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Which gasoline is the highest quality?

historybuff98historybuff98 Member Posts: 3
I was a loyal user of Chevron up until a few weeks ago. I purchased a bad tank of gas from them that caused my 2001 Grand Caravan to ping like crazy. Chevron does not even provide a toll free number to call. When I did call, they told me to call later when the Q.C. people were there...Major blow off. Never again Chevron!!
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Comments

  • sdayalanisdayalani Member Posts: 60
    here in canada, exxon operates under the brand name "ESSO", who are known for shelling out the dirtiest gasoline in ontario.
    their sulphur levels average around 700ppm, one of the highest in the western world.
    an environmental organization even called for a boycott of their gasoline.

    i was a loyal ESSO user for almost 2 yrs when i stopped giving them my business for this very reason. i have since switched to shell and can feel the difference - my car runs smoother than before ...'dont know whether i can attribute that to lower sulphur levels, but whatever the reason ...it runs smoother than before
  • zueslewiszueslewis Member Posts: 2,353
    the bad tank of gas is the gas station's fault. My bet is you fueled within an hour or so after the tanker left and the tanks with still swirling with water, leaves, dirt and other miscellaneous junk.
  • rcarbonircarboni Member Posts: 290
    The rumor has always been that the low-priced "no-name" gas stations buy the dregs of the tankers which may be more prone to contaminents, and therefore get and offer a lower price. Don't know if there is any truth to that, but it does make you wonder how they can sell gas cheaper than a large chain.

    I have been using Sunoco 94 for some time in my supercharged vehicles, and I thought it was very interesting that a tankful of Amoco 93, put in while on vacation, created some nasty pinging where the 94 had never pinged in 20K miles. Didn't think 1 octane level could prevent pre-ignition so well, but apparently it does.
  • kinleykinley Member Posts: 854
    The ARCO is olifin rich and detergent poor. The Chevron, with Techrolene, keeps the injectors clean. When I buy Chevron and the station manager is a rag head, the gas can be anything, but with Techrolene and does it ever ping. Cosco sells cheap gas cheap. They buy the lowest price, and quality, daily. Retirees in M/B and Jags line up for Cosco gas in Palm Springs making me wonder why they put cheap gas in expensive cars? I prefer company run Chevron stations.
  • mrdetailermrdetailer Member Posts: 1,118
    We have a mainly local company that caters to trucks called Flying J. The president of the company used to live in my neighborhood. That company gives a consistently good quality, so I use them when I can.

    However, when traveling, I prefer Chevron No computer adjustments needed after a fill up.

    If It's in the winter with our oxygenated fuel requirements nothing runs as smooth as Chevron. Not a lot, but it just seems to have a little more power. So if I can get it for the same price, I'll pick Chevron in the winter.
  • jukeboxcarl2jukeboxcarl2 Member Posts: 35
    I used to like Amoco before BP got a hold of it, now when I fill up at BP they claim they are using Amoco gas. The problem is my exhaust smells like sulfer. If I use Citgo or Shell, no bad smell. I prefer to use gas that does'nt have alcohol or MTBE, the milage and power drops a very noticable amount. Some of the no names are OK, they usually buy from a couple of sources and sometimes you will get premium fuel no matter what grade you choose. If you get to know the owner well he might tell you, but most of the time they will buy fuel from the cheapest offer and sometimes it can be old fuel that did'nt move fast enough. I would like to try Chevron but it is not available in the Akron,Ohio area.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Member Posts: 2,242
    ... seems I often open with that line, but it gives you an idea of locale. On the coast is a refinery called Coastal. I have asked their drivers who they deliver to and have been told that most independents use them. I was told that all the gas comes down the same pipe, but that different additives were put in before transport. For those of you in Texas, this is the gas that the HEB stations sell. It is usually cheaper, and I have had no pinging or weird smells with it. On the other hand, Texaco premium fumes will burn the hair out of your nostrils while fueling. I swear the stuff smells like laquer thinner or acetone.

