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Tire Repair - 2015 Porsche Macan S Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited February 2015 in Porsche
imageTire Repair - 2015 Porsche Macan S Long-Term Road Test

Our long-term 2015 Porsche Macan S picked up a nail and fired off the TPMS.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • cjasiscjasis Posts: 274
    The tires on the Macan might be different but as I recall, Porsche goes out of their way to claim that you should NEVER patch a tire on their cars. They believe it compromises the tires high speed capabilities.
  • desmoliciousdesmolicious Posts: 671
    edited February 2015
    As I sit here in LA bumper to bumper traffic, I ponder my tyres' high speed capabilities.
  • cjasis said:

    The tires on the Macan might be different but as I recall, Porsche goes out of their way to claim that you should NEVER patch a tire on their cars. They believe it compromises the tires high speed capabilities.

    I don't know why something like this would be specific to Porsche. If anything, it would be recommended by the tire manufacturer or just by general speed rating guidelines. For most people, I don't think patching is a big deal (although plugging is entirely different and I'd never recommend that) unless one drives in a pretty spirited manner on a regular basis. If I had a puncture in a tire that didn't have much treat left, I'd probably just replace the tire with a new one. I've had 2 or 3 tires patched in recent memory, all without future problems.

    The main exception for patching tires that I can think of is concerning a car being driven in Germany, for example, where triple digit speeds are legal on various motorways. Regardless of tire type, speed rating, quality of the repair, etc. I simply wouldn't want to trust a patched tire that's regularly subjected to high speeds for extended distances.
  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisPosts: 509
    I gotta say, that black plastic cladding looks pretty awful on the white Macan.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,119
    edited February 2015
    The only acceptable repair is one that requires the tire be removed from the wheel so that the tire can be inspected for any damage, and then a patch-plug is used as described in this article from Tire Rack. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=77
    It is correct that the recommendation is more closely related to the tire manufacturers than the vehicles and the linked article explains that and why.
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