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How to find a quality salesperson

tomm14tomm14 Posts: 15
edited March 2014 in Dodge
I am getting ready to buy a new Dodge truck. How do you find a good referral for a salesman? The last time I was out shopping cars I just seemed to run into the new guy....who if I call a week later....has moved on....Or I seem to get the guy who is doing this kind of a between jobs kind of thing.I will never forget the one salesmen who came out. You could see all his tatoos under his white dress shirt....plus his wife beater tee shirt too....not to mention he was missing about three front teeth.....boy he was a winner.
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Comments

  • suzzannsuzzann Posts: 56
    Many of the survivors are internet, fleet and sales managers.
  • pluto5pluto5 Posts: 618
    There are very few successful car salesmen. Most don't last six months. They are lured by promises of high five figure incomes and not having to break a sweat. Most dealers will hire any suit who has sold mortgages, insurance, pots and pans, etc. Product knowledge is definitely not a requirement on the job. Stores in cities are part of multi-dealer operations and salesmen move from one to the other. They quickly find out that the cards are stacked against them and they are working 60 hr. weeks for low pay.

    Your best bet is to go to a small town dealership and talk with the general manager, or truck specialist if that's what you're looking for. You might luck out and find a good independent dealer in a metro area; I've only found one.
  • you're not buying the sales person...

    do your research on the truck, shop around and try to buy from the dealer where you'll get it serviced.

    stay focused...
  • pluto5pluto5 Posts: 618
    Buying from the dealer where you are going to get service doesn't necessarily give you any leverage, in my experience. You may pay a premium and find a better service department at another dealership so I would go with best price since any authorized dealer for that brand will service it. Who needs dealer service, anyway, except for warranty work. It's usually slower, more expensive and often inferior to independent shops who work to keep your business while the dealers count on their brand to bring you in and hype like "5 star dealer". You can call the dealer service department periodically and give them your VIN to check for recalls without bringing your car in. My opinions based on 30 yrs. experience.
  • I am a ex-car salesman. Go to www.grantcardone.com, www.joeverde.com www.davidlewis.com You tell me what you think these web sites do.

    I remember a manager telling me when I sold cars for a living. He said if you don't squeeze them till they "POP or DROP" somebody else will.

    I say if you, if you like the salesman, you will be in your comfort zone. If you are in your comfort zone you will have your guard DOWN.

    Make shure that you buy a car from a salesman that you do NOT LIKE. This will empower you to be more agressive in your negations process.

    when buying a car, you CAN NOT BE IN A COMFORT ZONE.

    Step 1 get a loan from YOUR BANK first, before going to any cardealer.

    step 2 use edmunds payment calculator to find out how much you can spend.

    step 3 call the dealer that sells what you want, ask to speak to the FLEET MANAGER.

    step 4 Tell him/her that you will give a 100% on the CSI Survey if you buy from them.

    step 5 NEVER negotiate price, You tell him/her that you only negotiate profit.

    step 6 Buy the new car, truck or SUV at invoice ONLY. and then tell the fleet manager that you want the rebate.

    step 7 remember that EVERYTHING they try to sell you, warranty, Insurance, window tint, security system, profit on the car, trade money, is ALL negotiable. and I mean EVERYTHING!

    step 8 you MUST remember that the nice man or nice lady in the Finance office is going to try to sell you EVERYTHING when you go to that department to "SIGN" the papers.

    step 9 Remember that there is no 3 day bring it back policy and get out of the car deal. you buy it drive it off of their lot and IT IS YOURS!

    Signed
    Stick Bogart
    Ex-car salesman.
  • mirthmirth Posts: 1,212
    Cool! I can use these steps when I go to buy my new M3 and Honda Odyssey!
  • abtsellerabtseller Posts: 291
    not suprised.

    Ed
  • gosh, when I read those steps of a sale I just want to grab an UP and rip somebody's head off - ah, the good 'ol days. :-)
  • landru2landru2 Posts: 638
    "Make shure that you buy a car from a salesman that you do NOT LIKE."

    "Tell him/her that you will give a 100% on the CSI Survey if you buy from them."

    Is it just me, or does this advice seem to fly in face of this guy's other post where he expresses his indignation at dealers trying to manipulate the CSI system?
  • afk_xafk_x Posts: 393
    step 5 NEVER negotiate price, You tell him/her that you only negotiate profit.

    step 6 Buy the new car, truck or SUV at invoice ONLY. and then tell the fleet manager that you want the rebate.

