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Underfloor Storage - 2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited December 2014 in Jeep
imageUnderfloor Storage - 2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited Long-Term Road Test

The underfloor storage in our long-term 2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited keeps small items from ping-ponging around the vehicle's vast expanse of cargo space.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • That underfloor storage organizer is a great idea, though I would be concerned about damaging the hatch seal with the hook. I can see the hook end potentially ripping the seal or pulling it out of its seat.
  • legacygtlegacygt Posts: 599
    Looking at this you have to wonder if they might have been able to lower the floor and liftover height for the rear cargo area. I would gladly sacrifice the hidden storage if it meant the floor was lower and easier to access. Cargo volume would also increase. These are all areas where the Cherokee lags the class. There might be other structural and suspension limitations but from the photo it looks like pretty much the entire cargo area could be a few inches lower.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    The storage organizer does not come with Cherokees equipped with a full-size spare tire. There is no room for it.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Well worth the trade-off. I'll take "Spare Tires" for $200, Alex.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    legacygt said:

    Looking at this you have to wonder if they might have been able to lower the floor and liftover height for the rear cargo area. I would gladly sacrifice the hidden storage if it meant the floor was lower and easier to access. Cargo volume would also increase. These are all areas where the Cherokee lags the class. There might be other structural and suspension limitations but from the photo it looks like pretty much the entire cargo area could be a few inches lower.

    I don't see that as a problem. I'd much rather have a higher cargo floor if it means a full-size spare tire will fit. All Cherokees with the trailer tow package and all Cherokee Trailhawks come with a full-size spare. A lower load floor likely won't accommodate a full-size spare. If you're going to tow or go off road, a full-size spare is a must-have. Not having one is foolish.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    edited December 2014
    legacygt said:

    Looking at this you have to wonder if they might have been able to lower the floor and liftover height for the rear cargo area. I would gladly sacrifice the hidden storage if it meant the floor was lower and easier to access. Cargo volume would also increase. These are all areas where the Cherokee lags the class. There might be other structural and suspension limitations but from the photo it looks like pretty much the entire cargo area could be a few inches lower.

    Unlike other vehicles in this class, the Cherokee is engineered to tow 4,500 pounds (properly equipped) and go off road. The higher load floor is there to accomadate a full-size spare. If towing or off-roading is not on your agenda, and if max load space is more important, perhaps you should look at a different vehicle.

    Jeep has to fill that "rugged image" need, as it's part of the brand DNA.
  • legacygtlegacygt Posts: 599
    rsholland said:

    legacygt said:

    Looking at this you have to wonder if they might have been able to lower the floor and liftover height for the rear cargo area. I would gladly sacrifice the hidden storage if it meant the floor was lower and easier to access. Cargo volume would also increase. These are all areas where the Cherokee lags the class. There might be other structural and suspension limitations but from the photo it looks like pretty much the entire cargo area could be a few inches lower.

    Unlike other vehicles in this class, the Cherokee is engineered to tow 4,500 pounds (properly equipped) and go off road. The higher load floor is there to accomadate a full-size spare. If towing or off-roading is not on your agenda, and if max load space is more important, perhaps you should look at a different vehicle.

    Jeep has to fill that "rugged image" need, as it's part of the brand DNA.
    I like that the Cherokee is true to the Jeep image and can be a truly capable vehicle (unlike the Patriot/Compass). But I was under the impression that the cargo area of the Cherokee was compromised because of the suspension, AWD system or some structural reason. Now it seems that it was really just to fit the full sized spare under the floor in some models. There happen to be other options for a full size spare. The original Cherokee had one against the wall in the cargo area. There's also the exterior mounting option. Neither of these is perfect. They both represent different compromises. But they do allow for a lower floor and larger cargo area for models that don't have the full size spare. I imagine that most Cherokee buyers will not have the full size spare; the Edmunds car is pretty well equipped and it doesn't have it. But importantly, the Cherokee (like it or not) is going to be cross shopped with the CRV and CX5 and Forester, etc. These cars all have much more useful cargo areas than the Cherokee. To me the Cherokee's biggest flaw is the cargo area. Everything else about it is impressive and I've even come to terms with the styling.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    edited December 2014
    legacygt said:

    rsholland said:

    legacygt said:

    Looking at this you have to wonder if they might have been able to lower the floor and liftover height for the rear cargo area. I would gladly sacrifice the hidden storage if it meant the floor was lower and easier to access. Cargo volume would also increase. These are all areas where the Cherokee lags the class. There might be other structural and suspension limitations but from the photo it looks like pretty much the entire cargo area could be a few inches lower.

    Unlike other vehicles in this class, the Cherokee is engineered to tow 4,500 pounds (properly equipped) and go off road. The higher load floor is there to accomadate a full-size spare. If towing or off-roading is not on your agenda, and if max load space is more important, perhaps you should look at a different vehicle.

    Jeep has to fill that "rugged image" need, as it's part of the brand DNA.
    I like that the Cherokee is true to the Jeep image and can be a truly capable vehicle (unlike the Patriot/Compass). But I was under the impression that the cargo area of the Cherokee was compromised because of the suspension, AWD system or some structural reason. Now it seems that it was really just to fit the full sized spare under the floor in some models. There happen to be other options for a full size spare. The original Cherokee had one against the wall in the cargo area. There's also the exterior mounting option. Neither of these is perfect. They both represent different compromises. But they do allow for a lower floor and larger cargo area for models that don't have the full size spare. I imagine that most Cherokee buyers will not have the full size spare; the Edmunds car is pretty well equipped and it doesn't have it. But importantly, the Cherokee (like it or not) is going to be cross shopped with the CRV and CX5 and Forester, etc. These cars all have much more useful cargo areas than the Cherokee. To me the Cherokee's biggest flaw is the cargo area. Everything else about it is impressive and I've even come to terms with the styling.
    Of all the spare tire locations that you've mentioned, keeping it under the cargo floor makes the most sense.

    The only thing that separates the Jeep brand from all the CUV/SUVs out there is their off-road heritage. They have to be better at that than the competition. In doing so there are compromises made; some good, some not so good. While cargo area may be a bit less than a Forester. etc., it's not that much less. Also it has a fold-flat front passenger seat to give even more cargo flexibility, a class-exclusive I think. Finally the rear seat slides forward to increase the cargo area if needed.

    The cargo space (or lack-there-of) is not be a deal-breaker for me, and it is certainly has not been hurting sales. In fact it's the best selling Jeep. Last month I believe it was fifth in sales in it's segment, and ahead of the Forester.

    I've been to a lot of Jeep dealers checking out the Cherokee, and most of them are equipped with the tow package with the full-size spare, at least that's the case here on the Delmarva peninsula.
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