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Vacation Travel Plans, Suggestions, Advice

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  • michaellnomichaellno Posts: 4,300
    I was going to recommend that you beer connoisseurs attend this, but I discovered that it's sold out already.

    Nothing like having 2200 different beers to sample.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Too bad I don't like beer. Just got back from a walk along the beach listening to the waves crash. Good atmosphere for a cold one.

    Guess I'll settle for a gin & tonic in a bit. :shades:
  • fezofezo Manahawkin, NJPosts: 10,376
    Waves crashing in Idaho? The oceans ARE rising....

    Speaking of rising oceans, I'm five miles inland. Close enough for an entertaining storm but far enough away for real damage.

    Last week at this time I was on the Outer Banks. What a difference a week makes....
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited September 2010
    Actually we recently sold our house and left Idaho, so we're on an extended vacation until we find another place to live (well, we're exploring new country but I'm working - ah, the joys of a portable job).

    We did head for a place that may be less affected by global warming than Boise (droughts won't be an issue here at least).
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425
    If you want to avoid a state income tax, avoid Oregon. The best of both worlds could be in Vancouver, WA for you. Enjoy your looking. :)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Parts of No. California are very nice---city of Sonoma is about as far away from the Bay Area as you want to be---nice town and it's off the traffic-packed 101 corridor. You might also like San Luis Obispo which is nearer to Santa Barbara but not so expensive. These are temperate climates, and there's work in many parts of California. I think California is the best place on earth and I have been to a *lot* of places on earth. :)
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 130,977
    This sounds like something I've heard before....

    "Let me tell y'all a story about a man named Jed... "

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  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited September 2010
    I never have lived my life worrying about tax consequences. I think it all pretty much evens out, with the exception of NY state or California perhaps.

    I really like Salem. :-)

    Joe, we checked out San Luis Obispo and the Tri-Tip area on our last California trip. SLO is a bit pricey and all the 4 lanes discouraged us. It was hard to get anywhere around town without popping onto a freeway. I love California but my wife is from San Diego with stints in Santa Cruz and the Bay Area, and she keeps wanting to try different spots. So ... we're sure in a different spot currently. ;)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Did you ever look at Sonoma closely? Nice little town, very friendly, without the California weirdness. Has a very small town feel. Warm summers, mild winters, and quite unlike the other CA cities you mentioned.

    Colorado is quite interesting---maybe you're a Glenwood Springs kinda guy? Nowhere near as pricey as nearby Snowmass/Aspen, but not as desolate and ugly as Grand Junction. And you have Moab, etc within driving distance, and maybe 3.5 hours to Denver. Or perhaps Carbondale, further up the valley towards Snowmass. I'm not a big fan of the more isolated western slope communities, and the Front Range cities like Boulder--well, they are just too too precious, or if not precious Boulder, than too suburban (like Lafayette and Denver suburbs). Actually I like this little town 12 miles outside of Boulder called Niwot.

    New Mexico--well, you know that, and Nevada is best suited as an atomic test site.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Yeah, CO holds a lot of interest and even some of the Denver burbs have caught our eye. And I've always liked SW Colorado too (amazing how many people living there have never heard of or been to Marble).

    We're trying a small town right now and that's going to be different for us.This stop is just going to be a way station before the next one.
  • tallman1tallman1 Posts: 1,874
    We were impressed when we visited Colorado Springs on vacation last month. Little Manitou Springs next door was unique too. Still pretty close to Denver if you need the big city once in awhile.

    My wife is ready to move there when the kids are gone in a couple of years... I'm trying to keep my western WA heels dug in though. ;)
  • kernickkernick Posts: 4,072
    A few years back I read about Mesquite, NV which is on the Utah border right off I-15. I stopped there on the way to Zion for a few hours, and it seemed nice enough; though it's economy is based around a few casinos and tourism in general. It was also supposed to be a retirement destination as it's a few degrees cooler than Vegas. Current pop. is around 20K.

    Good to rent in a new area, before buying! That probably applies to vehicles also. I recently rented a mid-size Dodge, that I can't even remember it's name. 1 day was enough with that appliance.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    My wife had family in Carson City for a few years and we always enjoyed visiting down there. Tahoe was just over the hill and you could hit the shows in Reno but the pace was calmer.

