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Type of oil

k2auk2au Posts: 3
edited May 2015 in Lexus
The manual for the 2012 Lexus LS460 says to use 0-20 w Oil. Is this Fully Synthetic or a Synthetic Blend ?
Any Help would be appreaciated
Thanks

Comments

  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,092
    edited May 2015
    According to service information service intervals of 5000 miles are required and it only specifies API oil which would be the current SN and ILSAC GF5. That is definitely NOT a synthetic that is required, it is going to be a Group II or Group III base stock product based on what ever brand you choose. "Synthetic" and especially products labeled "Synthetic Blend" in North America can be a Group II base stock with a little Group III plus, a Group IV or a Group V added to it to qualify for the latter and may be nothing but a Group III plus for the former because the word synthetic isn't restricted here like it is in Europe where a product would have to be a Group IV, V, or VI to be labeled a synthetic.

    If you want to choose a superior product than the minimum that your car requires, any brand that has GM's dexos approval (the green label on the front of the bottle) and or is approved for ACEA A1/B1 A5/B5 would provide much better protection for not just the engine but the emissions system as well.
  • k2auk2au Posts: 3
    Thanks for the explanation on the oils. It sure was easier years ago with basically one type of oil, with different weights.
    I've always kept my oil clean on other cars and used a quality oil.
    When I went to the auto store I didn't realize that the synthetic oils were not pure. Thanks for clearing that up
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,092
    There is a lot of confusion when it comes to many products today. First anything that meets API SN and ILSAC GF5 are vastly superior to the SM and ILSAC GF3 or 4, but the reality is the API and ILSAC standards are still just a minimal standard and do not certify that a given product meets the specs for many newer cars. That's why GM went to the licensing requirements for their dexos specification. A product has to be at least a Group III plus to meet that specification. In fact much of the push back from some companies when it came to the requirements to prove that their product met the specs came from the difference in the cost of the base group stock and the additive package that was required to meet the spec (close to a dollar per quart), not the eight cents for the licensing per quart. The other advantage for the consumer with GM's dexos approval is that you have no way to otherwise know exactly what base stock a given brand decided to use when they manufacture their product. Since dexos requires at least a Group III plus, or a Group IV you are assured of getting a product that far exceeds anything made with the conventional Group II, or Group II plus.

    https://mobiloil.com/en/article/car-maintenance/learn-about-motor-oil-facts/synthetic-oil-vs-conventional-oil

    https://mobiloil.com/en/article/car-maintenance/learn-about-motor-oil-facts/types-of-synthetic-oil

    http://www.pennzoil.com/learn-about-motor-oil/synthetic-oil/

    From that Pennzoil link.

    Myth: Synthetics made from Group III base oils are not true synthetics and are not as good as PAO-based synthetics in Group IV. Again, untrue. Synthetics made from Group III oil can, in some cases, outperform those made in Group IV oils in some areas of performance.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,092
    There is a lot of confusion when it comes to many products today. First anything that meets API SN and ILSAC GF5 are vastly superior to the SM and ILSAC GF3 or 4, but the reality is the API and ILSAC standards are still just a minimal standard and do not certify that a given product meets the specs for many newer cars. That's why GM went to the licensing requirements for their dexos specification. A product has to be at least a Group III plus to meet that specification. In fact much of the push back from some companies when it came to the requirements to prove that their product met the specs came from the difference in the cost of the base group stock and the additive package that was required to meet the spec (close to a dollar per quart), not the eight cents for the licensing per quart. The other advantage for the consumer with GM's dexos approval is that you have no way to otherwise know exactly what base stock a given brand decided to use when they manufacture their product. Since dexos requires at least a Group III plus, or a Group IV you are assured of getting a product that far exceeds anything made with the conventional Group II, or Group II plus.

    https://mobiloil.com/en/article/car-maintenance/learn-about-motor-oil-facts/synthetic-oil-vs-conventional-oil

    https://mobiloil.com/en/article/car-maintenance/learn-about-motor-oil-facts/types-of-synthetic-oil

    http://www.pennzoil.com/learn-about-motor-oil/synthetic-oil/

    From that Pennzoil link.

    Myth: Synthetics made from Group III base oils are not true synthetics and are not as good as PAO-based synthetics in Group IV. Again, untrue. Synthetics made from Group III oil can, in some cases, outperform those made in Group IV oils in some areas of performance.
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