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Camry V6. 1994

mymo94mymo94 MDPosts: 4
edited August 2016 in Toyota
Hi. A few weeks ago, my Camry 3.0 refused to accelerate from a intersection after stopping for a red. The check engine light was on. Every time I attempted to go, it cut off. Immediately restarted, ran smoothly while at idle. Would not even allow higher rpm' sin neutral. Had it towed home. Didn't go back to car for about a week. Had someone to use diagnostic tool to see what problem was becauseofcheck engine light. No light on,car is running perfectly,no history shown on tool to trouble shoot or get a code. I'm afraid to leave neighborhood not knowing when or where it will rear itsuglyhead again. Any history of this ? I've heard about possibility of one of the two sensors,but not knowing which one or of indeed one or both are bad seems a bit much. Thanks for any insight that you can provide.

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Answers

  • cskicski West Springfield, VAPosts: 1,563
    mymo94 said:

    Hi. A few weeks ago, my Camry 3.0 refused to accelerate from a intersection after stopping for a red. The check engine light was on. Every time I attempted to go, it cut off. Immediately restarted, ran smoothly while at idle. Would not even allow higher rpm' sin neutral. Had it towed home. Didn't go back to car for about a week. Had someone to use diagnostic tool to see what problem was becauseofcheck engine light. No light on,car is running perfectly,no history shown on tool to trouble shoot or get a code. I'm afraid to leave neighborhood not knowing when or where it will rear itsuglyhead again. Any history of this ? I've heard about possibility of one of the two sensors,but not knowing which one or of indeed one or both are bad seems a bit much. Thanks for any insight that you can provide.

    Did they have to jump start it after it sat there for a week? That would explain the "forgotten" code. Who takes a week to diagnose a car??? Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free, but you gotta get that code UNLESS the computer is going bad...and if you think about it- How many computers have you replaced since 1994? LMAO

    Chris Skalski: Network Engineer 2012 Kia Optima EX

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    edited August 2016
    Here's a VIDEO that shows you how to read diagnostic codes on an OBD-I system. Most modern scan tools that most people are likely to have, can't read OBD-1
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,114
    cski said:

    Who takes a week to diagnose a car???

    In the OP's case no-one, he didn't bother with looking at it right away, then when he had someone help him check it out it was a week later and no longer acting up. Then there are times when a car exhibits a symptom that isn't repeatable on demand and may only occur once or twice a week, or a month. It can take a long time to figure out something like that, but it takes patience and a good game plan.
    cski said:

    Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free,

    No they don't. Anyone who does something like that for free would be saying exactly what their time, and training are worth.

    From your first response.
    cski said:

    Oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or it could be the computer. I would try cheapest first. Also, when is the last time you inspected your intake system? Have you replaced your air filter lately? Also, you may need to run it from park back into drive and make sure the parking sensor is not still engaged. \

    Seriously? I hope the OP doesn't follow your advice and start shot-gunning parts aimlessly. There isn't a more expensive way to try to fix a car than to start guessing like that.
    cski said:


    The only place that is going to be able to fix this is the dealer or a Toyota/Honda shop that has been open for 30+ years.

    Again, not true. There are a lot of technicians (independents) that can handle this system even without all of the sophistication that they are used to seeing today.
    cski said:


    Ok, if selling is not an option I would start with the Oxygen sensor and Mass Airflow Sensor. They get covered with goo over time and stop sending the computer the right answers. It will start out intermittently cutting out, revving up and down on its own, and throwing a code. A new o2 sensor is $25 and a MAS is probably nearly the same. Spend $20 bucks on a new air filter while you're at it and you can then see if that solved the problem. It will certainly get cleaner air into the engine and the new sensors will give the computer the right information. What stumps me is why didn't the computer keep the code? Is it time sensitive? Has the computer (ECU) ever been replaced? Because after cheap intake sensors I would be looking for a new ECU. Thats all for now.

    Just imagine the time and money you have told the O.P. to waste if the issue turns out to be a fuel pump, ignition coil, cap and rotor (plug wires), or ?????

  • mymo94mymo94 MDPosts: 4
    Thanks thecardoc3 for understanding.
    It took that long because I really don't drive it often ( sentimental holding on, moms car)
    Really want to make it trustworthy though.
    Runs so damn good e crept for this once. Yes I did have computer changed about 4 months ago. Again don't drive often.

    Q

    cski said:

    Who takes a week to diagnose a car???

    In the OP's case no-one, he didn't bother with looking at it right away, then when he had someone help him check it out it was a week later and no longer acting up. Then there are times when a car exhibits a symptom that isn't repeatable on demand and may only occur once or twice a week, or a month. It can take a long time to figure out something like that, but it takes patience and a good game plan.
    cski said:

    Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free,

    No they don't. Anyone who does something like that for free would be saying exactly what their time, and training are worth.

    From your first response.
    cski said:

    Oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or it could be the computer. I would try cheapest first. Also, when is the last time you inspected your intake system? Have you replaced your air filter lately? Also, you may need to run it from park back into drive and make sure the parking sensor is not still engaged. \

    Seriously? I hope the OP doesn't follow your advice and start shot-gunning parts aimlessly. There isn't a more expensive way to try to fix a car than to start guessing like that.
    cski said:


    The only place that is going to be able to fix this is the dealer or a Toyota/Honda shop that has been open for 30+ years.

