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2013 Scion FR-S Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,126
edited September 2014 in Scion

image2013 Scion FR-S Long-Term Road Test

Memorial Day approaching, we used our 2013 Scion FR-S to transport outdoor grilling necessities.

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Comments

  • akula1akula1 Posts: 0
    What happened that you had to pull up the left side of the trunk liner to leave that atrocious fit/finish?
  • stovt001_stovt001_ Posts: 799
    A bag of charcoal would be safer and make the food taste better. Just saying...
  • hybrishybris Posts: 365
    As a trained propane service tech I can tell you even if you can't get anymore propane out of a tank to light your grill there are still enough vapors to dangerously pressurize your tanks.

    So in the end NEVER transport a propane tank on its side even if it is "empty".
  • jederinojederino Posts: 0
    These can stay upright in the backseat floors, right? Cavemen have been doing this for millenia...
  • stovt001_stovt001_ Posts: 799
    I don't know anything about propane. Why is laying it on its side a problem?
  • darthbimmerdarthbimmer Posts: 606
    As I scrolled down the page I initially caught only a glimpse of the picture and my immediate thought was, "Tanks in the trunk? HOT DANG they're starting real mods on that FR-S!!" But then I saw it was just propane for tanks for the barbecue grill. Bummer.
  • Isn't it true that empty containers of flammable materials are more dangerous than full containers?
  • hybrishybris Posts: 365
    @stovt001 The reason why you never lay propane tanks down is because the pressure relief valve is on top and it is designed to only work when upright. Thus when a tank is on it side instead of releasing the minute amount of propane vapor pressure it build
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