    Jim
  • swschradswschrad Member Posts: 2,171
    I drive by the williams pipeline and amoco... oops, sorry BP... pipeline terminals twice a day on the work circuit. on the south end of the Twin Cities Metro, there are Koch and Marathon refineries that mostly serve those areas. everybody's tankers hit these stops... there are tanks for each grade of product... but not for each brand... in these fuel reserves. the most basic difference is the additive mix. next is whether the individual gas station has clean filters and doesn't have leaky tanks or tanks with the fill ports situated low enough in the concrete to allow water into the tanks. somewhere at each station are high vent pipes to keep the tanks filled with something... if not fuel, then air. if you are in a continually dusty location, guess what else gets into the tanks besides fuel and air? these are all major factors.

    if you have some slick fuel broker in your area that takes old fuel, pumpouts from failed stations, salvage from roadside accidents and leaks, and doesn't have a refinery to run that slop through, follow their trucks and don't buy from those stations.

    I've gotta say all the trucks that refill the stations I go to are getting the raw fuel from the williams or amoco pipeline terminal, and nobody's additives to that mix have caused me trouble in 14 years.
  • dhughes3dhughes3 Member Posts: 56
    Several years ago, during the winter, I noticed a pronounced drop of 5-6 mpg on my Daytona. Performance seemed to be unaffected, so I blamed it on winter conditions. I was using gas from any of several scroungy-looking stations, two of which were supposedly selling national brands. By chance, I filled up with Amoco because they had a new brushless carwash and I needed to get the salt off the car. Lo & behold, my gas mileage went up the 5-6 mpg I had lost. "Fluke", I figured. Well, to shorten the story, I found that I got 30 mpg as regular as clockwork if I used Amoco, Phillips 66, or Texaco, but if I went back to one of the scroungy places it dropped to 24-25 mpg. The fact that some of these stations were selling (supposedly) a major brand, and it was obviously of lower quality, indicates that you can't go by brand only, because a schlock operator may be cheating.
  • csandstecsandste Member Posts: 1,866
    Believe that most gas in a particular area does come from one or two distribution points. Here in the St. Louis area there is (or was, they may have changed hands) a Shell and a Clark refinery. I believe that most gasoline sold in the area came from one of these two points.

    When I was growing up in South Dakota (many years ago) Champlin controlled the only pipeline in the state, and they also refined. So even though there were no Champlin stations in the state, every bit of gas sold there was Champlin.

    I would rather trust a large retailer without refining capacity--like QT (which dominates the St. Louis market) and tightly controls its stations than a small independent gas station even if it had a "name" brand on the sign.
  • paulo3paulo3 Member Posts: 113
    I have never had any problems with any grade of Sunoco gas. Mobile on the other hand has created problems in the last two cars I have owned.
  • epr4evrepr4evr Member Posts: 12
    I've had very good luck rather results using Sunoco fuel in my '62 MGA which required premium fuel, as does my '01 Mitsu. Spyder. Going back 25 yrs or so, it used to be called Sunoco 260 and even a local BP (then Sohio) dealer said he runs a tank of 260 through his car occasionally to "straighten it out". THAT got my attention.

    Tomorrow I'll call the Sunoco distributor and ask him to explain the Sunoco product line and will report what he says.
  • ocelot1ocelot1 Member Posts: 101
    I had a 94 dodge van with a 360 and It was a company truck they would buy gas at arco and texico and that thing would ping like crazy but we changed fueling companys and started using shell with the same grade 87 the the ping went away I have no reason for this but I burned a 32 gal tank about every 3days and the shell was consistant. I've had a couple of toyotas and now a mitsu as personal trucks the toyotas seem to get better milage on texco and the mitsu get better milage on chevron. Seems to me the vehical makes a difference too
  • jukeboxcarl2jukeboxcarl2 Member Posts: 35
    In the Akron,Ohio area Sunoco is now using ethanol, and for that reason I will not use it anymore. Amoco was another good one but now BP owns it.I don't know if it the same anymore. I like to buy gas that is not oxygenated.
  • sdayalanisdayalani Member Posts: 60
    any particular reason why you dont prefer oxygenated gasoline?
    it's supposed to have many benefits.

    for details pls visit the forum
    "is oxygenated gasoline really worth it" for some interesting observations.
  • mrdetailermrdetailer Member Posts: 1,118
    I am certain that there is absolutely no conspiracy to have cars run on certain brands.

