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Toy, Model & Collectible Replica Cars

1568101113

Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    The old Revell kits with color-molded bodies so you don't have to paint...I remember those. I think I had one, but I forget what the car was.

    There was another "compact" (or "manx cat" as I call those) kit made too, I forget the maker but I know I have seen it.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,374
    I also have a Dragon pre-painted(Daytona Violet) E36 M3. I have two other E36 Compact kits; a Dragon 316i and a Dragon 318ti Compact Cup race car. Neither are pre-painted.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited July 2011
    "Hot Wheels debuted in 1968 with a line of candy-colored hot rods that had special wheels that could spin fast. The die-cast cars had memorable names, such as Beatnik Bandit and King Kuda.

    The cars were marketed brilliantly and included a Hot Wheels performance segment with such offerings as the Plymouth Duster Thruster and special models like the Corvette Grand Sport. Mattel says that fewer than 130 models of the Grand Sport were ever produced, making it one of the most collectible Hot Wheels cars ever."

    Father of Hot Wheels Dead at 95 (Inside Line)

    image
  • There web site http://sizzlers-shop.com He got 1970 Hot Wheels Sizzler. He sold out 2006 Target Hot Wheels Sizzlers. At Taget Cars 2 Charge Ups. Same as Sizzlers. I have Cars 2 Chage Ups, Hot Wheels Sizzlers, Playing Mantis Sizzlers.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited November 2011
    Ralph Lauren Home Introduces Scale Models of Lauren's Personal Classic Cars (Inside Line)

    "The chosen cars are 1:8 scales of the Bugatti 57 SC Atlantic Coupe, which Lauren acquired in 1988. It was the last of the chassis built and ordered originally in 1937 by Richard B. Pope of London. The other models are a McLaren F1 LM, Ferrari 250 GTO and Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa."

    Nice stocking stuff for just $9,500. Each. :P

    image
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    I think that Bugatti was the one that Lauren spent $1million dollars to restore.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    And for only the price of a decent real car. I wonder where they are made. Edition better be very limited, or future prices will be amusing.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    That is a pretty big model.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    This is a really nice one: the Danbury Mint 1959 Pontiac Bonneville convertible. Please forgive my poor photography skills:

    image
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    Is this a porcelain one? I have some Danbury Mint Corvettes, along with a Corvette shelf. When I started ordering them I didn't realize they were made out of porcelain or some sort of a similiar material.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    edited December 2011
    I bought my son a bus set that came with two W210's, one a taxi cab, the other a normal version. Both plastic and about 1:43 scale, maybe a tad bigger. I think I play with my son's car toys as much as he does.

    image

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Those are odd to be in production today, I wonder who makes those, maybe New Bright or Welly or something
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    They're actually made by FastLane, a cheap toy company that makes products for Toys R Us. Some of their 1:64 scale cars almost look like knockoffs of older Matchbox. They also make car playsets and are quite reasonably priced.

    My son also has this parking garage that I regularly play with, made by same company.

    link title

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    edited December 2011
    Hmm...Matchbox made a ~1:64 W210 back in the day too, I wonder if this new version is kind of a "scaled up" copy.

    image

    When it comes to diecast, there seem to be no design rights - Matchbox was being copied almost from day one.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    No, this is a diecast. The odd lighting does make it look porcelain. I tried taking several shots, but this was the one that came out best.

    Here's a website with much better pictures of the model:

    Danbury Mint 1959 Pontiac
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Shoot, I still have that Matchbox E-Class and still in the original package no less!
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    I have a couple of those too, a silver one, and a darker one. Silver one is like this:

    image

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    edited December 2011
    I have the CLK cabrio variant, but not in package. Moderns will never be very collectible, so might as well get some play time in :shades:

    Oh yeah, speaking of collectible, I got another Matchbox 59 Impala - but I am selling it:

    image
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Here's an odd new casting - a Johnny Lightning Citation. I can't imagine this being a brisk seller:

    image
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    Haha, I've been seeing the oddest scale toy cars lately, like 82 Accords, Tempos, Gremlins, Pintos. and other shitboxes from the 70's and 80s.

