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Toyota Camry Tires and Wheels

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    alan_salan_s Member Posts: 362
    You can buy genuine Toyota wheels on the internet at quite a savings. See http://www.anythingtoyota.com
    I have dealt with this company and they have been very good.
    Be aware that the larger the wheel, the less tire you have and the ride will be firmer. I agree that 16" wheels are the largest you should get.
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    derridaderrida Member Posts: 2
    Guys, thanks so much for the input and links about the spoiler and wheels. I do think the spoiler makes a nice break in the rear lines without looking overdone; those photos are beautiful. But, aren't those SE V6 Camrys? I thought that package was outfitted with 17" wheels, but I'm not certain.

    I'm still curious to know if anyone has seen an LE with just the 15" wheels and a spoiler. I can't picture whether or not the spoiler would work w/o incorporating a larger wheel. Any thoughts on that configuration (LE w/15" wheels and spoiler)?
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    guillguill Member Posts: 94
    SE V6 Camry's had the same 16" wheels as the 4 cyl until 2005. That's when Toyota upgraded the SE V6 to 17" wheels. Sorry, no pics of LE's w/15" wheels and spoiler.

    Here's a few more pics of SE Camrys with spoilers for your viewing enjoyment.

    image

    image

    image

    I think a sedan looks good with a spoiler and other appropriate "sport sedan" modifications made to the car. In this case, the combination of the alloy wheels, headlamps with blackout sport trim, integrated fog lamps, blackout sport grille with chrome trim, black Pearl sport badging with chrome logos, and chrome-tipped exhaust all are effective subtle touches that create a very aetheticly pleasing sport sedan image.

    And no, my Camry isn't this color ... couldn't find any good pictures of a Phantom Grey Pearl camry.
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    lmacmillmacmil Member Posts: 1,758
    Here's my SE-V6. Can't see the spoiler much in this shot but those are the 17" wheels.

    image
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    cyorkecyorke Member Posts: 3
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/807755

    Try this site. It is onw of he few on Cardomain that have not been modified. It is an 05 LE with the 15in hubcaps and factory spoiler.
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    asi12asi12 Member Posts: 46
    Q. Do you really need to do tires rotation and balance every 5000 miles?

    Q2. If yes then would rotatoin only be fine? What exactly balance adds to that?

    My toyota dealer charges $15 for tires rotation and $55 for rotation and balance. Other non toyota dealers (like good year) charges me $25 for rotation and balance.

    I had 01 camry and I always did tires rotation and balance every 5000 miles. I had to change tires at 45000 miles after 4 years. Now I am thinking, lets say if I have been going to cheap shop like good year for tires rotation then I would have paid 9* 25 = $225 over that time period. Lets say now if I did not do tires rotation then probably my front tires would have lasted 35000 miles instead of 45000 miles but for $225 which I would have saved I could have added new tires.

    By the on that car I added regatta 2 tires and cost was 400 for all 4 tires and it included every thing, installation, disposal of old tires, mounting, taxes.

    Now I bought a 05 cmary and it is approaching 5000 miles mark. I would like to hear other people's opinion on that.
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    Rotate only; in my experience, tires don't get out of balance much, if at all, as they wear. You'll know they're out of balance if you get vibration, usually in the 50-60 mph speed range, or uneven tread wear. Vibration in steering wheel = front tires are likely the problem; vibration through the seat = rear tires more likely.

    Also, rotate at 7500 mile intervals, and if you have a full-size spare, use it in the rotation so your original tires last longer.
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    haefrhaefr Member Posts: 600
    "My toyota dealer charges $15 for tires rotation and $55 for rotation and balance. Other non toyota dealers (like good year) charges me $25 for rotation and balance."

    Obviously car dealerships (any make) are profiting on consumer gullibility. The tire shop price is profitable or the manager wouldn't allow the service to be performed at that price. Another source to check is WalMart. Their minimum wage flunkies are just as competent as the tire shops' minimum wage flunkies.