    What negotiation is there is you only buy at invoice???
  • suzzannsuzzann Posts: 56
    I bet you'd get tossed out of the dealership in a minute!

    All you're doing is asking for trouble. Never start with an adversarial relationship. All the dealer wants is to sell the car. All you want to do is buy it. You just have to come to terms.

    I've had good luck using Priceline, others have had luck with other services. There's no need to shop from dealer to dealer. Find the car you want and make an offer. If it's rejected, don't waste your time, go online and find that Fleet Manager.
  • rroyce10rroyce10 Posts: 9,359
    ...... Let me see if I have this right ...

    You go over to "News and Views" and drop a bomb -- you scoot over here and try to drop another. You have tried the CSI thing .. So that's 3 .. What's up ..?

    Personally, I don't feel you were anything close to being in sales -- Vehicle or any other sales. You drop 3 sites and say "Hey look" ... What's there too look at ..? 3 Sales motivation companies ..? Some of these were good enough for Century 21 and HP nationwide, they have also knocked my door and called my phone --- Sooooo ...?

    You recommend that they dangle a CSI score in front of them. There's not a Dealership that would ever take you seriously

    You list, make sure that you deal with a Salesperson "you don't like" -- l..o..l... Gheeez, your kidding right ..? That will get someone, nowhere in a "big fat hurry".

    You also recommend that the Fleet Mgr has the "horsepower" too cut mini-deals --- Where..? I would love to know. I'm in a lot of Dealerships .. the Sales Mgr makes the final decision .. and as a rule, they flip the customer to a Salesperson or the Internet Mgr, who is probably one and the same.

    My goodness man .... where do you come up with information ..? l..o..l.....

    I think, you might be under a different post name, like hudrahead or whoever. But, you say you are an EX Saleperson .... hmmm, I don't think so.

    You might listen to Suzzann and the others that DON'T have an axe to grind, because based on your info --- nobody could buy a vehicle ..!

    Have a nice holiday ....

    Terry.
  • kkollwitzkkollwitz Posts: 274
    "step 5 NEVER negotiate price, You tell him/her that you only negotiate profit.
    step 6 Buy the new car, truck or SUV at invoice ONLY."

    I'd say never negotiate anything except an out-the-door price. Invoice, MSRP, etc. are completely irrelevant to market conditions.

    However, I'm not an ex car salesman ;-)
  • audia8qaudia8q Posts: 3,138
    don't let all the so-called experts run your questions all over the place..There are a few real pro's on here who will be very helpful...There are also alot of people on here who "think" they are being helpfull but actually making your car buying experience diffucult and absurd.

    One of the best ways to come up with a good salesperson is to call the dealership and ask for the service manager. Tell him you are going to buy a truck and have it serviced at the dealership. Ask him/her if he can recommend a long term quality salesperson.

    This might be a little strange...but it usually works. The service mgr wants the work down the road and will almost always hook you up with the the dealership pro.

    Rich
  • tomm14tomm14 Posts: 15
    Okay thanks that helps.....the ex salesman seemed way off base....
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,225
    Especially a couple who tried and probably failed in the car business.

    There are also a LOT of dirtbags in the business.

    Rich had a pretty good idea. Go into the Service Dept. and ask a couple of the Service Advisors or even technicians. Maybe even a parts guy.

    I interviewed a salesman prospect yesterday who had just resigned from a nearby domestic store.

    I already knew what sort of a store it was but he shared some things with me I couldn't hardly believe. He had started six months ago and was one of the senior people. In six months, they had turned the management staff over three times.

    Hardcore...liner/closer store...the usual.

    Best advise? Ask your friends and neighbors for a referral.
  • kkollwitzkkollwitz Posts: 274
    "I already knew what sort of a store it was but he shared some things with me I couldn't hardly believe."

    So share already!
  • That's a new one Rich. I like it. In my experience the Service Manager would most indeed say "avoid so & so and ask for Frank or Rich (hey....)". Of course that's if you could get a hold of the Service Manager (oh...).
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,225
    Naw...I'm sure you know that type of store.

    Every month ten salespeople get fired or quit and ten more get hired etc...
  • Somebody says you should

    call the dealership and ask for the service manager. Tell him you are going to buy a truck and have it serviced at the dealership. Ask him/her if he can recommend a long term quality salesperson.