    That being said, I had an old Plymouth that just died on Texaco and Citgo gasoline. It would run rough and put out white smoke. Chevron, and a local company worked just fine.

    I'll never forget a trip to Napa valley where I purchased generic gas in Vallejo. The car just shook. Replacing with Chevron as soon as possible reduced the problem.
  • mainsail2mainsail2 Member Posts: 77
    I recently wrote the Hess webmaster regarding the quality of Hess gasolines and additives. The reply stated that all three grades of Hess gasolines use high levels of fuel injector cleaners and will "maintain the present levels of fuel injectors cleanliness indefinitely" according to tests done on fuel products. Since Hess is a smaller independent refinary that sometimes markets its products for slightly less, I'm wondering if anyone out there has any direct experience with the Hess line of gasolines. We have a station near our home that I'm thinking of purchasing premium grade from when our new BMW 325i comes in. I understand that there is more to additive packages than fuel injector cleaners, but I wasn't sure of what other questions to ask about additives. I guess some would improve gas mileage.
  • bluedevilsbluedevils Member Posts: 2,554
    Of the relatively few times I've received word-of-mouth recommendations about which brand of gas is "good," most of the time it's been Marathon. No real scientific basis for these claims, although one guy whose dad owns a repair shop read an article once in a magazine (sorry, no idea which one or when).
  • dhanleydhanley Member Posts: 1,531
    I always use chevron gas when i can. I don't have any real solid evidence or tests to back it up. I have heard techron strongly reccommended, and i like that the engine is getting a constant stream of it. I have also heard that manufacturers use it to pass the new emissions tests. I did pull the spark plugs on my saturn after the interval ( the check engine light came on, and new plugs fixed it ) and the plugs were very very clean. The gaps had gotten too wide, though.

    It would be best if CR did a test. I would like to know if i'm wasting money & time.

    dave
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    There are things called 'refinerys'. The majority of these are in coastal areas, because the US is now inporting about 50-60 percent of the crude oil refined. There are some refinerys in the interior, but even they are served by 'crude pipeline' from the coastal areas. A few refinerys actually have enough domestic crude to run, but not many.

    Out of the refinery there are things called 'pipelines'. These are underground and run all over the US. Pipelines may or may not be owned by an oil company. Most of them run interstate, so there are a lot of Federal ICC regulations controlling them. They basically have to make space available to whoever wants to pump product through it, within limits. They only have so much capability, can make long term contracts, etc. But generally cannot say 'I'm not going to pump your product because you are a big competitor. Fed's don't allow this.

    Then, there are 'terminals', where the product is pulled out of the pipline into storage tanks. This might be owned by the pipeline or oil company.

    Now, how it works. Pipelines do NOT GO FROM EVERY REFINERY TO EVERY TERMINAL.

    Oil companys do 'exchanges'. Long term contracts that say 'I'll give you my product out of that terminal if you give me your product out of that other terminaly way over there'. And they balance these exchanges out each month, gallon for gallon, only paying any difference.

    Or, oil companys buy product directly out of a terminal.

    Continued.....
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    In the old days of leaded gasoline, there was only ONE gasoline out of refinerys and pipelines, 'regular'. You got 'premium' by throwing in more lead and other additives, butane, propane, etc.

    OK, now I haven't been very near the business lately, but I think now there are 2 grades out of the refinery, 'regular' and 'high-test'. (The oxygenation or some other local regulated blend might also require a separate 'grade' out of the refinery, I'm just not sure of this.) Without lead, you can't boost the octane of regular enough to get the high-octane grade, it has to be refined. (P.S. Avaition fuel is just higher octane gasoline. In a refinery "The good stuff comes out first".) Of course, the mid-grade is just a mix of the two, done at the pump dumping into your car.

