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Three Steps To Trading in Your Used Car

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,112
edited April 2017 in Editorial
imageThree Steps To Trading in Your Used Car

The do's and don'ts of the used car trade-in process in three easy steps.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • lmaddoxlmaddox Posts: 1
    Thank you. I am getting ready to trade in a 97 Infiniti with paint damage, so this is all helpful info.
  • Howdy, this is a ridiculous article. It hardly says anything about what a dealer looking for that would help the consumer? This article does not help the consumer to deal or improve their trade. This article deals with how the dealer handles “their” pricing concerns. The consumer can’t control most of the listed attributes the dealer is referencing. I would prefer to hear what actions the consumer can do to increase the value of their trade. Also, many dealers advertise how they will meet or beat published trade in values (i.e. Bluebook). The dealers set an expectation by their advertising. The banks in like manor support published pricing. All that being said, I believe the consumers should have a robust way to have a reasonable way to achieve the best possible dollar value.
  • This is the WORST article I have ever read on the subject. The first thing should be a warning on how predatory dealerships will be. Their #1 goal is to underpay and lowball you with as little money as possible. Yet instead of giving any kind of a warning, the author suggests just blindly going and getting it appraised at the dealership, 'and show up early' 'and don't overestimate it's value'. I used to have respect for edmunds, now I'm seriously left wondering.
  • CarGuy1950CarGuy1950 MinnesotaPosts: 1
    The best way to get the most $ for your trade-in is to have all scheduled maintenance documented, have the vehicle clean inside and out, include all aftermarket additions with purchase receipts, and have mileage that is much lower than average (most average annual mileage estimates fall between 10,000 & 12,000 miles per year, depending where you live and your driving habits). The vacation roadtrip to all of the US National Parks is a killer to the low mileage factor, get a rental car & pay upfront for the extra miles you put on it. You can also do a little research to see how much demand there is for your vehicle.
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