    The good news is that computer balancing takes all of five minutes to learn - even for a minimum wage flunkie. Dismounting and remounting a tire should be self-evident to anyone who can surmise what a lug nut does, and what a wrench does. Just make sure the flunkie doesn't go at tightening the lug nuts with an impact wrench set to 120 lbs. torque. Most import cars use a range of 65 lbs to 80 lbs. Over torqueing can result in a warped brake rotor. WalMart, among others, uses air impact wrenches, but they also use "torque sticks" - torque calibrated extension bars between the wrench drive and the socket that are designed to stop applying rotational pressure once the rated torque is obtained. Some shops use a torque wrench for the same purpose. Whoever does your tire rotation should use one or the other - ASK beforehand how they intend to assure the proper torque for your vehicle. If the answer doesn't include the words "torque wrench" or "torque stick", go elsewhere - that shop manager or employee is not your friend.
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    lmacmillmacmil Member Posts: 1,758
    This is almost too embarassing to post but I need some help so I will :)

    Got a screw in my tire yesterday so I put on the full size spare and got the flat repaired today. Guess what? I can't get the spare (the repaired tire) back in the trunk well. More specifically, I can't seem to get the threaded boss on the bottom of the well to line up with any of the lug nut holes. Not only that but the threaded rod that secures the tire to the threaded boss doesn't seem to be long enough, even if I could get the thing lined up.

    I'm sure the outside of the wheel was facing up but I tried it the other way and this didn't work either. Can someone with alloy wheels and a full size spare on the 2002-05 model look in their trunk and tell me what wheel opening the rod goes thru and verify that the outside of the wheel is facing up? Thanks.
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    Well, I have steel wheels on both of my Camrys, so I'm not sure if this will be applicable.

    However, the threaded boss lines up with the center of the wheel, not one of the lug nut holes. So the rod goes through the center of the wheel, which is recessed compared to the lug nut holes, so the rod should then be long enough. For the steel wheels at least, the outside of the wheel faces up (so the valve stem is readily accessible).
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    lmacmillmacmil Member Posts: 1,758
    Thanks. My center hole is covered by a pressed-in Toyota emblem. I've decided the inside of the wheel must be facing up. When the outside is up, the rod won't reach and the fiberboard cover doesn't sit flat.
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    lpw1881lpw1881 Member Posts: 2
    its not the tps its (IAC) idle air control its located on the throttle body. what happends is the valve gets dirty and doesnt move freely sometimes by removing it and cleaning it will corrected if not replace it
    (always make sure you replace any dirty air filter) to prevent it from happening again as well as keeping your throttle body clean.
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    tomdtomd Member Posts: 87
    I was wondering if it is possible to have tires mounted/unmounted without damaging the alloy wheels. Over the years I have had the tires on my car changed by dealers and also several different tire places. Every time, there are new scratches and chips in various places on the wheels. These are the older wheels that still have the wheel weights on the outside so I realize that there will be marks where the weights were but I am talking about chips and scratches all over. What gives? It is the mounting equipment or just careless handling? Any recommendations as to how I can prevent this in the future when I get a new car?
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    Having used a tire changing machine, it's hard not to make some scratches on the extreme edges of the rims. However, there is no excuse for scratches or nicks elsewhere.

    But I think there are newer machines available that don't make scratches.

    And with the new stick-on wheel balance weights, you don't have to mar the outer (visible) side of your rims ever again.
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    frodo6frodo6 Member Posts: 16
    I have an 07 LE with the steel wheels. Do dealers typically sell the 16" factory alloy wheels (the ones that come as a factory installed option) through the parts/service dept? If so how much would they cost, for parts and labor.

