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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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Comments

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 14,335
    Saw a 1968 Nova street machine- custom paint and tubbed. Not my cup of tea but well done.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,628
    edited November 2020
    Saw an early Ford Probe today, maybe a Turbo as it seemed to have cladding, and had the 3 spoke wheels. Sadly, it was looking pretty rough, and someone had rattle-canned the wheels. Also saw an early 00s retro Thunderbird.

    Looking at real estate ads earlier today, I viewed a listing of a one-owner 1959 house in Bellevue, and the listing featured period pics with a couple of not the most common cars. I thought these were kind of neat:

    image

    image

    Only one modern day exterior pic was in the listing:

    image

    And none of the interior, as it was being advertised as a gut reno or a teardown. Good but not the trendiest neighborhood, maybe a difficult lot, it can be yours for roughly a cool million even (and could be asking for a bidding war at that).
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 40,808
    man, that landscaping really grew in over the last 60 years! Cool house though.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537
    A chainsaw would be the perfect housewarming gift for the new owners.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 24,367
    That is a cool house, but I couldn't imagine trying to maneuver a big car around on that tiny patch of asphalt. I don't mind the thick vegetation, although it needs to be cleared back from the house some. That kind of landscaping around these parts would be very high maintenance, though. It wouldn't take much time at all for it to get strangled off with various vines. One of the worst offenders is a vine one of my elderly relatives called "Bittersweet".
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 15,389
    Not a fan of that front door with the oval window on a house that is just about all rectangles.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT, 2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited November 2020
    Funny how mid-century modern has become 'in', when I can remember it was considered waaaay 'out'. I kind-of like it in general, but since I like the era of cars, no surprise of course.

    Around here, I was never a fan of houses on lots that were lower than the street. I always wondered about drainage. That might be all for naught though.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 25,395
    fintail said:

    Saw an early Ford Probe today, maybe a Turbo as it seemed to have cladding, and had the 3 spoke wheels. Sadly, it was looking pretty rough, and someone had rattle-canned the wheels. Also saw an early 00s retro Thunderbird.

    Looking at real estate ads earlier today, I viewed a listing of a one-owner 1959 house in Bellevue, and the listing featured period pics with a couple of not the most common cars. I thought these were kind of neat:

    image


    And none of the interior, as it was being advertised as a gut reno or a teardown. Good but not the trendiest neighborhood, maybe a difficult lot, it can be yours for roughly a cool million even (and could be asking for a bidding war at that).

    The '55 Chev wagons are rare in this area, at least if there are any, they are not showing up at cruise ins and car shows. The '56 models show up some, especially the Nomad models.



    2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT, 2015 Cruze 2LT,

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537

    Not a fan of that front door with the oval window on a house that is just about all rectangles.

    That was a later replacement of course as the original had a slab door with no window. Also interesting to see how the carport became a garage fairly early in its life. I like the look of the carport better but understand why the owners might have wanted the change. Also interesting to see the area to the right of the front door originally was all glass but now has an attempt at mid-century latticework there.

    With all that asphalt sloping downhill towards the house I do wonder about drainage.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 24,367

    Around here, I was never a fan of houses on lots that were lower than the street. I always wondered about drainage. That might be all for naught though.

    Same here. In fact, when I was house hunting a few years back, I refused to consider any houses were in any kind of a low spot on the property, because of drainage concerns.

    I also avoided houses that were too high up on a hill, with steep driveways that looked like they'd be a ton of fun in snow and ice.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited November 2020
    My house sits on top of a hill and our driveway is a hill. The only thing I like about it, is the house looks more stately from the street, LOL. The same house, different colors, is four doors down closer to street-level and ours appears bigger from the street although it isn't of course.

    I hate the driveway, though.

    For one, there's no checking any automotive fluids on it. Secondly, in 2008, six weeks after I bought my new Cobalt, I was trying to listen for an exhaust rattle in my '63 Lark Daytona Skytop, in drive, with the parking brake on--which I'd done a handful of times before--and I watched it roll down the driveway into the side of my Cobalt. A few thousand damage to the Cobalt (both doors on the left side), but really only damaged the right front corner of the bumper on the Lark and bright metal headlight surround, and a smallish crease on the body-colored grille and headlight surround. The body shop took care of that, and the bumper corner and bright headlight surround I bought NOS very cheaply and had the shop install. They actually did better work on the Stude than my Cobalt.
    I took it back for their guessing where to put the little square "GM" emblem. It was half an inch off from the other side. I hate when people think "Ah, no one will notice", and I noticed it instantly after my wife had brought it home.