    I'm tempted to buy them but just don't have the room. They're all made by "Fresh Cherries" and I usually see them in Walmert at about $3/pop.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Oh man, I gotta find that diecast car and get it for my friend! He had a 1980 Citation that took him through high school, college, graduate school, and into the first year of his marriage!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Sounds like he had the most durable 1980 Citation ever

    I have seen those "Cherries" models too, who wants a toy Tempo?
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,374
    edited January 2012
    image

    I'm still buying every E36/5 variant that I can find; usually 1:87 Wikings or 1:43 Schucos- I think I have all of the Dragon 1:24 plastic kits(although I may yet buy another 318ti kit as well as an E36 M3 kit and create a replica of my Club Sport).

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Okay men, help me out here in a project I wish to undertake.

    I've decided that I'd like to collect models of every car I've ever owned (at least the ones i can remember) :P .

    This represents a LOT of cars (quite a few were "flippers" that I only had for weeks, but I drove all of them). I don't really want models of *every* car but most of 'em.

    Now then, my considerations are:

    1. Space--I need a scale that is plausible for a collection of what I think will hit close to 100

    2. Availability-- most of these cars will be 1955 on up, American and foreign

    3. Cost -- I really don't want to be spending $69 a model here, as you can well imagine.

    Any ideas on scale, which model maker or makers might cover most of my needs?

    "Accuracy" or quality are not so important, but of course, I don't want trash.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Tough question. It will all depend on the cars themselves. Although the diecast market has never been larger, there are still model cars that more or less don't exist yet. Still can't get a diecast of a W210 E55 AMG, for example.

    Of course, smaller scale takes up less space. Many space-limited collectors don't go bigger than 1:43 - I have few models larger than that, myself. You can fit an awful lot of 1:64-ish models in a small place.

    Cost is random. Many 1:43 models are much more expensive than 1:18 models. Some vintage 1:64 models, if a rare variety, can be worth as much as the real cars themselves, or even more.

    Really, it will all come down to what car you want to have in miniature, and how availability is from there. There are affordable models available of most iconic cars, but some things (say you want a model of a Chevy Celebrity or a 96 Cougar) will be next to impossible.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Okay, let's presume 1:43. Here are some typical cars from my past

    Jaguar XK140
    MGA
    MGB
    Morgan
    Jaguar 3.8 MK II
    '63 Riviera
    '66 Old Toronado
    '55 Studebaker President 2D HT
    47 Chevy Fleetmaster coupe
    '48 Packard convertible
    Triumph TR 250
    Triumph TR6
    Porsche 356B
    '64 GTO hardtop
    '63 Studebaker GT Hawk
    '56 Packard Golden Hawk
    61 Mercedes 220Sb
    '52 Mercedes 220b Cabriolet
    '63 checker marathon
    Mercedes 280SL
    '69 Pontiac Bonneville
    Duster 340 (??)
    '59 Chevy convertible
    '56 Chevy wagon

    I got lots more but you get the idea :P
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    For all of the sportscars you list, you'll have no problem finding many current and vintage models in many scales and price ranges. A google or ebay search will reveal a lot. I am sure most of the American cars exist in diecast form too.

    A few small details will be difficult - what if you can get a 49 Packard instead of a 48? Or a 48 Chevy instead of a 47? Or any Marathon? Of all those you list, I only see a real difficulty in the 55 Studebaker and the 69 Bonneville - but they might exist too.

    If you want them all in the same scale, that could be problematic.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    yeah I would want them in the same scale. I don't care if it's a '48 or 49--I'm not even sure on some of the cars I've owned what the year was anymore (loss of oxygen to the brain I suspect).

    What's the best keywords for searching for 1:43 on eBay?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Scale might be tough on a few, especially the muscle cars which seem more common in 1:18. But 1:43 seems to the most popular these days - so you'll get the vast majority of those. Most will be attainable for under $50, as well.