    I believe in most cases, there is no such thing as a "long term quality salesperson. They all only want one thing, Your money. Don't be too quick to give it up.

    read what current victims have to say about dirty car dealer tricks.
    go to

    www.badbusinessbureau.com/results.asp?q1=38&q2=&q3=&q4=&q5=&q6=&q7=&submit2=Search%21
    and read all of the dirty car dealer scams.

    If you don't like what I say, you just might be a car salesman.
  • landru2landru2 Posts: 638
    You might be capable of coherent thought.

    This guy was here with same stuff a few months ago. Sounds like he has an axe to grind with whatever Phoenix dealership fired him.

    It's really surprising that the local TV station didn't run with his ground-breaking revelations. (Is there really a guy there called Rich Skidmore?)
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,225
    Where do these trolls come from anyway...?
  • good sales people make my world go around Mr. Brohamski, take it easy. You ain't such a bad guy after all because you put Grant before Verde... you're cool. Now go listen to Cheech and Chong.
  • hoosierboyhoosierboy Posts: 25
    Yep, there really is a guy at the TV station named Rich Skidmore. He is the local muckraker here in Phoenix on Channel 3 tv. There tag line is "the place with more stuff"! I wish this cat would name the dealership that he has a problem with. I am curious to find out which one he used to work at.
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    The salesman who sold me my Dodge Ram in 1996 is still there; in fact, I have sent him referrals and I have received bird-dogs for it. He told me way back then that after a Chrysler sales seminar that was geared towards the "new" consumer who will buy by mail/fax/email/etc., he told his sales manager that he wanted those leads - he was able to tell pretty well who was serious and who wasn't by the way they worded their request. Last year, he was promoted to Internet Sales Director, and handles all leads from the dealer website as well as still doing floor sales.

    I sent the sales director of my day job there recently, and he came back to me and said it was the best car shopping experience he ever had - he leased a 2002 Dakota Quad Cab there instead of getting a Jeep Grand Cherokee somewhere else just because my Dodge guy was so straight with him.

    The assistant service manager is my "writer" - he remembers past problems and asks if they're ok. The same tech has worked on my truck the whole time I've had it; he too has a Ram and compares his to mine often to make sure that a problem on one truck is not occurring on the other.

    Quality dealer staff members really do exist. It's to the consumer's benefit to research and find them. Ask friends, neighbors, co-workers. And as much as we like to complain about these IDs, if you happen to see a sticker or license frame on a car from a dealer you may be considering, ask that driver about their experience.

    kcram
    Host
    Smart Shopper and FWI Message Boards
  • hingramhingram Posts: 24
    NEVER negotiate price, You tell him/her that you only negotiate profit.
    ======================

    I come from a family of car dealers. This is bad advice. You will end up with a car you don't want because the dealer will sell you a "deal" rather than a car.
  • rbrenton88rbrenton88 Posts: 186
    Who's schtick was it not too long ago about the '10 steps to buying a car'?

    I remember it being spammed all over these boards by some 'ex-salesman' just like this one.
  • draymond2draymond2 Posts: 134
    I called a local dealership and told the receptionist I was trying to reach someone I had recently talked to couldn't remember his name, but I know he was the top salesman at that dealership and had been there for a long time.etc.etc/ She put me through to the top salesperson, I had the easiest sales experience/best deal in buying a vehicle I ever had.

    I had never set foot in the dealership, until after the initial conversation to get me a contact person to deal with once I arrived.
  • mackabeemackabee Posts: 4,709
    good post. Head on over to "inconsiderate buyers" topic. I created it a few years back so it's been around for a while. Try reading from the first post, it should be in the archives. Good place to vent.

    : )