    My girls were 11 and 14, and their cousin, 13, were out front at the time of the mishap, as was my wife. I began to swear and my wife said to the kids, "Everybody in the house!".
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,628
    Could that one be a two door wagon? Kind of looked like that to me. I've always liked the 56 Nomad more than the 55 and 57, the kind of flat front works with the styling of the car.

    Regarding drainage, on that house and many others like it in the area, the house sits lower than the street, and also on a hillside. Something I'd worry about would be landslides after heavy rain events, or the weird hypothetical, an earthquake after a heavy rain event, with massive landslides everywhere.

    Bellevue boomed in the 50s and 60s, there are entire neighborhoods of mid century houses, many still intact, but some being lost to time and updates. There's also little in the way of a preservation movement, so architecturally significant houses are still being razed or gutted - the survivor houses are labors of love for their owners. I like the mid century stuff too, but really, I like preserved houses from many eras. I am now in a part of town with a ton of development from 1900-1940 or so, there fairly intact streets of craftsman bungalows, brick tudors, all of the interwar revival styles, etc all over the place. I'm amazed to see many original windows in a place with this climate, too. Some specific areas are a bit ritzy, and I imagine maintaining some of these big old houses is a neverending job,



    The '55 Chev wagons are rare in this area, at least if there are any, they are not showing up at cruise ins and car shows. The '56 models show up some, especially the Nomad models.



  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited November 2020
    I can't squint enough to see if there's a door handle in the back door-area or not. I know it's a model Two-Ten, and they were available in two-door 'Handyman' or four-door 'Townsman' wagon body styles. Rooflines look about the same to me in pics.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537
    The front door looks a bit long to me so it might be a 2-door wagon.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 24,367
    I'm thinking that '55 Chevy wagon is a 2-door, as well, although it's hard to tell. I tried looking at pics of the 2- and 4-door wagon, side by side, and even though the front door on the 2-door is definitely longer, it doesn't look that much longer. Plus, on the 2-door wagon, the middle window (which would be the rear door window of a 4-door) is made longer, so it's about the same size as the front window, which gives the illusion of being a 4-door at a quick glance.

    The C-pillar on the 2-door wagon is also really thin, looking like it doesn't really serve much structural support, but rather just something to separate the middle and rear windows.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited December 2020
    That piece of trim on the rear door or rear quarter area always looked funny to me on the wagons--the two-doors and four-doors have a dip in the side glass there where the molding meets up. Doesn't happen on the wagons.

    This contradicts my love of underdogs, but I still like '55 Chevys, and '56's too, quite a bit.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited December 2020
    Speaking of houses, my daughter from CA forwarded me this pic of a house in my hometown from a website called "Cheap Old Houses". $64,900.00. I know the street, but can't say I remember the house. It apparently sold in August and the exterior is in the midst of renovations now, per someone I know who still lives back there. Nice interior and nice furnishings in the pic, but then I like antique stuff. The town was old-money, but not very much anymore. I'd still like to retire there but as we've discussed here, with similar stories from other posters, the wife won't do it.

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 11,650
    $1627 a year taxes. I can’t even begin to imagine that.

    Lot of house for little money, but looking at the pics on Realtor.com I can’t help but think of Tom Hanks in The Money Pit. I could see that place crumbling before my eyes at anything you touch.

    2020 Volvo XC90 T6 Momentum / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • sdasda Indian Land, SCPosts: 3,943
    Wow, the detail work on that house, love it. Gorgeous stairway. I wonder what kind of repairs it needs. That slate roof could cost $$.

    2018 VW Passat SE w/tech, 2016 Audi Q5 Premium Plus w/tech, 2006 Acura TL w/nav

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    It's actually on a nicer street and side of town, and only about a block from the hospital. It's on the 'east side'. Funny, when I was a kid, 'east side' or 'west side' described your family's financial situation; 'east side' better; 'west side', more working-class. We were about central in town, about a block from the unofficial start of 'east side', LOL. My Dad worked at the post office so we were about as middle-middle-class as there was. My Mom was a housewife and didn't even drive.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 40,808
    I am poking around researching places we might want to move to now, with ultimate goal of retiring in place. And no, NJ is not on the list. Actually did consider a few places in PA. Marginally more affordable, and centrally located (for us). A friend had asked about Easton, not a place I ever would have considered, but actually looks like a pretty interesting option.

