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False alarm of the anti-theft security system.

e65937e65937 Posts: 2
edited March 2014 in Ford
I have 97 Ford Explorer with factory installaed security system which has remote keyless entry function. It often generates false alarm with horning and falshing lights when it armed. sometimes it starts beeping 1 minute after I leave the car. And some times it annoying me and my neighborhoods in the middle of night. Because there' no impact or effort to open the door both inside and outside of the car. It is obivious that the module affected by some signals such as Polis radio, training station radio, etc.

If you have any idea to fix this problem, please post your ideas.

Comments

  • gasguzzgasguzz Posts: 214
    Is this a used car you just got (or yours since new)? It could've had a shock/motion sensor added to it (and adjusted too sensitive).
  • e65937e65937 Posts: 2
    Thanks for the input in regarding very sesitive motion sensor. I bought it from used car maket. I couldn't find any after market electronics for security under hood. The only module that I found is factory installed security electronic module which has 2 cable harnesses and one antenna port near by jack compartment.
    Does the factory installed security system has motion sensor? If yes, How can I adjust the sensitivity or reprogramming the triger point?

    Thanks for you input in advance.
  • gasguzzgasguzz Posts: 214
    Actually, most factory systems have no shock sensing (for liability reasons). It is easy enough though to add a 2-stage sensor to trip the brain or open-door/hood pin. The most logical location to mount such a device would be in the engine compartment - (1) shorter route to power/ground and fuse/relay compartment connections, (2) direct mounting to the frame/body for more sensing accuracy, (3) easy access to the hood pin switch. So, if well installed, the sensor could be an inconspicuous black box camouflaged in the engine bay.
    Or, you can trick the brain... disconnect it, wait for some 10 seconds, and reconnect (essentailly letting it power down). This might reset the system (if it has an oem shock sensor).
    Good luck.
This discussion has been closed.