    Or do I have to get another aftermarket alloy? :-(
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    jbishop1557jbishop1557 Member Posts: 6
    My dealer gave me a set of rims that were better then the factory. They where 16" rims but Toyota brand. They usually sell for around $795 per set from the dealer. But you might find them off Ebay cheaper.
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    frodo6frodo6 Member Posts: 16
    Lots of questions but... Where they the TRD rims, with the many spokes? Was the $795 the price installed and did they remount your tire pressure sensors? And did you get them installed after you bought the car, or when you took delivery - I was wondering if I would be able to keep my stock tires instead of buying a whole new set. Thanks!
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    jbishop1557jbishop1557 Member Posts: 6
    I got the rims after I took delivery. They used my tires and mounted them on the new rims. I didn't pay for mine because that was part of my deal, but that is the price I was quoted. Sorry, I didn't get back to you soon. Good Luck
    Jim B.
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    cimetierecimetiere Member Posts: 1
    Hi! I own a Camry 2007 which has a 16" michelin tires on it. Since I had
    previously a Camry 2002 with brand new winter tires on it, however, 15"
    only, I was told that it is possible to buy 15" rims and put my 15" tires on
    it. Would this fit my 2007 Camry? Is it something you would not recommend
    me or is this ok? Any advise?

    Many thanks!!

    --
    --
    Daniel
    http://perso.dromadaire.com/cimetiere/spirituel.html
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    handiangihandiangi Member Posts: 3
    I bought a used 1999 Solara with P225/50R16 tires.

    The label on the door only provides recommended tire inflation for P205 tires.(29psi)

    To what pressure should the P225s be inflated? :confuse:
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    jburgejburge Member Posts: 1
    Hello everyone!

    I'm looking to replace the factory steel wheels (15") on my 2004 Camry LE.

    I checked with a local Toyota dealer yesterday, and for the 5-spoke 15" alloys, they quoted $417.00, EACH!!!!! :mad:

    Does anyone have any suggestions on where I might finder at a more realistic price?

    Thanks all!

    -J.
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    lmacmillmacmil Member Posts: 1,758
    www.tirerack.com

    I'll bet you can find something under $150.
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    naybnayb Member Posts: 2
    I have about 44,000 miles on my 2003 Camry SE and need a tire recommendation. The tires are 215/60 R16.

    I have the original Bridgestone Potenza RE92 tires on the car. I have found that the tires handle very well in good weather, but I'm not happy with how they handle in snow or wet conditions. I live in New Jersey and need an all season tire that will handle well in snow and wet.

    I welcome your suggestions. Thanks.
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    dougb10dougb10 Member Posts: 185
    Hello nayb...

    I have an '03 Camry XLE which came with Michelin MXV4 tires.
    Although only half worn, they were getting very slippery in the rain.
    After some research, I installed Bridgestone Potenza G009 tires and I am very pleased with the improved handling in the wet stuff. They should also be an improvement in snow.

    You may wish to check out the reviews on Tirerack.

    Good luck in your search.

    Doug
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    cam2003cam2003 Member Posts: 131
    No, it will not work!

    a) Offset: 45mm for 2007 and 50mm for 2002. The tires may interfere with strut.
    b) Diameter: 3% less for 2002
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    vicevice Member Posts: 9
    Have a 2007 and want to put snow tires on it. Was going to put tires on rims and called Tire Rack. The monitoring system for each wheel is $111. What happens if I go with out, does it cause any problems with other systems? Thanks
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    I don't believe going without will affect anything else. The only problem is the yellow tire pressure warning symbol in the instrument panel will be lit.
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    kyduckyduc Member Posts: 4
    Hi all,

    I was told Camry 02 steel rim 15x6.5, 5x114.3mm bolt pattern would fit a Camry 06 having the same wheel size, P205/65R15.

    However, being keen on spec, I found a web site actually specifies 45mm offset, but my brother in-law, who owns an 03 Camry, insists that it should be 50mm offset.

    I look at the the rim and found the following:
    J 15x6-1/2 JJ DOT 2 02 65SD5

    Does it mean an offset of 50mm, but this marking does not explicit tell me so. Does 65SD5 means 6.5" and 50mm ?

    Any thoughts, knowledge from the forums?

    Many thanks! :)
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    I am reasonably certain that the Camry's 15 x 6.5-inch steel wheel was the same for the entire design cycle: 2002-06 model years. I don't know the offset, but I seriously doubt it changed during this interval.
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    kyduckyduc Member Posts: 4
    Thank you for your feedback!