    Still need to do more digging into COL (mostly taxes on pension and SS) since that makes a huge difference on picking a retirement place. Housing costs and property taxes, that is easy to figure out.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537
    edited December 2020
    The house sold for $59K. Zillow gives this description from the listing: "Twp story home with two garages currently housing owner and hair salon business. This could be easily converted back to single family home. Hair salon fixtures do not convey. Beautiful woodwork and hardwood floors throughout. Uniques, 11 layer, walnut front door leads into large living room with 9 foot ceilings and amazing walnut stairway. Kitchen with beamed ceiling ready for you to add your own touch with modern or classic cabinets of your own. There is plenty of room. Heat pumps supplies heating and air conditioning first floor. Second floor is heated with electric baseboard heaters. Two garages in back, one two car and on single car."

    It was built in 1890 according to the Zillow entry but the pictures show a very odd structure. The front that you see from the street is very shallow, with a small vintage-looking 2-storey addition behind it and another later 1-storey addition behind that. The photos show the beauty salon part with drop ceilings and everything else that would need removal. No photos of the kitchen I could find. The foundation appears to be stone and of course looks damp. There is an apparently decommissioned oil or gas-fired hot air furnace down there. The heat pump or AC unit outside is dated 2006. Electrical looks newer. Bring your checkbook.

    Looking at real estate in Greenville, it would be hard to make a business case for doing extensive renos on any house there since property values seem ridiculously low. Of course if you're buying for yourself to live there long-term that doesn't matter as much. You'd probably have to treat such things as expenses more than an investment, though I can't believe those values will stay that low forever.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 40,808
    oh, there are many sections of this country where you should not expect house prices to ever be going up much, even if they don't keep declining.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited December 2020
    I've really liked this house back home, my whole life. When I was a teenager, a friend was house-sitting it and took me in it. It just seemed first-class to me, and had two stairways upstairs, which I'd never seen before. The decor seems a bit dated (welcome to Greenville, LOL) and I hate how someone added a turnaround in the front yard, and at Zestimate of $214K not a steal, but I still like it. The address puts this house nearly across the street from the earlier house.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/391-S-Main-St-Greenville-PA-16125/78715347_zpid/?mmlb=g,1

    My Dad worked at the post office, which was built in the early thirties. The USPS was going to build a new one but people got the existing one on the Historic Registry I think, and the USPS acquiesced. A guy on NPR a decade ago or so was a post-office hobbyist (I told my wife, "And you think collecting Studebaker stuff is weird!") and called this post office "the most beautiful of any of the 1,300 in the U.S. I've visited".

    It is grand, for a town of probably about 5,500 people--although it serves the surrounding rural townships too.

    https://blog.evankalish.com/2010/10/beautiful-post-office-greenville-pa.html
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537

    I've really liked this house back home, my whole life. When I was a teenager, a friend was house-sitting it and took me in it. It just seemed first-class to me, and had two stairways upstairs, which I'd never seen before. The decor seems a bit dated (welcome to Greenville, LOL) and I hate how someone added a turnaround in the front yard, and at Zestimate of $214K not a steal, but I still like it. The address puts this house nearly due-opposite from the earlier house.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/391-S-Main-St-Greenville-PA-16125/78715347_zpid/?mmlb=g,1

    The decor is awful - that wallpaper, the pedestal sinks, and some of the wood on the walls needs to go - but even with taking car of those things, you'd never get the place across the street to that level at an equivalent price. That is a lot of house at #391.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    edited December 2020
    I've mentioned a million times that Bill Mitchell grew up there. Always had me scratching my head, but at the same time, in the seventies, John Dean of Watergate fame--his parents, and David Soul's parents and sister lived in town. Soul's father (real name 'Solberg') taught at the small college, Thiel, there, but I don't know how Dean's parents ended up there.

    Although we're supposed to get pounded with snow today and tomorrow, my plan is to go there Friday and put a wreath on my parents' graves and maybe swing into the little hardware store downtown and buy a case of furnace filters--I absolutely can't find the size here, and I like that little shop. Of course, I'm supposed to quarantine upon return, sigh. Yeah right. I don't think I'll pick anything up from anybody up at Shenango Valley Cemetery, LOL.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,628
    Whoa, that light oak 'n brass bathroom, welcome to 1982. I like the paneled bedroom. When I was a kid, a friend lived in a 20s era gambrel roof Dutch colonial house backing to a golf course, fairly ritzy place for a small town. It had a 50s-60s era family room addition, and the entire thing had similar paneling (pine?) including the ceilings. For some reason, I thought that was really cool, and I liked to hang out in that room. I also remember hiding out and shooting bottle rockets near golfers, never got caught, but that's a story for another day B)

    And the price, even at Spokane levels, it is insanely cheap. Of course, this metro area is over 500K people, so not apples to apples.