    Trucks from lots of different oil companys pull up to the loading docks of a terminal. Each oil company specify what additives are put into the truck when it is loaded. There are also companys that own large amounts of service stations, maybe own their own trucks, and they specify their additive mix also. These additives are cleaners, octane enhancers, winterizing additives, oygeninating compounds, and whatever the great government might be regulating for your local market. There are about 85 different blends of gasoline now regulated by governments across the US.

    So, in any one location, there probably isn't more than one or two actual separate sources of gasoline. Any difference is because of the additive 'package' the retailer has put into their gasoline or overall level of gas down the pipeline.

    You can't call a major brand. It varies too much. You don't know who is running the show. That station could be a 'company owned' (by the company with the big sign out front) or a large local 'jobber', owning dozens of stations - maybe owning the terminal, could still have the brand out front but dictitates the package he is putting in his gas. I know, he is supposed to put in a 'package' the brand company specifies, but how can a company control this. They can't control if he keeps the bathrooms clean, much less know what he is having dumped into his station tanks. And the terminal will load whatever package the buyer specifies.....

    There might be company that closly control their product. But don't bet on it.

    Find a station that doesn't cause problems, and stick with it.
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    One more thing.

    Terminals. Even though there might be multiple companys pushing their product past them through the pipeline out back (There is no problem keeping product and company ownership separate in a pipeline. Gasoline, diesel, furnace oil, are all pumped down the same pipeline. It's magic.) they don't want to have a large number of tanks just to keep companys product separate. The tanks are just to expensive to do this, plus this just gets into more complex pipe, valves, and pumps in the terminal. If a company wants its product separate they usually build their own separate terminal off the pipeline. And this is expensive.

    So, there usually isn't a lot of separate tanks at a terminal. This is why the product in any location is very limited.
  • kinleykinley Member Posts: 854
    We tend to buy Chevron because of the Techrolene.It has been noticed that the Chevron gas quality varies from one location to another as does the price. A week ago last Friday, Regular, self serve was 1.349 only 60 miles away from here where at the same time the same brand was priced 1.699 locally. Both within the same state. Could the price at the North Terminal be lower than the price at the South Terminal? The local distributor buys at the South Terminal, but he's been seen trucking in from the North Terminal and charging South Terminal prices to the stations. Around here ARCO does not enjoy the same reputation as Chevron, but their prices are significantly lower. What is your opinion of ARCO? Thank you for your input.
  • acuraowneracuraowner Member Posts: 57
    I dont know if Chevron just has really good marketing or product names but for some reason the "Chevron Supreme with Techron" name just makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. If I cant find a Chevron station I look for Texaco with their "Texaco Premium with Clean System 3". I know its probably just a marketing ploy but that marketing ploy has made me a die hard Chevron and Texaco customer.
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    Ugggggg, what do I think about ARCO?

    As I said several ways in my 3 messages, IT VARIES!!!!!!

    YOU CAN'T MAKE GENERAL STATEMENTS ABOUT GASOLINE QUALITY ACROSS DIFFERENT AREAS!!!!!

    Additives: In 'general', they are the same. At least the additive that does 'something' is about the same in all brands. As a matter of fact, many are probably the exact same chemical across many brands.

    A cleaner/detergent is a cleaner/detergent. An octane booster is an octane booster. A winterizing agent is a winterizing agent. A vapor pressure modifier is a vapor pressure modifier.

    YOU ARE BUYING INTO THE 'MARKETING' IF YOU THINK DIFFERENT!!!!!

    There may be minor difference, but not great ones. Now, how much they specify at the terminal, the combinations, the general octane of a slug of gasoline - these help make up the variances from brand to brand.

    A little history: When fuel injection first started to become rather common on autos, replacing carbs, clogged injectors was a big problem. Some people realized that most gas companys were putting more/better cleaner/detergents into the premium line of gasoline. And this would keep the injector from clogging. People were buying premium when not needed for the octane, only for the cleaning capabilites.