    Perhaps what I would like to know now, is how to verify the rims I got from another Toyota owner, that they are indeed of Toyota OEM?

    There is no Toyota marking or indication, but then, they may never have such thing, being OEM parts :D ?
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    naybnayb Member Posts: 2
    Thank you, Doug. I followed up your recommendation by checking reviews and people do seem to like the tire a lot. While calling around for prices on the Bridgestone Potenza G009, one of the dealers recommended either the Goodyear ComforTred or Goodyear TripleTred. They are passenger tires rather than high performance tires. They are more expensive, but are supposed to last longer. For my driving, I might not really need the high performance tires, and am thinking that maybe the passenger tires will be even better in the snow and the wet. But I am still pondering (must take action before the first snowfall, though, since my Potenza RE92s are such a mess in the snow).

    Thanks again for the info.

    nayb
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    dougb10dougb10 Member Posts: 185
    Nayb....I agree with you on the Potenza RE92's. I had them as original equipment on our '05 Subaru Outback Limited. They were very poor in rain or snow, and also had a rock-hard ride. We switched those to Bridgestone Turanza LS-H tires more than a year ago and are very happy with how they perform and ride.
    I was going to put those tires on the Camry, but the Bridgestone dealer suggested that I take a look at the G009's...less expensive and a good fit for the Camry.

    Doug
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    kyduckyduc Member Posts: 4
    Hi nayb,

    Did you say any suggestions? I live in Ontario, Canada, thus my suggestion would be biased toward winter tires.

    I would get a set of rims and winter tires, switch to a complete set in the winter season. The cost would be around 1K, at least in CDN dollars, but if you plan to keep your car for another, say 5 years, it would be a good investment, in terms of enjoyment and safety.

    Let's face it, all-season tires can only do so much, and you already spend the extra $$ for the SE version, what's another 1K ? :)

    My 2 cents!
    PS to save cost, look around for "pre-owned" Camry rims of the same size, a few years old steel rims don't age that much!
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    I don't know if there is a Toyota marking anywhere on the wheels. Do you have some stock Toyota wheels, and if so, do the ones you purchased look identical in every detail?
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    kyduckyduc Member Posts: 4
    Thanks 210delray! Eventually, when I talked to my in-law, realized I do have a full-size spare with steel rim, versus my regular alloy wheels that are standard on LE V6 '06, I was able to confirm stock Toyota wheels.

    The stamping is similar with J 15x6-1/2 JJ DOT xxxxxx(remaining would relate to Date Code?). Either way there is no info on offset that I could confidently decifer. All in all, they look identical side by side, my spare and the "pre-owned" rims. I attempt to do some measurement, e.g. the distance from the lug nut plane to the outward rim plane, the "crest" of the doughnut, both measured to have 45mm. Although this is not directly measured from the imaginery center line of the axe to the lug nut plane, indirectly it proves to be identical.

    So much for that, but I can confidently bring them to the tire shop for winter tire installation, without actually trying to fit them first :)
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    That's great, glad to be of assistance!
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    supergoopsupergoop Member Posts: 46
    Here are my winter tires and rims on my 07 XLE V6. They are 215/55/17 Toyo Garit KX performance H rated winter tires (made in Japan) on BSA 17x7 rims with 35 offset (OEM is 45 offset). I am keeping the original 215/60/16 Michelin all-seasons for the summer. When they wear out, and if the BSA rims are still in good condition, I will use the 17" BSA rims with summer tires, and the original Toyota XLE 16" rims with winter tires.

    The 35 offset gives them a wider stance. Also, the Toyo tires have a much wider tread footprint design, lower profile and rim protectors that make the tires look much wider than my original Michelins. You can see in the pictures that wheels are almost flush with the fenders. My OEM Michelin (215/60/16) has a 7" footprint (I measured it). These Toyo Garit KX (215/55/17) has an 8" footprint. That is 25.4 mm wider!

    My winter options were either steel rims with hub caps, or these! Now, I'll have to wait and see how they perform in the snow and on ice.