    The small town my mom lives in most of the year, has a 30s era post office - maybe a little later, it is that kind of neoclassic modern style that I'd joke would have looked current in late 30s Berlin. IIRC the city hall is a similar style, must have got some WPA money.

    I've really liked this house back home, my whole life. When I was a teenager, a friend was house-sitting it and took me in it. It just seemed first-class to me, and had two stairways upstairs, which I'd never seen before. The decor seems a bit dated (welcome to Greenville, LOL) and I hate how someone added a turnaround in the front yard, and at Zestimate of $214K not a steal, but I still like it. The address puts this house nearly across the street from the earlier house.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/391-S-Main-St-Greenville-PA-16125/78715347_zpid/?mmlb=g,1

    My Dad worked at the post office, which was built in the early thirties. The USPS was going to build a new one but people got the existing one on the Historic Registry I think, and the USPS acquiesced. A guy on NPR a decade ago or so was a post-office hobbyist (I told my wife, "And you think collecting Studebaker stuff is weird!") and called this post office "the most beautiful of any of the 1,300 in the U.S. I've visited".

    It is grand, for a town of probably about 5,500 people--although it serves the surrounding rural townships too.

    https://blog.evankalish.com/2010/10/beautiful-post-office-greenville-pa.html

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 24,367
    stickguy said:

    oh, there are many sections of this country where you should not expect house prices to ever be going up much, even if they don't keep declining.

    Ain't that the truth! Back in 2016, I looked at a house in Davidsonville, MD, that I knew full well I couldn't afford, but figured that one day in the future I would, so I wanted to check it out, just to see how I might live one day. Here's the house...

    https://www.redfin.com/MD/Davidsonville/2907-S-Lake-Dr-21035/home/10071344

    The listing doesn't show it, but I remember looking it up a few years ago, I think on Maryland's property tax database, and it showed that it had originally sold for around $399K when it was brand new, in 1989. Well, just to keep up with inflation, it would have to sell for around $838K today. I remember when I looked at it, around April 2016, they were asking something like $795K. It finally sold, in May of 2017, for $680K.

    It was a nice house, but up on top of a pretty steep hill, and it had a driveway shared with two other houses. In icy weather, I could almost see having to park down on the street and walk up to it, which isn't exactly safe, either. It had a large 2-car garage, but because of the slope, and all the trees and such, I think building any extra garage space would have been very expensive.

    I think a lot of "luxury real estate" here in Maryland (at least this part of it) tends to fall victim of price drops as it ages. There's always going to be a big demand for starter homes, which helps fuel their prices. But with luxury homes, it seems like every time a new neighborhood gets built, it overshadows the old one. And a lot of those big, older houses sort of become albatrosses.

    I also remember looking at a few that had sold for $700K and more, back around 2005 or so, but were advertised for less than that once I looked at them, and ended up selling in the low $500K range. Heck, even the house I posted above sold for around $850K back in 2005, when people thought the prosperity would go on forever.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,493
    edited December 2020

    It's actually on a nicer street and side of town, and only about a block from the hospital. It's on the 'east side'. Funny, when I was a kid, 'east side' or 'west side' described your family's financial situation; 'east side' better; 'west side', more working-class. We were about central in town, about a block from the unofficial start of 'east side', LOL. My Dad worked at the post office so we were about as middle-middle-class as there was. My Mom was a housewife and didn't even drive.

    Neat stuff. It's amazing how many houses in that area are so cheap. Moderately run down, but not ready for the dozer just yet. Greenville is certainly on the "right side" of the state for retirement. My wife and I will likely settle in the general vicinity when our turn comes.

    The difference for us is that she's the one who wants to be there! But me? I'm pretty easy going, so if she feels strongly about it and I don't, then it's a 'yes.'
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,493

    I've really liked this house back home, my whole life. When I was a teenager, a friend was house-sitting it and took me in it. It just seemed first-class to me, and had two stairways upstairs, which I'd never seen before. The decor seems a bit dated (welcome to Greenville, LOL) and I hate how someone added a turnaround in the front yard, and at Zestimate of $214K not a steal, but I still like it. The address puts this house nearly across the street from the earlier house.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/391-S-Main-St-Greenville-PA-16125/78715347_zpid/?mmlb=g,1

    My Dad worked at the post office, which was built in the early thirties. The USPS was going to build a new one but people got the existing one on the Historic Registry I think, and the USPS acquiesced. A guy on NPR a decade ago or so was a post-office hobbyist (I told my wife, "And you think collecting Studebaker stuff is weird!") and called this post office "the most beautiful of any of the 1,300 in the U.S. I've visited".