    The gov'mint stepped in. Mercedeis Benz (sp) had been running fuel injection for a while and knew a lot about this problem. They already had specs written about how cleaning additives should perform. The gov'mint set a regulation that all gasoline must conform to the MB spec, even for regular gasoline. And this stopped most of the problems with clogged injectors. Also generally kepts the fuel system, valves, etc cleaner.

    So, you should be getting a decent cleaner additive from any gasoline, unless the seller is a total crook.
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    Several years ago I was in a small town in Mississippe and needed gas. I noticed there seemed to be a big ($.10/gallon) difference in prices between stations. Old cheep me, I rolled into one of the cheep ones, one that wasn't exactly a new, sparkly, shiny one either. You know the kind, where the wife refuses to even go into the bathroom, she knows it isn't going to pass her inspection for plopping her butte down on a toliet seat.

    As I was pumping the gas, I noticed it smelled 'strange'. Then I saw the sign that said it contains 10percent methanol (or ethanol), whichever corn refined alcohol is used in gasoline. On the way out of town, I looked closer at the stations, the ten cents different was between the alcohol and non-alcohol sign bearing stations. Our gov'ment allows a large federal gasoline tax break on alcohol use, and this was the price difference.

    Well, by the edge of town my 1984 Toronado (305ci carb motor) started to tell me it didn't like that alcohol at all. Hesitate, no power, almost couldn't pass a car. When I had about a 1/4 tank of this stuff gone, I filled up at a nice shiny Texaco/Mobil/Chevron with some premium. Also started buying octane booster/gasoline de-icer/cleaner and throwing into the gas tank. I kept refueling, attempting to dilute the stuff down whenever I got a 1/4 tank down.

    'Driveability' continued to be terrible, even back on the interstate trying to maintain a steady speed it just didn't want to do it.

    Problems continued. I think the check engine light even came on. When I reached my destination in Florida, I was looking for an Oldsmobile dealership as I was driving into town. I thought that alcohol had probable eaten through a diaphram on some sensor or loosened crud in the fuel lines and stopped the carb up. Figgered I was into renting a car while this thing laid around an Olds dealer as I sat on the Florida beach.

    But, the next morning, I started the old Toro up, the check engine light stayed off, and it was back the same as before. It 'cured' itself.

    I looked for the methanol signs much more carefully as long as I owned that car....
  • mlm4mlm4 Member Posts: 401
    As someone mentioned in an earlier post, Chevron supplies fuel to the "Big Three" (presumably GM, Ford and Chrysler) for emission durability testing even though Chevron does not distribute in Michigan (the fuel has to be trucked in).

    http://www.chevron.com/prodserv/fuels/techrongas/successbig3.shtml

    Now I'm not sure that this is an endorsement on the quality of Chevron's fuels by the manufacturers or just a convenient and cost-effective arrangement that they have had with Chevron for all these years. But it does lend to the "warm-fuzzy" feeling that some customers have for Chevron (me included), whether or not there is anything to it.

    In any event, here in Central Florida I have a choice of Chevron or Texaco, and I have tried both, and the Texaco 87 octane makes my Tahoe ping, where the Chevron does not. When I lived in Colorado, Conoco made my truck ping, and Texaco did not (but I had to use 89 octane because the "high-altitude" 85 octane caused really bad detonation). And when I lived in New England, I was loyal to Mobil because I never had any fuel problems with it from any station (same cannot be said about Gulf and Shell).

    I believe that for the most part all gasoline is pretty much the same except for some of the proprietary additives and the "cleanliness" of the fuel coming out of the pump at any particular station. So go with what works...
  • csandstecsandste Member Posts: 1,866
    had more to do with the individual gas station than the ethanol mix. Although that may have made problems in an old carburated engine.

    I would much prefer to deal with a large vendor who does not refine (such as QT) than some old mom and pop station no matter what the brand of gas featured.

