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imidazol97

About

Username
imidazol97
Location
Crossroads of America I70 & I75
Joined
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Member
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734
Posts
20,868
Location
Crossroads of America I70 & I75
More about me
Test 1
Vehicle(s) I currently own
2014 Malibu 2LT. 2008 Cobalt 2LT. (2015 Cruze 2LT)
Badges
34
  • Re: Edmunds Members - Cars & Conversations

    This forum has really gone down the toilet. LOL
    It used to be the most important seat was the driver seat in an automobile, but now.... oh well.
  • Re: Edmunds Members - Cars & Conversations

    I swear Mike, some witch put a curse on you for sure. Can't you burn some chicken bones or something and get the hex off?
    With Mike's luck, if he tries burning chicken bones he'll end up with his clothes and condo on fire.

  • Re: Edmunds Members - Cars & Conversations

    I've been crunching my tax numbers the last 10 days or so. I always gather everything and organize the data, then wait until April 1. This year we can file separately instead of jointly.

    I realize I'm likely the only person on here finishing up and planning to mail, return receipt, on Friday instead of waiting until Tuesday... LOL

    To quote Mark Twain:

    The only difference between a
    tax man and a taxidermist is that
    the taxidermist leaves the skin.
    -- Mark Twain
  • Re: Edmunds Members - Cars & Conversations

    I asked a knowledgeable mechanic why a seal might fail early in life and was given these reasons:

    1) Seal could twist during assembly.

    Other reasons you might have a leak:

    2) a bolt not torqued properly.
    3) threads not cut deep enough to hold torque.
    4) a road hazard that hits a part causing a hairline crack.
    Comments about the seal failure that the service advisor gave you:

    1) If the seal was an o-ring, this is the result of a poor installation. O-rings MUST be lubricated before installing to prevent "twist". Not when you feel like it but ALWAYS. This is an Audi factory installation problem.

    2) Another Audi factory installation problem.

    3) An Audi design problem.

    4) Possible but not likely. Typical service advisor BS.

    So, 3 out of the 4 are on Audi and the 4th is a service advisor that doesn't know when to shut up and wants to impress the customer.

    Service advisors should not try to sound like they have all the answers. If I had gotten those answers, at least the first 3, I'd begin to wonder why I bought an Audi.

    If this were a GM dealership almost everyone would be saying, "yeah, what would you expect" !

    jmonroe
    Oh, the list above wasn't from the service adviser at Audi. If it was I would have stated as such. This list was from simply a question I posed about rear differential leaks, and what might be the cause. He gave the list without even seeing the car.

    The only thing the service adviser did was incorrectly minimize my report of a leak by saying it was probably just melted rust inhibitors and lubricant when I dropped off the car. Most of the time he might be right.

    If this was Chrysler, perhaps the advisor would say sounds like you need a new transmission (and he'd probably be right!) :smile: :open_mouth:

    Sounds like you've gotten a bad Audi. Trade it for another car before it strands you on the road. LOL
  • Re: Edmunds Members - Cars & Conversations

    as to tires, not sure when that became the norm, but the logic is if the traction is going to be different, you want more in the back. better to have the front end slide out (understeer) than to have the back end slide out (oversteer). At least for the average driver!
    I think someone should look this up....just to make sure.

    Not me, it is past my bed time. I will look for the answer in the morning.
    Several sets of tires back the local Bridgestone/Firestone store where I buy my Michelins insisted on putting the two new ones on the back. I insisted on the front. I switched stores for service on the tires. Later at another store in the group, the manager had a letter posted from the company about a lawsuit over someone's having an accident because the rear tires had less tread and the fronts had new good tread which, they claimed, caused the front to grip and the rears to slide sideways on a curve. The car went out of control. And the driver sued.

    Nothing about the driver possibly outdriving the tires and grip for the conditions...