    Comments (good or bad) welcomed!

    image
    image
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    image
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    bwong06bwong06 Member Posts: 43
    I want to put the 17 inch SE rims of my LE because the steel wheels arent any good. I have the bridgestone tires, if i but the 17s, do i have to also buy new tires, or can i put the stock bridgestones on the 17s?
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    If your steel wheels are the stock 16-in ones for the LE, then you will have to buy new tires as well.

    Also, because the wheels for the '07 model have the tire pressure monitoring transmitters, you'll need these as well.

    Why not just get 16-in. alloys so you can at least use the same tires?
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    bwong06bwong06 Member Posts: 43
    Yes i just figured out i need new tires if i want to plus size my wheels. So instead of 17s i am thinking about going up to the 18 inch toyota TRD wheels that the dealership sells. What size tires would i need? Should i bother putting in the tmps on such low profiled tires?
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    I personally think 18s are "too much" for an LE Camry. If you don't put in the tmps sensors, then the yellow warning light on the dash will be illuminated continually.
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    tanmichealtanmicheal Member Posts: 10
    Im searching for whels 16" for my 07 Camry, Konig reason or enkei J10 or Enkei GF, which would you guys recommend..please help im getting tired of looking in the website.. i need guys opinion... thank you
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    skorkskork Member Posts: 1
    This 2004 Camry has 53,000 miles. A couple of months ago I heard a low growling noise from the wheels or the tires. I was recently told by a mechanic (who listened to it) it was the left rear wheel bearing. Has anyone else reported this problem?
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    ray_h1ray_h1 Member Posts: 1,134
    What the mechanic told you is certainly possible. Rear wheel bearings in newer cars are rarely serviceable. Instead, they're sealed and pre-lubed for "life". (Translation: they're good 'til they're bad - at which point they require replacement.) If the left rear's on its way out, expect the right rear isn't far behind. Another possibility - and considerably cheaper - is that the "growler" tang rivited to one of the left rear wheel's brake pads is now in contact with the rotor. The purpose is to warn the car owner with noise that the need for brake service is imminent. If the rear brake pads on your car are the originals, I'd wanna check that out before I went to the expense of replacing a rear wheel bearing.
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    Good suggestion about the rear brake pads. However, if the Camry LE is a 4-cylinder (the more popular engine), it will only have rear drums, not disks, so there won't be a brake wear indicator. (The reason I know this is because I also have a 2004 Camry LE 4-cylinder.)
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    ray_h1ray_h1 Member Posts: 1,134
    Thanks for the update. But at 50K+ miles, wouldn't it be possible that the shoes on one side had worn down to the rivets and the metal-to-metal scraping was responsible for the noise the original poster is experiencing? One way or another, someone needs to inspect the rear brakes before blindly ordering up new rear wheel bearings I would think.
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    kiawahkiawah Member Posts: 3,666
    Would be hard to imagine, under normal circumstances, that rear drum shoes would be worn out at 50K miles. Rears don't do very much actual braking. Certainly is possible however, that some other defect caused them to wear out prematurely (ie. binding parking brake cable, bound up rear wheel cylinder). However it's also premature to have to replace a rear bearing. I personally would suspect a problem in the brakes, but we're not able to hear any of the sounds. So who knows what they'll find until they start the job.
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    210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    I agree with both of you that, indeed, the rear brakes should be checked first before looking at the wheel bearings.
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    bluesfan2bluesfan2 Member Posts: 1
    One of our fleet vehicles (a V6 model w/64,000 miles) developed a noise in the r/front that, after tire rotation, was deemed to be a hub bearing. (By 3 mechanics) After pressing in a new bearing, it still makes the same noise. The axle has no slack at all. And the noise is more like what you would expect from a tire,(they're new Goodyears) or bearing, like rngrngrngrng. Rises and falls with wheel rpm.
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    thoythoy Member Posts: 2
    My 2002 Toyota Camry XLE came with S-rated tires. They are now worn out and it's time for new ones. S-rated tires are very expensive. Can't I install lower rated tires - such as H-rated??
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