    Mackabee
  • ricci1ricci1 Posts: 2
    Sounds like alot of sales guys are on this board, what I want to know is when am I going to get a nice customer, someone who will keep there appointments, and not bust my [non-permissible content removed] over pennies. When I sell someone a car if I have been fair to them and given them a good price then, and they have been good to me, when they call and say "oh Justin I cant get an appointment for service for 2 weeks, or they have no loaners left, I will be the one who sorts it out gets them in for service or give them my demo, most dealers know what there competitors are selling there cars for and do the same, go with someone you feel comfortable with, cheapest isn't always best.
    I am currently buying a lexus IS 300 for my girl friend, I didn't drive 100 miles to get the cheapest price, I didn't go to the closest dealer, we didn't like the salesman, so we ended up in the middle she like the sales guy, and the place. They have a good reputation, so that was it. They where higher on a lease by about $10 a month, big deal, so they make an extra $300, its worth it to me to be treated right.
    And dont think once you've travelled 100 miles to save $50, that everything is good caus chances are that the cheapest guy is screwing you somewhere else to make it up. "Oh mister customer mats are extra, dealer prep extra,
    Thats my thought on the matter,
  • I am new to the automotive sales industry, and my goal is to make a career out of selling automobiles. That's right! It is not a job, or an in between thing, I am planning a career. I do not work on commissions rather a sales associate fee. I have a wife with whom i have 3 children with. Like other professions you do have your good, the bad, and the ugly, however you having a fast mouth makes you as low as they are. I am not here to take advantage of anyone; I am here to sell a product that best meets the customers needs, and save them money, while watching after the best interest of our wonderful dealership. There is not one dealership, or any business for that matter that is a non-profit organization. Not only are the employees taken care of in a profittable organization, but the customers and prospects are as well. We have the ability to gather more training aids for our sales reps, and order higher volume of inventory. All benefits from a business with a positive cash flow obviously benefits the customer and the dealership. My employer has put trust and faith in me, and with my core values, and hard work ethics will make me successful. People like yourself, and bad dealerships has tainted our profession. You are a negative influence to anything you do I am sure. I do not understand whos interest you are protecting, because with the comments you have made will insure the disgust in buying a new product. I just hope you can overcome that objection, and I wish you well. If you were to post a positive remark you sir, can make a difference.
  • travlertravler Posts: 138
    I've been selling cars for over 18 years, and most of this stuff being written is true. However, I've been at the same dealership for 12 years, and we DO NOT operate that way. Most of our staff are college educated, well spoken, and HONEST! Most of us have been here over 5,6,7 8 years or more. Our managers have been here for 15 to 20 years. We love our product,or company, and our customers.

    All dealers are not alike, but I hate to admit most are sterotypical. Best bet is to check with the Better Business Bureau in your area, or the Attorney General's office. Ask for the Consumer Protection Division. If there are law suits that have been won, or pending, I'd look elsewhere.

    You can also call the dealer and ask for the name of the salesman that has been there the longest (ask how long) This person has made a career of it and his integrity is important to him.

    I don't agree with the statement, "Don't be comfortable", or "don't like the salesman." If you do your homework buying a new vehicle can be an enjoyable experience. If you catch the salesman in a lie, politely excuse yourself and find someone else. Do some phone conversations first. If you're comfortable, schedule a meeting.

    I will not and cannot work with a hostile customer. If they don't trust me I will find someone else to help them.

    If you do your homework, and look at it as an adventure, you'll enjoy the process. Good luck, and happy shopping. :) ">
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Translation please. What exactly does "Hardcore...liner/closer store" mean?
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    This is in continuation of the "Any Questions for a Car Dealer" topic which has now been made read-only. Snakeweasel asked if race made a difference in buying.

    I said that I had read a study saying that well-dressed women got the *worst* deal (forgot to add it was "well-dressed white women." )

    Out of curiousity, I did a little more research. If you're interested, do a google for car buyers race gender best deal. I found an excellent article in Woman Motorist that quoted research by Ian Ayres (or Ayers, it was spelled both ways). He has done research in law and economics. In a nutshell, he found that white women get the best deal from African-American men; African-American women got the best deal from white men; and both white men and African-American men got the best deal from white female salespeople.

    So, contrary to what you might expect, working with someone of your own race and gender is not likely to help you, and might hinder you.

    Of course the point is also made that the best way to get the best deal is to be prepared, know what you want, and spend enough time researching BEFORE you get to the dealer's showroom. And don't spend a lot of time with any one dealer either on the phone or in person. The more time you spend the more invested you'll be in making a deal at that particular place, which can work against you.
  • audia8qaudia8q Posts: 3,138
    He has done research in law and economics. In a nutshell, he found that white women get the best deal from African-American men; African-American women got the best deal from white men; and both white men and African-American men got the best deal from white female salespeople.

    Interesting...But the study needs to address some issues..."what is the best deal?" is it the lowest price? is it the best service? is it the best quality dealership? did the buyers have credit problems? etc.. Everyone has a different opinion of the best deal. It has been debated here on edmunds and alot of folks have different ideas of the best deal...
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    I believe that particular study was looking at lowest price as defining the best deal.

    It made for very interesting reading, because the questions asked by the salespeople about whether the customer had been to other dealers, was the person pre-qualified, etc., varied between the races and genders of the potential customer. I thought it was fascinating that working with someone of a different race than one's own was more likely to result in a better deal; I would have guessed the opposite.