    Again, not true. There are a lot of technicians (independents) that can handle this system even without all of the sophistication that they are used to seeing today.
    cski said:


    Ok, if selling is not an option I would start with the Oxygen sensor and Mass Airflow Sensor. They get covered with goo over time and stop sending the computer the right answers. It will start out intermittently cutting out, revving up and down on its own, and throwing a code. A new o2 sensor is $25 and a MAS is probably nearly the same. Spend $20 bucks on a new air filter while you're at it and you can then see if that solved the problem. It will certainly get cleaner air into the engine and the new sensors will give the computer the right information. What stumps me is why didn't the computer keep the code? Is it time sensitive? Has the computer (ECU) ever been replaced? Because after cheap intake sensors I would be looking for a new ECU. Thats all for now.

    Just imagine the time and money you have told the O.P. to waste if the issue turns out to be a fuel pump, ignition coil, cap and rotor (plug wires), or ?????

    cski said:

    Who takes a week to diagnose a car???

    In the OP's case no-one, he didn't bother with looking at it right away, then when he had someone help him check it out it was a week later and no longer acting up. Then there are times when a car exhibits a symptom that isn't repeatable on demand and may only occur once or twice a week, or a month. It can take a long time to figure out something like that, but it takes patience and a good game plan.
    cski said:

    Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free,

    No they don't. Anyone who does something like that for free would be saying exactly what their time, and training are worth.

    From your first response.
    cski said:

    Oxygen sensor, mass air flow sensor, or it could be the computer. I would try cheapest first. Also, when is the last time you inspected your intake system? Have you replaced your air filter lately? Also, you may need to run it from park back into drive and make sure the parking sensor is not still engaged. \

    Seriously? I hope the OP doesn't follow your advice and start shot-gunning parts aimlessly. There isn't a more expensive way to try to fix a car than to start guessing like that.
    cski said:


    The only place that is going to be able to fix this is the dealer or a Toyota/Honda shop that has been open for 30+ years.

    Again, not true. There are a lot of technicians (independents) that can handle this system even without all of the sophistication that they are used to seeing today.
    cski said:


    Ok, if selling is not an option I would start with the Oxygen sensor and Mass Airflow Sensor. They get covered with goo over time and stop sending the computer the right answers. It will start out intermittently cutting out, revving up and down on its own, and throwing a code. A new o2 sensor is $25 and a MAS is probably nearly the same. Spend $20 bucks on a new air filter while you're at it and you can then see if that solved the problem. It will certainly get cleaner air into the engine and the new sensors will give the computer the right information. What stumps me is why didn't the computer keep the code? Is it time sensitive? Has the computer (ECU) ever been replaced? Because after cheap intake sensors I would be looking for a new ECU. Thats all for now.

    Just imagine the time and money you have told the O.P. to waste if the issue turns out to be a fuel pump, ignition coil, cap and rotor (plug wires), or ?????

  • mymo94mymo94 MDPosts: 4
    cski said:

    mymo94 said:

    Hi. A few weeks ago, my Camry 3.0 refused to accelerate from a intersection after stopping for a red. The check engine light was on. Every time I attempted to go, it cut off. Immediately restarted, ran smoothly while at idle. Would not even allow higher rpm' sin neutral. Had it towed home. Didn't go back to car for about a week. Had someone to use diagnostic tool to see what problem was becauseofcheck engine light. No light on,car is running perfectly,no history shown on tool to trouble shoot or get a code. I'm afraid to leave neighborhood not knowing when or where it will rear itsuglyhead again. Any history of this ? I've heard about possibility of one of the two sensors,but not knowing which one or of indeed one or both are bad seems a bit much. Thanks for any insight that you can provide.

    Did they have to jump start it after it sat there for a week? That would explain the "forgotten" code. Who takes a week to diagnose a car??? Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free, but you gotta get that code UNLESS the computer is going bad...and if you think about it- How many computers have you replaced since 1994? LMAO
    cski said:

    mymo94 said:

    Hi. A few weeks ago, my Camry 3.0 refused to accelerate from a intersection after stopping for a red. The check engine light was on. Every time I attempted to go, it cut off. Immediately restarted, ran smoothly while at idle. Would not even allow higher rpm' sin neutral. Had it towed home. Didn't go back to car for about a week. Had someone to use diagnostic tool to see what problem was becauseofcheck engine light. No light on,car is running perfectly,no history shown on tool to trouble shoot or get a code. I'm afraid to leave neighborhood not knowing when or where it will rear itsuglyhead again. Any history of this ? I've heard about possibility of one of the two sensors,but not knowing which one or of indeed one or both are bad seems a bit much. Thanks for any insight that you can provide.

    Did they have to jump start it after it sat there for a week? That would explain the "forgotten" code. Who takes a week to diagnose a car??? Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free, but you gotta get that code UNLESS the computer is going bad...and if you think about it- How many computers have you replaced since 1994? LMAO
    cski said:

    mymo94 said:

    Hi. A few weeks ago, my Camry 3.0 refused to accelerate from a intersection after stopping for a red. The check engine light was on. Every time I attempted to go, it cut off. Immediately restarted, ran smoothly while at idle. Would not even allow higher rpm' sin neutral. Had it towed home. Didn't go back to car for about a week. Had someone to use diagnostic tool to see what problem was becauseofcheck engine light. No light on,car is running perfectly,no history shown on tool to trouble shoot or get a code. I'm afraid to leave neighborhood not knowing when or where it will rear itsuglyhead again. Any history of this ? I've heard about possibility of one of the two sensors,but not knowing which one or of indeed one or both are bad seems a bit much. Thanks for any insight that you can provide.

    Did they have to jump start it after it sat there for a week? That would explain the "forgotten" code. Who takes a week to diagnose a car??? Most places do it for free while you wait. Heck, the DEALER will diagnose it for free, but you gotta get that code UNLESS the computer is going bad...and if you think about it- How many computers have you replaced since 1994? LMAO
  • If you never determined what the problem was have the Camshaft Position Sensor tested. Symptoms very indicative of CPS going bad.
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