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Towing Questions/Problems

trailrider1trailrider1 Posts: 2
edited April 2014 in Ford
I'm a new horse owner and I'm ready to buy a truck and trailer to trailride. From my research, I think I need F-250, Supercab, 4X4 to pull a 2 horse Gooseneck Aluminum trailer. I want a 1996-1997 model truck to keep the cost down. I found a 1997 (finally!) yesterday but it is one of the smaller trucks (like a light duty). The dealer says it has more towing capacity than the 2001 Heavy Duty F-250?? Any advice? Thanks!

Comments

  • bnosytbnosyt Posts: 23
    My dad has one of the 1997 F-250 Supercab 4X4 trucks. It has the same bodystyle of the 1/2 ton trucks, but the suspension, etc. is a little heavier. Do you know approximately how much the loaded trailer weighs? This may give you a little better idea of what you need. I just looked at the Ford site and depending on what engine combo, etc you want you can have a bigger towing capacity. Look at the Ford site or call on of the dealers and compare that to the sticker on the door of the truck you are buying.
  • Thanks for the info. The loaded trailer should weigh about 7000 lbs. and the towing capacity on the smaller F-250 is 8300 lbs. The Heavy Duty F-250 has tow capacity of 7300 lbs.! The dealer says it has less t.c. because the truck itself weighs more?? Its just hard to imagine that little truck pulling a big gooseneck trailer.
  • markbuckmarkbuck Posts: 1,021
    gooseneck tounge weight. Usually as much as 20 to 25% of total trailer, at times.

    25% of 6,000 lbs is 1500 lbs in the bed. Probably close to max payload on an F250LD....
  • turney1turney1 Posts: 2
    My husband and I are interested in getting a new compact truck, however we wish to tow a small 1700 pound trailer. I'd like to know why most automatics have a higher tow rating vs. the manual transmission. We really like the manual transmission but may wish to pull something larger in the future. Why the large difference?
  • Anyone out there pulling with new GMC HD Series? Any problems? Mine too numerous to list again.
  • tundradudetundradude Posts: 588
    Towing a 1700 lb. trailer would be irrelevant of transmissions. Not all compact trucks post higher towing amounts for automatics.
  • erikheikererikheiker Posts: 230
    Are you sure you need 4X4? Unless you're going up a steep grade in a snowstorm you probably would never engage the 4WD while towing. If you're just towing a trailer, 2WD should be fine in your part of the country. If you feel you need additional traction, consider getting a locking differential. If I lived down in America 2WD is the way I would go. Just my 2¢ worth.

    Erik
  • wight1wight1 Posts: 218
    Manual transmissions are generally rated with a lower towing capacity due to limitations of the clutch assembly. Most folks apparently slip the clutch too much when towing with a manual and tend to burn up clutches pretty quickly, so the vehicle manufacturers take this into account and give the manual trannies a lower tow rating.

    For what its worth, I used to have a 1982 Chevy S-10 with a 5 speed manual transmission that I used to tow my 2200# boat for about 6 years. I never burned up the clutch in that truck and it was still good when I sold the truck with 100,000 miles on it. My 1990 Dodge truck with an automatic tranny burned up after 74,000 miles towing the same boat. Go figure.
This discussion has been closed.