    I was not suprised that both women and men got a better deal from a salesperson of the opposite gender.

    When I helped a white male friend of mine buy a car a couple years ago, we got the best deal from an African-American salesman. Literally African-American, he had immigrated from a western African country a few years ago. I had lived in Ghana for a while so we talked about that. Helped to establish some common ground, perhaps.
  • He has done research in law and economics. In a nutshell, he found that white women get the best deal from African-American men; African-American women got the best deal from white men; and both white men and African-American men got the best deal from white female salespeople.



    People will do a study for anything.

    Any negotiation for a car starts at a higher price, and stops when the buyer either stops negotiation or walks away.

    If a salesman isn't trying to maximise his profit, he isn't doing his job. And if I as a buyer stop negotiation too soon, I'm not doing my job.
  • "If a salesman isn't trying to maximise his profit, he isn't doing his job. And if I as a buyer stop negotiation too soon, I'm not doing my job."

    This is very true.

    The problem is, of course, that many Americans have social issues and they are incapable of having a forward, businesslike conversation. The result is car salesman that have to act aggressive in order to complete the deal.

    If customers would just come in and bluntly declare what their objectives were the car buying experience would be much better for them. But instead they are timid. They get upset and go home and write nasty fabrications on the Internet.
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    ...sales personnel could offer the exact same deal to everyone, say $200 over invoice, and then there would be no need for customers to get upset. Or write nasty fabrications. And there would be no need for social science researchers to spend the time and effort on research studies.

    Since that is never going to happen anywhere outside of Carmax or Saturn dealerships, then there will be differences in the deals that salesmen offer and that customers negotiate. Therefore there is fertile ground for researchers to find out why Person A gets a better deal than Person B.

    I hope, basscadet, that you're not saying that the article I referred to is "nasty fabrications." It's not. If you're interested, read it for yourself. Might give you food for thought.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    I don't think carmax and saturn are $200 over invoice. Besides for many (most?) buyers there is still a trade in value to negotiate.

    I have not found much need to negotiate for our last two new cars bought in 1997 and 2005. Maybe this is becuase we live in an area that is very price sensitive...so dealers know that they better give you a pretty good price up front or they may never see you again.
  • cticti Posts: 134
    Interesting. I wonder WHY this would be so. Was the sales person more accomodating to the buyer? Or did the buyer just push harder?
  • golicgolic Posts: 714
    This is a great post *nodnod*, now I have great reason to tell wife why I am cruising the saleswomem at the dealership..

    "but honey, I am only flirting with her to save US money"

    Now, since I am 5'10 male with blonde hair and blue eyes I wonder what kind of 'bra' I should be looking for on this new car. *snicker*
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    It was my impression that the sales people were more accommodating (perhaps unwittingly so) to different people, depending on the interaction of gender and race.

    Did you read the article? I found it very interesting that the questions asked to qualify the buyer varied so much.

    We all make judgements based on first impressions; that's just a fact of life. What's interesting is seeing how those judgements translate into different buying and selling behavior.

    You ever find yourself just plain on-guard or annoyed with some people, for no real reason, or really "clicking" with someone, again for no reason you can put your finger on? I find social science research fascinating because it attempts to codify those reasons, or at least acknowledges that different reactions exist.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,739
    I just have to ask, since I didn't ask the question why are you responding to me?

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • Therefore there is fertile ground for researchers to find out why Person A gets a better deal than Person B.

    Here is my fertile answer to those fertile grounds - Person A got a better deal because he knew more about the car buying process than Person B.

    Looking beyond the obvious isn't really necessary here.
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    You had asked the question in another topic if race made a difference when buying a car. Then the hosts shut down that topic and transferred it here.

    The article I'm referring to was one by a researcher who discovered that indeed the interplay of race and gender does make a difference, but not in the way you might think. You're better off with someone opposite to yourself, rather than like yourself, which is surprising.
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    Maybe yes, maybe no, about the only difference being one person knew more about the car buying process than another.

    If you think so, fine.

    Seems to me the research indicates otherwise.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,739
    Geekay asked the question. I just, in a bored yet silly mood, made a wise guy remark about race (as in car races).

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • bobstbobst Posts: 1,783
    Maybe people of one race or ethinc group try harder to get the sales person to accept a lower price. Years ago, I actually heard that was the case.
  • biancarbiancar Mid-AtlanticPosts: 965
    ...or could be the salesperson is going out of his/her way to NOT appear prejudiced.

    Who knows. Interesting data, anyway.
This discussion has been closed.