    Where we are visiting right now, the rental situation is woeful unfortunately. Maybe a lease/purchase would work out though.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Carson City is more CA than NV, because it's so close---just like northern Italy is kinda German :)

    Reno is tacky.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    What, you didn't like the Dodge Avenger? Well, just wait for the '11, when it gets an upgraded interior and the new Pentastar 3.6 V6!
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    You should check out beautiful and exciting places like central Illinois, Indiana and northern Ohio.
  • berriberri Posts: 10,166
    Are you talking about Salem, OR.? One thing there, all the beautiful flowers and vegetation can help you forget its drizzling outside.

    Vancouver, WA is alright, if a bit industrial, as long as you don't have to make a daily commute into Portland from there!
  • berriberri Posts: 10,166
    You should check out beautiful and exciting places like central Illinois, Indiana and northern Ohio.

    Well, they're nice in October and the often flat roads give you good fuel mileage.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    Hey, good point right about the fuel mileage. As for the fall foliage, yeah, sort of, but there's better. Parts of Wisconsin have absolutely gorgeous colors in October. I've never been to Vermont when the leaves change colors, but I highly recommend south central Wisconsin in the fall. The numerous pristine lakes and hills just add to the beautiful.

    One of these Octobers I want to go to Vermont. It's been on my "places to see" list for years, but I just haven't done it.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    I actually lived in Wisconsin for about six months back in the 80's. Loved the fish fries and the farmer's markets. And the brats. Used to have a Bucky Badger sticker on my old Tercel too. :shades:

    After hitting all the states, all the territories and provinces in Canada (except Nunavut - that's still on my bucket list), and around half the Mexican states, I think I'd be pretty happy living most anywhere. Lots of great spots all over North America.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    In my junior year in college, back when humans dwelled in caves, four of us drove from Madison to Acapulco and back during winter break. Today, sad to say, the only vehicle I'd consider driving in Mexico would be a tank with extra armor plating. And, I'd want to be in a convoy.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    The only time I drove down there I was in a rental Neon in northern Baja. Almost got stuck in deep sand taking a shortcut across a dry lake bed.

    You can get anywhere down there on a bus or cab, for cheap. We'd rarely wait more than 10 or 15 minutes to catch a bus to the next town.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 11,077
    where we are this weekend. Too bad you can't see the tall can of Modelo in his hand behind my back. Guess he was going for the full "real Elvis" (the later years) experience.

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  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425
    Additional reasons for considering Vancouver, WA is knowing how much you snowboard. Mt. Hood's Timberline, Hood Meadows, & Ski Bowl are just across the creek & up the hill. In other months the Columbia is great for boating. East Vancouver residence is close to the Glen Jackson Bridge leading to the airport. I know you like to pay taxes, but they can be considerably more in OR. The moderate climate includes showers, but rain you don't have to shovel. :)
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 130,977
    Modelo?

    I'm guessing that isn't Memphis? lol...

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  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Looks like the Viva Las Vegas outfit.

    How's the damp in Vancouver? We've only driven through there a few times but never really explored the city. My wife had trouble the summer she lived on Vashon Island and keeps steering me away from coastal WA and OR.
  • tallman1tallman1 Posts: 1,874
    If your wife doesn't like the damp of Vashon, she won't like Vancouver. My wife is from New Mexico and lived in eastern Washington for several years. She is having a tough time living in western WA right now. :)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    edited September 2010
    I think the Palouse region has fairly ideal weather, and isn't a bad place if one is nearing or at retirement. Not as dusty and gang-infested as the Columbia Basin (although not all of it is bad), slightly milder weather too, cheap housing, 4 actual seasons - not 10 months of mist and fog + 2 months of what is admittedly the best summer weather in the country, and even some decent roads. I'll be heading over there in about a month to visit people, should be a nice drive.
  • tallman1tallman1 Posts: 1,874
    I'm heading to the Palouse next weekend. Go Cougs. :)

    Not sure if most would describe that region as having ideal weather though. Some don't like the cold and snow. ;)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    2 months of occasional snow or 6 months of 51F and light rain. Pick your poison :shades:
  • tallman1tallman1 Posts: 1,874
    Hmmm, 2 months? More like October through March when I was there. I loved the snow though. And not much can beat the spring.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    You can't beat Colorado front range weather, or central coast in California--neither exhibits extremes.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    OK, maybe three months. I remember in my youth anyway the snow would come and go. And a key difference is 3" of snow there doesn't create armageddon like it does west of the mountains. I spent part of my childhood on the other side, and I do miss the fun winters, and lack of rain. I like the scenery too.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    The weather in the west-of-the-mountains Pacific Northwest has no extremes either - other than constant rainfall most of the year. Like the idea of 30-40 consecutive days of measurable rain? Happens almost every winter.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    that sounds extreme to me!