    In the St. Louis area, at least, QuikTrip controls prices by being the first to jump fifteen or twenty cents and then by letting the price drift downward. Since they control the market they can do this. People like their stations because they're well lit, always have cop cars outside (plenty of corporate support for police, place to do paper work, etc.), are clean and give good service. Few people care if the gas is the same as Clark, since Clark stations are dirty, grimy and run down. For most people it's retailing ambiance, and the knowledge that the product and service will be uniform that gets them in the door.
  • dhanleydhanley Member Posts: 1,531
    Why add gas every 1/4 tank? That's just prolonging the agony. You'd dilute it many times faster by refilling when you were down to 1/4 tank.

    .75 * .75 * .75 = 42% cruddy gas after three 1/2 tank fillups, while if you do it after running down to 1/4 tank you obviously have 25% cruddy gas.

    I've used ethanol fuel in my cars, and i don't think i can really tell the difference. Of course those are fuel injected and both are pretty "techy" motors.

    The chevron link is interesting. I figure using chevron in my car costs me $30 a year over a ma & pa shop, so i'll keep using it for peace of mind.

    dave
  • spokanespokane Member Posts: 514
    We should be aware that ethanol has only 2/3 of the heating value of an equivalent volume of gasoline. Thus, the BTU content of a gallon of 10% ethanol in gasoline is ~3% less than that of a gallon of gasoline. Conventional gasoline, therefore, provides a 3% greater number of miles per gallon than a 10% blend, assuming the engine timing is optimized in each case. Ethanol does burn clean, of course, and 100% ethanol has an octane rating of ~99.

    On another point, the development of cleaning agents to accommodate fuel injection technology was a major oil industry project in the 1980's as others have indicated. It's my impression that the prevention of deposits on the intake valves was the major part of this endeavor and that control of injector nozzle contamination was a lesser problem.

    Bolivar, you left your audience hanging when you mentioned that gasoline, diesel fuel, and others are transported through a common pipeline. You are correct, but would you care to elaborate as to how this is achieved?
  • mmcbride1mmcbride1 Member Posts: 861
    Don't know why, but our cars seem to get 2 mpg or so better if I use Diamond Shamrock than if I use Texaco or Conoco. I love the fact that the UDS station is cheaper than the others consistently. :)
  • mastermechanicmastermechanic Member Posts: 31
    On January 2, 2000 between 12 noon and 12:30 P.M., I attempted to purchase six dollars worth of gasoline at the B.P. station located at the southeast corner of the intersection of Lorain Avenue and Fulton Rd in Cleveland Ohio. This is my regular fueling point as I live near by.


    When I make fuel purchases, I usually purchase ten or twenty dollars worth, but because of the price of fuel now-a-days, I had to cut back on my fuel consumption by making small purchases on a regular basis.


    At the time of the attempted purchase, I though that I would get rid of a bunch of rolled pennies, which had my name and address on them, by using them to make the fuel purchase.


    I went up to the window where the attendant was at and placed ten rolls and a dollar bill on the counter and asked for six dollars on number (whatever pump I happen to be at the time). The attendant refused to accept my currency stating that he couldn't take all that change. When I asked him why, he stated that he had too much change in his drawer. I then said that, "So now you'll have more change." He said, "No!" I picked up my rolls and drove down to the Shell Station on W. 73rd. and Lorain Avenue where I had no problem making a purchase using the rolled coins.


    This incident occurred while the attendant was on the phone. Lately, four things always occur whenever I go to that BP station. The attendant is always on the phone. He/She is in the back doing whatever. Most of the pumps are broken. Finally, there is always someone outside trying to bum money with the story that he works for N.A.S.A. and that he needs to have money to get to work so they can launch the shuttle or something.


    On various occasions, whatever attendant happened to be on duty, I was asked if I wish to donate to some screwball charity. I'm also asked if I want pop or chips.


    I'm there to buy gasoline and with U.S. currency. I shouldn't have to put up with this kind of service. I think that your company needs to take another look at practices and policies at this particular station. I'd prefer to go there because it is close to home, but since my money is good anywhere, I'm not forced to patronize this or any other BP station and put up with this kind of treatment.

    image


    click here for GEORGE'S ELECTRONIC GARAGE SALES

  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    Never worked much around the pipeline business,
    but different kinds of refined products are separated in pipelines by -

    1)Pigs. These are rubber balls put into the pipeline between different products.
    2)Water. Yep, just throw in a slug of water between products.

