolutely need the same theme world-wide as they do here? (hypothetical question)

    What's cheaper, one marketing theme or fifty?
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    edited January 2013
    But it's poor economy if the one size fits all theme doesn't sell as many cars as a marketing plan tailored to a country or region.

    Since marketing is such an arcane science, who knows what really works or doesn't though? "Find New Roads" is as good as anything ("Go Further"?). And backing soccer makes a lot of sense.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    I happen to like "Find New Roads." And I think it's actually designed to cross borders. Sounds almost like going exploring in exotic places.

    And unlike "See the USA" it's not chaining you to a particular culture or geographical location. As well as not being the usual corny GM garbage about being more about an American company than a good vehicle. Frankly "Find New Roads" presents all sorts of potential for exploring twisty back roads in a Sonic RS, going on a family vacation in an Equinox or Malibu, or going off-roading in a 4x4. It's great if they use it right (big "if" yes).
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    Well, with all the new construction in Asia, it should work good in China too. Be a good tie-in with OnStar - as in, where the heck does this new road go? :shades:
  • xrunner2xrunner2 Posts: 3,062
    And backing soccer makes a lot of sense.

    Don't know about the appeal of soccer in the U.S. as far as viewing on tv. Does anyone watch soccer games except for parents looking/cheering their kids playing at a school or neighborhood league?

    Wonder if Chevrolet will intro, or at least tease, with an ad for the 2014 Impala on the Super Bowl broadcast. It shouldn't be cute. Just well made.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    Excellent point, provides a great hook for selling OnStar Navigation.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,862
    Does anyone watch soccer games except for parents looking/cheering their kids playing at a school or neighborhood league?

    The MLS teams average almost 19,000 attendees per game with the Seattle Sounders pulling in over 43,000 per game.

    But I think steve is referring to the sponsorship deal GM made with Manchester United of the English Premier League. Man U is the most popular football team in the world and the Chevrolet name will be on the front of their jerseys for 7 sevens years starting in 2014 flashing on television sets in millions of homes.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 21,394
    I noticed a lot of government money went to the auto industry in the US. $1,400,000,000 went to a battery maker for 300 jobs. That $4,666,666.66 ... per job.

    Washington — Nissan Motor Co. said it will begin U.S. production of its all-electric Leaf on Thursday in Tennessee as part of a $1.4 billion government loan.

    Makes a small subsidy to GM look like swiss cheese.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Hmmm... Car rags often pick apart new makes and models, and at the same time, carry advertisements from the very same manufacturers of the products the magazine is hammering on, so, yes, it does happen.

    The overall JD Power business model is "suspect" simply because of the way it's financed. Reviews can be critical, just not too critical.

    IIRC, in a recent issue of Motor Trend, towards the back, where they elaborate on their long-term test cars in their possession, the magazine was giving the monthly update of a BMW product that had a constant, intermittent drivability issue with the engine acting up for a while and then returning to normal operation. It had been in for service, but nothing was found, but the problem continued to recur with some frequency.

    Yet, in the section on the car details entitled "Unresolved issues", the entry was "None".

    As this example shows, it's quite possible to have it both ways...
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Nissan Motor Co. said it will begin U.S. production of its all-electric Leaf on Thursday in Tennessee as part of a $1.4 billion government loan.


    From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130109/AUTO0104/301090398#ixzz2Hab1sJ00

    You do understand the difference between a "loan" and a "cash trade for stock" transaction, I assume...
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I'm not surprised a cheaper Nissan would start to fall apart after the 12 month adjustment period where the dealer basically has to fix everything for free.

    Remember, the CEO's nick name is "le cost cutter".
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Does seem like a risky loan. Wonder what interest rate Nissan is paying for that? Projections on EV sales always seem wildly optimistic.

    Having said that, the Volt is beating the leaf and the Caddy version is on the way.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,156
    Why not do an updated version? Today's pop stars...vary them for different commercials. Show some of the heritage cars...and they arguably have the best heritage out there...along with new product.

    Seems like a no-brainer to me.


    Just think, if you were less bright you could earn a pile of money marketing for them. :P ;)

    But you're not, so I guess you just the Chevy marketing like the rest of us.

    Those marketers have to earn their money somehow so ...... viola! ...a new slogan.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,156
    What's cheaper, one marketing theme or fifty?

    Didn't stop them from having 10+ brands up to a few years ago.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,756
  • steverstever Posts: 52,683
    But I think steve is referring to the sponsorship deal GM made with Manchester United of the English Premier League

    More of a Tottenham Hotspur fan here but I think soccer has a worldwide reach. Not so much in the US but it's huge most everywhere else.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Slogans need music, too. ;)
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,862
    The overall JD Power business model is "suspect" simply because of the way it's financed. Reviews can be critical, just not too critical.

    JD Power doesn't do reviews. They gather data from consumers and then sell it to the manufacturers. BTW, they do so in at least a dozen different industries.

    You can't buy a prize from JD Power. What you can buy is the data that shows you do well and what you do poorly.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Risky? I agree. Anything investment wise in electric auto transportation falls in that category.

    Still, its a loan, not a grant nor an equity investment, so there's (at least, in theory) an added level of protection for the taxpayer.

    IMO, the path taken by the Volt holds the most promise, as you aren't left stranded along the side of the road after your battery dies half way up a long grade...
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited January 2013
    Call it what you like.

    From a purely scientific basis, the methodology fails on multiple levels.

    Then again, its meant to be used as, and IS used as, a marketing tool by the manufacturers.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 21,394
    edited January 2013
    >You do understand the difference between a "loan" and a "cash trade for stock" transaction

    I'm torn between answering that simple-minded comment with a "No, I'm too darned dumb" or a "Yup, you can lose money on both." :P :(

    It would be like loaning money to Solyndra, right?

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited January 2013
    So, you are willing to compare a financially successful company like Nissan with an unproven startup like Solyndra.

    I wouldn't.

    http://nissannews.com/en-US/nissan/usa/releases/nissan-begins-u-s-assembly-of-20- - 13-leaf-electric-vehicle-and-batteries

    Based upon your previous comments here, I suspect the real issue for you isn't the loan or its amount. It's who got it. Had the recipient been GM you probably wouldn't have posted the comment at all.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    http://www.autoblog.com/2013/01/10/chevy-filling-its-naias-stand-with-5-models-n- ot-sold-in-us/

    That's my brother's new ride, basically a compact SUV with a 3 row option.

    Buick Encore is a version of the Trax, so we're sort of getting that one.

    Watch, I'll get no response. People would rather argue about red and black dots, that thread gets 100 responses. :D
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Which one did he get?

    The pictures labels don't quite match. The picture with the Spin moniker on the tag is labeled a Chevrolet Sail above the thumbnail.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,156
    So, you are willing to compare a financially successful company like Nissan with an unproven startup like Solyndra.

    And there really is a difference between investing in a risky startup in the hopes of producing/jumpstarting a new industry capability (Solyndra) versus loaning or giving money to an old-technology company that has miserably failed to compete successfully with it's peers.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,156
    First the Sail, then the Spin. What next, the Descend? :P

    (Images of aircraft aerobatics in my head)
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