    Maybe that's what I was trying to say---that the weather on the Central CAL coast or the Colorado Front Range is constantly "variable". No one condition just digs in and stays there day after day after day. :(
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    Longterm variability is fun - like an actual difference in seasons. But warm one day and snowing the next...it would be annoying. I just like the idea of less rain...easier to keep my car clean :shades:
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    edited September 2010
    Highly over-rated, especially the "season" called winter. Oh, it's nice when you're skiiing and all that, but living in it in Vermont? No thanks. And having a fire hose turned on your windows in Seattle for 3 months is another season I can do without.
  • fezofezo Manahawkin, NJPosts: 10,376
    I could do without winter and not mind it even one little bit.

    I do like looking at snow but am far too old to be shoveling it, thanks.

    I lived in Tallahassee for a year. That agreed pretty well with me - though Florida rain is like no other. If we get an inch in a day that's rainly. In Florida an inch of rain is partly cloudy.
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    There are a lots of enjoyable places for vacationing, including most of the places mentioned in this discussion. The number of wonderful choices for putting down roots is far more limited. Much depends on where family and friends are located. These trump climate for me.
  • fezofezo Manahawkin, NJPosts: 10,376
    Family and friends keep me here in Jersey. I'm within a couple of hours of everybody.

    Other things enter into it. With my health I can't live too far away from really good medical facilities which rules out, say, the Outer Banks where the only hospital has 19 beds and the good places are three hours away.

    I'm not to where I have to pay in advance for a three minute egg or anything but I'm higher maintenance than most.
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited September 2010
    Guys I know who retired to Mexico take two aspirin and get on an airplane when they get sick.

    Of course, I have a couple of other friends who head that direction for medical tourism.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    Interesting that you should mention the Americans who retired in Mexico, because I've been thinking about those folks recently. I don't know of any personally, but I know that a good number of U.S. citizens retired in Mexico. I wonder what the inflow versus the outflow of retirees has been in the last couple of years, in view of the increase in narco crime.
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425
    "Go Cougs"

    If they don't fumble the hand off on their first possession, you'll see a small miracle.

    Last time I was on the Hill was 05 for our 50th Class Reunion and I haven't any desire to return soon.

    Wish you a great weekend. :)
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    I dunno - seems to be plenty of that in the states too, though perhaps more property crime than deadly drug wars between the gangs. I've had stuff stolen in Memphis, St. Louis and got pick-pocketed in Mexico City, and I'd go back to Mexico City tomorrow if I had the chance. I'd just stay off the subway this time. :shades:

    Not having much facility in picking up languages, I never much wanted to be an ex-pat (unless we went to Newfoundland perhaps).
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    edited September 2010
    If I had a substantial independent cash flow, I think I'd move to/retire in Switzerland.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    I think about 2 million Americans now live in Mexico.

    Switzerland---well god bless you, but the Swiss, as efficient and clever as they are, would drive me crazy with their fussiness and hard-nosed pragmatism.

    When you drive from Switzerland to Italy, it's like when the color of the movie changes in the Wizard of Oz.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    edited September 2010
    Hey, at least they are less OCD about pointless regulation than the Germans - I love driving in Germany due to the all around level of skill, but I can't stand the litigiousness (it's almost as bad as the US), the bleeding heart movements, and the embrace of asinine public sector style red tape. Switzerland may look bland, but it is fairly low key, very scenic, the standard of living is very high, and the Swiss still have the guts to stick up for themselves. Also, I like some of the food :shades: So, I could live in Switzerland (or Liechtenstein) and take driving vacations to Germany. Sounds good, need to start buying lottery tickets :shades:

    Italy is fun...to visit...but it'd be a lot less developed without the economic benefits gained via its northern neighbors, IMHO.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    I'd like to live in a foreign country actually, and retire there, but NOT in an ex-pat community.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,244
    edited September 2010
    Same here. Expat stuff is not really genuine, and you learn a lot less. If I wanted it to be like home, I wouldn't have moved.

    I'd love to live in a place like where a Swiss friend of mine lives. Tiny hamlet (population <100) adjacent to another village (population maybe 300) near the German border. Idyllic little place, no stores apart from a couple little restaurants. But there's a town 5 minutes away with all shopping amenities and medical care, or you can drive 10 minutes, go into Germany, and shop cheaper. A decent sized town (population ~40K) is about 20 minutes away, and Zurich is an hour away by car maybe slightly longer by transit. I could deal with living in any of those.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Worn out today looking for the eagle's nest along the beach. Never was able to spot it. We did get a good look at the adult eagle sailing along the shoreline.
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