    When they pull the product, there is some way they know when they hit the water, I don't know how they do it. The water is pumped into a 'sludge' tank. And, of course, this is a mixture of just about everything because you get some of the first product, water, and some of the second product. This is can then be trucked to a re-refiner, or it could be sold to something like a trash burning facility, or something else with a huge furnance that isn't very particular about what kind of fuel you feed it. And it's burned there.

    Now, do you-all understand some more about the variability of motor gasoline sold at your corner station?
  • bolivarbolivar Member Posts: 2,316
    I started diluting it because I wasn't sure the car was going to continue to run at all. Thought getting some better gasoline in there would help.

    I might have picked up water. But I have seen what water will do. Very much of it will totally or almost totally stop a carberator auto engine. I put in enought de-icer additive from Walmart that it should have picked up a small amount of water and pulled it through.

    And, with ethanol, I think it should also combine with water and pull it on through the engine. (The de-icer stuff is 90% some kind of alcohol. Alcohol will 'attach' to water, keep it from separating, and you can burn it out.)

    I don't think it was dirt, this should have stayed with me.

    I pulled a canister type fuel filter from a friends car after he almost didn't get home with it from a trip. We dumped the canister and something almost like jelly or jello came out. We think he got some ethanol and it de-sludged the fuel tank and lines. Then this stuff almost stopped up the fuel filter. The filter did save his injectors from clogging.

    My problem happened in mid or late 1980's, the 1984 Olds Toro was a relatively new car. I sold it in 1991, and it was well before this. And, I just remembered it was a 307ci, not a 305 as I said before.
  • csandstecsandste Member Posts: 1,866
    Better ethanol than MBTE.
  • swschradswschrad Member Posts: 2,171
    I was always under the impression that "pigs" were just a barrel of water between product loads. in the pipeline yard, they have a computer printout of what products are coming in which order. the water slug just allows conduction between two electrodes built into a pipe section, which allows switching valves to redirect the product flow. you would expect by that system that there is water on both ends (end and start) of a product change, and filtration should take care of that.

    of course, that's from reading, not from whacking a valve button in a control house when the buzzer goes off....
  • brorjacebrorjace Member Posts: 588
    There are two common types of de-icer alcohols:

    Methanol

    Isopropyl (Isopropnyol)

    The first one was used first (I think) and is cheaper. It's aslo corrosive to fuel systems and, in my opinion, should be pulled off the market completely.

    The second one (Isopropyl) is much better and safer and is only about $1 for a 12oz bottle.

    Various companies/brands make both kinds so you have to read the labels carefully. I like to go to Walmart and buy 4-packs of Isopropyl gas drier for about $3. I use about 5-6 each year ... mostly in the winter.

    --- Bror Jace
  • mastermechanicmastermechanic Member Posts: 31
    DON'T PATRONIZE BP GAS STATIONS. THEY DISCRIMINATE


    The Cleavelander


    On January 2, 2000 between 12 noon and 12:30 P.M., I attempted to purchase six dollars worth of gasoline at the B.P. station located at the southeast corner of the intersection of Lorain Avenue and Fulton Rd in Cleveland Ohio. This is my regular fueling point as I live near by.


    When I make fuel purchases, I usually purchase ten or twenty dollars worth, but because of the price of fuel now-a-days, I had to cut back on my fuel consumption by making small purchases on a regular basis.


    At the time of the attempted purchase, I though that I would get rid of a bunch of rolled pennies, which had my name and address on them, by using them to make the fuel purchase.


    I went up to the window where the attendant was at and placed ten rolls and a dollar bill on the counter and asked for six dollars on number (whatever pump I happen to be at the time). The attendant refused to accept my currency stating that he couldn't take all that change. When I asked him why, he stated that he had too much change in his drawer. I then said that, "So now you'll have more change." He said, "No!" I picked up my rolls and drove down to the Shell Station on W. 73rd. and Lorain Avenue where I had no problem making a purchase using the rolled coins.


