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Off the Hook - 2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,112
edited December 2014 in Ford
imageOff the Hook - 2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

Ineffective seatbelt keeper in the Edmunds long-term 2015 Ford Mustang GT.

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Comments

  • banhughbanhugh Posts: 315
    That Recaro seat surely looks awesome. Seems to be pretty firm though. How comfortable is it?
  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisPosts: 509
    GM used to integrate the seatbelts into the shoulder point of the seat. For example, in old Buicks, many trucks and SUVs, etc. Why can't they do this for coupes nowadays?
  • rat73rat73 Posts: 6
    Well, one week down and three totally insubstantial posts that don't convey much of anything about the car. I hope the pace picks up a bit.
  • Gotta love Mercedes' solution
  • I don't know why they didn't angle the hook more towards the front of the car. The magnetic strap they use on the non-recaro seats actually works quite well.
  • @banhugh they are extremely comfortable...at least for short trips. They are firm and heavily bolstered but not too narrow (I' 5'8" 215lbs. and I fit great). They are more confining which can hamper comfort over a longer jaunt when you might want to shift positions occasionally. My friend has Recaro's in his Mustang and his wife complains about a lack of lumbar support on long trips. YMMV.
  • RAT73: we're still in the break-in period. The fun can't start just yet, but it will...it...will...
  • RAT73: we're still in the break-in period. The fun can't start just yet, but it will...it...will...

    To me that makes the problem even worse. We are going to go from three tiny little posts to a constant flow of how 'fun' it is. While it is entertaining reading post after post about burn-outs, high speed runs and track time they aren't actually as useful to me as a prospective buyer as a simple post about the seat belt having an annoyance. I want to know how the car is to live with in day to day use. I'd be going to the grocery store more than doing burn outs and driving for an hour to get to work with a couple fun off ramp and on ramp bursts more than driving a random twisty back road far above the legal limit.

    That brings us to the other problem that is a constant and often brought up about your test cars. They had a similar mid $40,000 version on display at the mall the other day. The interior looked great. So I went online and looked up a mid $20,000 model and the interior, while not terrible, was no where close to the look of the twice as expensive model. One of those two cars would be a much nicer place to spend a lot of time. And the overall feel and experience of owning the two cars would be different.
    To me the purpose of a long term test is to know how the car would be to live with. Start getting the trim levels and options that are most common. Do reviews of the crazy fun versions but let us know how it is to live with the rental car trim level rather than the don't care what I spend trim level.

  • I think the implication of Zim's comment, with a lot of which I agree, is to get an actual mid-20s Mustang, the Ecoboost with mid-level equipment, to answer the questions of people who want a Mustang but won't be spending big(ger) money on one.

    As to the seat issue, I' own a car with the snap-belt strap. Worthless, in my experience. I grab the strap reaching back down at floor level than around at the top, and it's fine. I do agree, GM's old system of integrating the belt in the seat was a great solution, and showed it doesn't have to be in just a premium car. Only trouble I recall is that it thickened at least the outer seat area and when the question is ingress/egress into a tight back seat, a new problem could be created.
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