How To Find a Good Car Mechanic

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 10,237
edited February 2016 in General
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How To Find a Good Car Mechanic

By using online review sites like Yelp, you can find a good car mechanic in your area. Here are a few tips on what to look for and what to avoid.

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Comments

  • annawalesannawales Member Posts: 1
    Here's another good article from edmunds that can help for those who like to use the web and apps to get all there stuff done. http://www.edmunds.com/car-news/need-car-repair-theres-an-app-for-that.html
  • mwatkins7111mwatkins7111 Member Posts: 1
    EXTREMELY IMPORTANT INFO IF CONSIDERING BUSINESS WITH MIDWEST MUSTANG- Avoid business with this company no matter what. I took my car in to replace the transmission. The mechanic torched giant baseball sized holes into the structural part of the frame which connects the front end of the car to the rest of it. They admitted to cutting the holes, then denied it once I took them to court. The judge found that they lied in their testimony. The car was totaled in the process. If they did it to me, they will certainly do it to others, and will not inform you. They are not concerned with safety. A certified collision specialist testified that air bags will not work anymore, the car will crumple on impact, or even just hitting a pothole. They put my life in danger, and will put yours in danger as well.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonMember Posts: 20,338
    I don't know if slamming a business in a public forum is a wise thing to do. You could get sued. Hopefully a moderator will see this and take it down. If not I think you should.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Member Posts: 5,535
    edited July 2016
    First it makes no sense to allege that the car was totaled. When you look at what good body guys can fix today anything can be repaired. It just comes down to someone being willing to pay enough to do so. The real question right now is, what exactly needed to be done and why. Without details and especially some photo's readers have to speculate and I can think of a scenario where some body cutting might have been required.

    When some parts of today's cars are manufactured a structural body nut might end up inside an enclosed channel. Rear cradle mount bolts on many front wheel drive cars are like this. I can imagine that the cross member for the transmission mount might be like this. (mwatkins didn't say what kind of a car he has although it is suggested that it might be a Mustang). This is fine provided that the assembly doesn't rust and seize and the bolt that goes through it can be removed and reinstalled during a repair. When they do seize up, the bolt might not be removable and break, or the body nut releases from inside the channel and just spins again making it un-removable. Now remember the nut is captured inside the channel. When something like this happens, the body nut isn't accessible without cutting a hole in the channel. It isn't a shop or techs fault that some parts are built that way. When facing a problem like this when they occur the issue becomes, who communicated what to whom and when. If the body channel was so rusted and failing that repairing the body nut was going to take essentially rebuilding a major section of the underside of the car then that, like it or not, suddenly becomes part of the repair.

    If what I'm thinking occurred is correct, then:

    There can be questions asked about the work environment inside the shop and how well things are communicated. There would be a question about the tech involved, and what reasons might he/she have had for not communicating with management if an issue with a body nut occurred. There are even questions that need to be asked since the shop may actually have done everything right and when they attempted to communicate the situation, the poster may have refused to listen and has even turned around and attacked them for their troubles.

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