    This incident occurred while the attendant was on the phone. Lately, four things always occur whenever I go to that BP station. The attendant is always on the phone. He/She is in the back doing whatever. Most of the pumps are broken. Finally, there is always someone outside trying to bum money with the story that he works for N.A.S.A. and that he needs to have money to get to work so they can launch the shuttle or something.


    On various occasions, whatever attendant happened to be on duty, I was asked if I wish to donate to some screwball charity. I'm also asked if I want pop or chips.


    I'm there to buy gasoline and with U.S. currency. I shouldn't have to put up with this kind of service. I think that your company needs to take another look at practices and policies at this particular station. I'd prefer to go there because it is close to home, but since my money is good anywhere, I'm not forced to patronize this or any other BP station and put up with this kind of treatment.


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  • emaisonemaison Member Posts: 60
    I won't comment on the rest of the crap you dealt with.

    As far as rolled coins go, I must say on behalf of all people who work or have worked retail: "Thats what banks are for."

    I also dont see how that or any of the other incidents you describe are discriminatory.
  • picturethispicturethis Member Posts: 16
    Actually, according to US law, legal United States currency cannot be refused in any denomination. It does'nt even have to be rolled.
    This law was created so merchants could not undermine legal tender by demanding gold, silver, ect.

    Rat them out to the US Dept. of Treasury and they will start an investigation.
  • dhanleydhanley Member Posts: 1,531
    Sorry, that won't work. Lots of places won't even take cash despite the "legal tender for all debts public & private" crap.

    Go ahead, try to pay your taxes with all pennies & nickels!

    dave
  • vidtechvidtech Member Posts: 212
    In Ohio I believe Marathon is best.No alcohol just 100% gas.It also cleans fuel sytems as well as the others.
  • mastermechanicmastermechanic Member Posts: 31
    "I won't comment on the rest of the crap you dealt with.
    image
    As far as rolled coins go, I must say on behalf of all people who work or have worked retail: "Thats what banks are for."

    I also dont see how that or any of the other incidents you describe are discriminatory. "

    I'm sure if we were from the same background, he wouldn't have racially profiled me. He figured that I might stick him with a rolled up piece of pipe.
  • joe3891joe3891 Member Posts: 759
    Most small stores post a sign no 100 bills accepted,and some even post no 50 bills.So much for federal law.
  • mmcbride1mmcbride1 Member Posts: 861
    I'm sure there's a sign up there that says "We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone".

    And I agree on the whole bank thing. Take your coins to the bank and get paper $.
  • dudleyrdudleyr Member Posts: 3,469
    Where I live there is only one suppplier, so all of the stations get their gas from the same source. They, of course, may put different additives in, but the gas is the same.
  • pigloverpiglover Member Posts: 25
    Is there any advantage to using higher octane in an engine designed for 87 grade fuel? If there is no knocking or pinging with 87 grade is there any reason to occasionally use premium? Or is it just a waste of money. I used to think that it burned cleaner or hotter. One post I saw on a different message board said something about a higher octane fuel having more resistance to burning and leaving more carbon deposits. (Why would anyone pay more for that?)
  • joe3891joe3891 Member Posts: 759
    is for engines with high compression,they put in an additive that lowers the BTU rating so less heat energy,but its needed for high performance engines so they don't destroy them selves.Always use the octane the owners manual recommends.Using higher octane won't hurt anything just your wallet.
  • sdayalanisdayalani Member Posts: 60
    gasoline on cars that recommend 87 octane can yield performance benefits only if the car is equipped with a "knock sensor".

    also, over time as the engines ages and accumulates mileage, octane requirements MAY change. this depends on how well the car has been maintained.
    i have see a lot of people driving older cars that still use 87 octane ...some of them said that they switched to 89 octane, and after using a brand product like chevron techron concentrate of redline si-1 fuel system cleaners, it helped them switch back to 87 octane without any problems.

    something worth thinking about ...
  • sdayalanisdayalani Member Posts: 60
    pardon me for the grammatical errors above ..forgot to check my msg before posting it
This discussion has been closed.