    I'd go into the diecast section, enter the name of the car, and just search - sometimes sellers don't list things properly.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    What's a typical price for a somewhat less then perfect example of a common car? I'm thinking I'm going to need about 150 models to re-create my chaotic and incoherent past.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Here's a link to the basic ebay diecast section, searches can be made from here

    Most items you find will be new in box, 1:43 there will probably average $15-35 apiece. So, it will not be the cheapest collection, but will be insane when you are finished.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    What's the approx length of a 1;43?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    A 1:43 560SEL I have is roughly 4.5" long
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,374
    What fintail said; go with 1:43. I'd be extremely surprised if you couldn't find virtually all of your cars in that scale- although prices will vary wildly.
    In my opinion 1:43 scale is the "sweet spot" for collectors- small enough to keep a large collection manageable but still large enough to include a remarkable amount of detail(although I have a 1:87 Herpa BMW 7er with an opening hood and a remarkably detailed engine).

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Hmmm....but 150 of those is going to take up a LOT of space :surprise: I was hoping that 1:43 would be about 2.5 inches long. That would be the ideal length for my small-ish house.

    We're talkin' 56 feet of cars here!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    You should park them at an angle, not sideways bumper to bumper. That way each car should only take about that 2.5".

    150 cars is a considerable collection, and will require some good shelving too. Open up the wallet ;)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Okay I have a shelf space 70" long by 12" deep...so you're good at this...how many 1:43 models do you think I could display (2 deep of course).
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    Should be easy - cars 2 deep, each car gets say around 2.75" - you could get about 50 cars on that shelf. 3 of those shelves would do the collection.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    don't forget, I need room to open the doors :P

    Well 50 cars would be a good start--I don't have to build anything right away then. I know I've owned more than 50 cars but it might take me a while to remember them all---and there are a few that I might never wish to gaze upon again, even at 1:43...even a 43rd of the rage would be too much.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    I'd think 50 cars would be a good start. A cabinet or shelf with sliding glass doors would probably be most efficient.

    Here's a nice reliable :shades: Saab 900 Turbo in 1:43 to get you started, you had one of these, right?

    image
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    oh god yes...three of them. Of my entire car history, over all these years, including cars dragged out of wrecking yards, cars given to me, cars found abandoned, ....none...NONE...were worse than those 3 Saab turbos. Even the FIATS were better.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    There appears to be several variants of 1:43 Saab Turbos out there...you should get a few :P
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,374
    edited January 2012
    To give you an idea of the display space needed for 1:43 cars, here's @1/3 of my collection on display in my old office:

    image

    And a couple of close ups; the larger cars are 1:43:

    image

    image

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Wow that's a nicely thought out display.

    I know this is probably blasphemous, but do I REALLY need to keep them in the boxes? I'd rather just have them out there naked.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    edited January 2012
    Many modern 1:43 cars come with bases and covers. They can be removed easily. On modern items, I wouldn't sweat the boxes too much, or at most, fold them down and store them somewhere.

    If you find anything vintage, be sure to keep the box, which is often worth as much as the model.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Is "vintage" related to the age of the model (I presume). How would I know if something is "vintage"? I mean, when is "old" OLD in a model like this?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,564
    I look at anything made before around 1990 as being vintage, and worthy of saving the packaging. Chances are you'll have few or none of this age in your collection.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Okay I'm going to sit down and make out a list of cars that I remember owning.

    I think, to be fair, I will only include cars actually registered in my name, not the ones where I jumped the title.

    A couple of them are going to be tough I bet. What are my chances of finding a 1:43 of a Subaru FF1 sedan? How about an Audi 100LS?
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    edited January 2012
    I think 1:43 is a good scale like others mentioned, but I think it would be easier and cheaper to find them in 1:64 scale although quality would not be as good obviously.

    If you go 1:64 scale, you can find them made by many different brands including Hot Wheels, Matchbox, and Majorette and you can probably find them cheap too, but they won't have as big of a visual impact as larger models.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Well that's a good thought. Accuracy is really not high on my agenda--it's more about 'body count" actually; nonetheless it would be nice to recognize the cars without having to pick them up.

    About how long is a typical 1:64?
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