Road Trip Snow Mode - 2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 10,315
edited January 2015 in Jeep
imageRoad Trip Snow Mode - 2014 Jeep Cherokee Limited Long-Term Road Test

Notes about the Selec-Terrain system and its Snow Mode, as Edmunds editor James Riswick sets out in the long-term 2014 Jeep Cherokee to a place far better suited to its capabilities: snowy Oregon.

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Comments

  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin Member Posts: 509
    Sounds like a great trip! I can't help but love the styling of this thing, particularly in Limited trim. The chrome wheels look right at home.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    edited January 2015
    James, you commented on the CRV and Escape vs the Cherokee, can you also make any reference or comparison to a Subaru Outback or Forester?

    I know the Subaru AWD systems are full-time units, therefore proactive, not reactive.
  • fordson1fordson1 Unconfirmed Posts: 1,512
    Going to ski areas midwinter with no snow brush - check.
  • vvkvvk Member Posts: 196
    rsholland, Subaru uses two types of AWD in its non-STi cars. Simple, light, compact viscous limited-slip center diff in manual transmission cars and a more sophisticated electronic clutch pack in automatic transmission cars. The latter system is similar to what is used in the Cherokee. Both can be considered proactive, since they are tied to stability control but Cherokee system is more sophisticated and a little more proactive.

    Manual transmission Subarus have purely reactive system that car easily leave you stranded or sideways if you have all-season tires.

    When you say full-time, you mean that torque is always transferred to all four wheels. This is actually not quite the case with automatic transmission Subarus. They are primarily front-wheel-drive in steady driving. Unlike manual transmission Subarus that have 50/50 front/rear torque split unless there is a loss of traction.
  • legacygtlegacygt Member Posts: 599
    This is a minor ergonomic thing but it seems silly to have knob for Selec-Terrain but the actual selection is displayed with a light next to a "list" that would be under your palm or wrist while your turning the knob. I'd much rather see the 4 selections appear around the knob with a simple line on the knob pointing to each one as you turn it.
  • subiefanil83subiefanil83 Member Posts: 2
    Subaru's AWD is very full time with the automatic transmissions. Starting with the 2009 Forester, the torque split of the auto has been shifted to 60/40. That conversion followed each new model generation since then. Even with the older 90/10 system, steady driving did not mean steady torque split. That clutch was doing a whole lot more than many people thought it was. Don't forget the Cherokee's AWD system has a rear axle disconnect that physically disconnects the rear axle when AWD is not needed.
  • allthingshondaallthingshonda Member Posts: 878
    edited January 2015

    Subaru's AWD is very full time with the automatic transmissions. Starting with the 2009 Forester, the torque split of the auto has been shifted to 60/40. That conversion followed each new model generation since then. Even with the older 90/10 system, steady driving did not mean steady torque split. That clutch was doing a whole lot more than many people thought it was. Don't forget the Cherokee's AWD system has a rear axle disconnect that physically disconnects the rear axle when AWD is not needed.

    I always thought Subarus were bias to RWD. The engine is longitudinal and there is a very obvious rear differential, What I mean is I thought most of the power was sent to the rear under normal conditions. I know all four wheels have power sent to them all the time making Subaru a true all time all wheel drive system.
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