    It is grand, for a town of probably about 5,500 people--although it serves the surrounding rural townships too.

    https://blog.evankalish.com/2010/10/beautiful-post-office-greenville-pa.html

    That is a beautiful PO! I really liked the one in Pendleton, OR, when I was a kid. I have no idea if they have done any renovations to it since then, but it seemed quite grand to me at the time.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    It looks like a big city post office, in a Mayberry-size town. Although, when built the population was greater than it is now.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    There are fairly-large, beautiful old churches still there too. Where I live now (suburbia, about 30K population), apparently older churches and the post office got torn down and one-story sixties and seventies-style buildings got erected to replace them.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,628
    I've always been amused by modern postwar era churches, to me they seem to say "we're hip, we're with it, we've changed!" - but I think that might be one venue where many prefer traditional architecture. Still, some cool looking buildings.

    I think most surviving post offices in WA now are either from the New Deal era or the postwar boom. So you either get a seemingly oversized imposing neoclassic kind of thing, or a low modern single story building (always brick). Seems odd, the nearest post office (90s era building) where I used to live was on leased land - landowner didn't renew the lease, so it was knocked down and replaced by a hotel. Seemed wasteful. To relate to cars, that one was next door to a high end used car lot who had a MB CL63 AMG that they overpriced and was in inventory for literally a couple years - I think the owner was using it as his driver. The post office then relocated to a site I think was a Nissan dealership back in the day.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,493

    There are fairly-large, beautiful old churches still there too. Where I live now (suburbia, about 30K population), apparently older churches and the post office got torn down and one-story sixties and seventies-style buildings got erected to replace them.

    The Methodist church in Meadeville, PA, is just incredible. I think it's original construction was 1803.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    Are you or your wife from around there? Meadville is probably 25 or so miles north and east of Greenville, and has probably two or two-and-a-half times the population. I always remember it was the first stop on the Erie Lackawanna passenger train we used to get on in Greenville in the '60's and take to NYC to visit my mother's family.

    I promise this is the last pic I'll post from my hometown (no need to say 'Thanks!', LOL), and to get back on-topic, but here's the Presbyterian Church there...it's so wide across the front I don't think the whole thing can make one picture. I did not go here, but a longtime friend and classmate is currently the organist and Musical Director there, after living in FL for 35 or so years and retiring back with his wife (also from town).


  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,628
    That church above has a real 20s-30s look to it, another one I could see in western/central Europe at the time.

    Thinking of modern churches, I always liked the Mormon Temple in Bellevue - I could see this with a bunch of early/mid 60s cars in the driveway:

    image
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    edited December 2020
    This is the Presbyterian church I went to, when I was a kid.

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    Wow kyfdx, beautiful.
  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoPosts: 174,893
    The chruch I attended in my hometown in California:


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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,493

    Are you or your wife from around there? Meadville is probably 25 or so miles north and east of Greenville, and has probably two or two-and-a-half times the population. I always remember it was the first stop on the Erie Lackawanna passenger train we used to get on in Greenville in the '60's and take to NYC to visit my mother's family.

    Yes, my wife is from the area. Her father worked at a tool and die company in Meadville. I don't recall which one.. maybe Mac Tool & Die? I still preferentially buy Channellock tools when I need something they offer, even though they are typically 2x the price of other similar brands. :D

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 15,389
    edited December 2020
    A family member whom I never met designed churches.
    Here is one walking distance from where I grew up.
    Not totally dissimilar to the picture posted by Kyfdx.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT, 2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 13,030
    Talon Zipper was also in Meadville, but they are probably best known for Channellock.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    kyfdx said:

    This is the Presbyterian church I went to, when I was a kid.

    FYI: Lexington KY

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    edited December 2020
    Next church: High School through young adult




    Same church, two views. Not as pretty as the first one.. lol

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    And, current church



    Definitely not as pretty

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  • texasestexases Posts: 9,433
    edited December 2020
    Here's the Presbyterian church I went to as a child in the suburbs of Cincinnati, earlier photo, but looks about the same today:

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 14,537
    ^^^ I thought that was an office park/shopping mall.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    ab348 said:

    ^^^ I thought that was an office park/shopping mall.

    It actually used to be an HQ. which was a Home Depot clone (before Home Depot).

    It’s been added on to and expanded in the last 20+ years, though.

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 179,901
    @texases I’ve been there! Multiple times.

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  • stickguystickguy Posts: 40,808
    There was a Baptist church here that had a little storefront, then bought and moved into an old Volkswagen dealer. I always thought that was amusing whenever I drive by.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

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