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2014 Mercedes-Benz CLA250 Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited September 2014 in Mercedes-Benz

image2014 Mercedes-Benz CLA250 Long-Term Road Test

We add 1,200 miles to our Long-Term 2014 Mercedes-Benz CLA250 this month and the average fuel economy inches up.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • greenponygreenpony Chicago, ILPosts: 531
    The thought behind a small turbocharged motor is that you can have good fuel economy if you want it, or good power if you want it. In this case, the operative word is "or". The reason the EPA ratings seem inflated is that the testing procedures rarely if ever dip into boost (read: they're sllloooooooowww), and I'd bet that you guys spin that turbo up constantly. For instance, I have a turbo Optima and a Focus ST (I thank the Edmunds.com reviews for those decisions). Both are capable of hitting 40 mpg if you're light on the throttle and stay below 60 mph. But who buys a 250+ hp car and never uses that power? The reality is that the EPA tests do not reflect the reality of driving on today's roads, and automakers can "trick" the system with ever-smaller engines and big turbo boost.
  • darthbimmerdarthbimmer Posts: 606
    Agree with @greenpony. A engine with undersized displacement but turbo boost presents an either/or choice. You don't get economy and performance at the same time. Still, that is useful-- good economy and a small package for when you drive gently, power in a small package for when you don't.
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