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GM News, New Models and Market Share

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  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    Also, gas is cheap, so I wonder if the whole 40mpg club is suffering?

    Could be. The Camry had a huge month. Maybe some people would rather have a 25/35mpg family sedan vs a 26/38mpg compact. Not to mention the Camry has a lot more power.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    edited December 2011
    LOL. The rear wing makes all the difference in the world;)
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    edited December 2011
    The only ones even worth considering for the MPG gains are the Sonata and Camry. You may want the TDI for the 700 mile range, though, or if diesel costs less in your region.

    The one thing the VW has the others don't is an available manual trans. I'd love to have a another TDI with a manual. I miss having a manual trans big time. My wife and I never bought a vehicle with an auto until we bought a minivan and SUVs.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited December 2011
    The Eco model can make sense, especially if gas prices creep up.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Good point, if you know how to drive stick, it's both cheaper and more fuel efficient.

    $26,765 with freight, and combined MPG goes up to 35mpg combined.

    Some quick math, 100/35*$4.09 = $11.69 fuel cost per 100 miles.

    You'd still need to drive it forever to make up the premium, but it's a diesel engine, so it might actually last forever, unlike the batteries on any of the hybrids. The engine would likely outlast the rest of the car.

    If I got a TDI it would be for the torque and the 700 mile range per tankful, not the $$$.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    Note to andres3:

    GM sold Saab, and that included the reserve for warranties, over a year ago.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    If I got a TDI it would be for the torque and the 700 mile range per tankful, not the $$$.

    I haven't driven a new Passat, but going by what I've read, I'd likely prefer how it drives over the Malibu Eco. Plus, I would appreciate and put value on the torque of the TDI and the enjoyment of driving a manual.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    edited December 2011
    You're only seven model years off the one I mentioned I had, and what you pictured is not a GT. Mine looked a lot like this one, without the rust bubbles and thankfully, without a spoiler:

    http://media.motortopia.com/files/15605/vehicle/4908b7f14ae39/P1010035.jpg

    Mine had a light beige corduroy interior, and it was my first car where you could fold either half of the back seat down, while stll carrying a passenger. It had a fold-down center armrest in the back, 2.8 V6 which was pretty peppy, cornered like it was on rails, and a nice swath of cloth on the door panels.

    Here's what I recall most Probes around here looking like, but with the silver painted wheel covers:

    http://www.esquire.com/cm/esquire/images/Ui/esq-03-1993-ford-probe-041211-lg.jpg- -
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    Um, that's not a Probe GT either.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    True...one had been pictured already. Balance, remember.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 9,663
    Is it just the aura of "German sedan" that's more memory than reality? I don't know.

    It's brand cache, value, and reputation. VW (despite all the stories of reliability issues) has nothing negative on the order of magnitude that GM and Chrysler (and Ford for that matter) do.

    People can be proud and happy and say I got a VW (and cheaper these days, so that they can afford it). It's like in the last decade with Sony starting to make cheap lower line Televisions so the masses could buy a Sony TV and say "I got a Sony" (only if they knew the real Sony's are the highest line ones they wouldn't be so happy).

    I think establishing a reputation for quality cars that are desireable and then later lowering the price (and perhaps some cost cutting) is a better business model than trying to go upmarket without any reputation or track record of positive light (GM/Chrysler/Ford) all trying to do that with improved interiors, supposedly improved cars, and such.

    I have first hand experience with BIG 3 crap, and an '87 Jetta. While the Jetta was far from reliable (when compared to a Toyota or Honda), that gaping gap in quality was equally large between the VW and the Dodge. The Dodge was a Grand Canyon gap away from being as reliable as the VW.

    So there you have it, there is positive, there is neutral, there is negative, and then there is extremely negative viewpoints (earned by Big 3).
    Toy '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD, Commuter '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6 Turbo FWD, Wife's '17 VW Golf All-Track SE 4-Motion AWD
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 9,663
    If the car had been done right, GM would've pulled off quite a coup in the subcompact market segment.

    And if a Corvette Z06 cost $15,000 brand new, there'd be one on my property.

    Lots of "IFS" in the world.

    One that comes to mind is, IF the Dodge didn't suck so bad every 4 months with a major breakdown, and IF the Dodge had some reasonable resale value on Trade-in, then maybe I'd of been able to consider a Ford or GM in my lifetime.
    Toy '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD, Commuter '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6 Turbo FWD, Wife's '17 VW Golf All-Track SE 4-Motion AWD
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    What was the price gap between a Neon and a Jetta back then? Just askin'. I have no idea.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    GM sold Saab, and that included the reserve for warranties, over a year ago.

    Where's that reserve now?

    GM pushed Saab off a cliff, watches them fall, and people who bought one while they were under GM ownership are outta luck?

    GM should step up and cover cars sold before Feb 2010.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,727
    edited December 2011
    What was the price gap between a Neon and a Jetta back then? Just askin'. I have no idea.

    The Jetta would have been more money for sure, particularly on the base and high end of the model lines I would guess. IIRC a base Neon was under $10k when it was introduced. I bought a new loaded '95 Neon Sport Coupe with the 2.0DOHC 150hp 4cyl and 5 speed manual (not that it had many options, fog lights, CD, Cruise, AC, and power locks etc) and IIRC it had an MSRP of 15k or so.

    Plus a Jetta would have been a much nicer car. I paid $21k in 2000 for a Jetta GLS TDI 5speed.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    Ask Saab what they did with the money.

    On another board there is vague talk about GM stepping up on at least some of the warranty cost, but if anyone here saw that, they've sure not said anything about it (shocker).
  • My point was that for such a "girly" car that you and Lemko think the Probe was, it's kind of funny how the Berretta was the one that came in hot pink... :D
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    Wow, the MSRP of your '95 Neon was quite a bit more than that of my '96 Cavalier 4-door 5-speed...by a couple thousand.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,944
    That's "Raspberry", a one-year color.

    BTW, it's "Beretta", not "Berretta".
  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,277
    edited December 2011
    My apologies to dictionary.com for my error...

    Raspberry, good. Cause I know penty of former GM owners who ended up with lemons... :lemon: :D
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