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Correct Thermostat - 1997 LeSabre

dewc3dewc3 Posts: 35
edited June 2015 in Buick
Hi, I live in Florida and was wondering what is the correct thermostat I should be using here. The guy at the auto parts store said 180 is the one I need. Just need some feedback as to which is better, 180 or 195?

Comments

  • ryanjj14ryanjj14 Posts: 4
    I believe you'll need the 195 degree thermostat.
  • dewc3dewc3 Posts: 35
    Ok I had purchased the 180 per auto parts store, and the car ran fine for 3 days but now the car is wanting to start reaching the 200 mark. So I will have to go back and get the 195 temp thermostat. Now on top of the thermostat housing it has a bleeder screw. Am I suppose to bleed the system and if so how do I do that?
  • ryanjj14ryanjj14 Posts: 4
    You don't necessarily have to bleed the system.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 4,985
    The O.E. specification thermostat is the 195f. To get the temperature you posted, are you looking at the temperature gage on the dash or are you watching scan data from the PCM? Is the temperature climbing at idle or is this occurring on the highway? What impact does turning on the AC on the engine temperature?
  • dewc3dewc3 Posts: 35
    The 200 temp posted is just looking at the guage, no scan has been done as of yet and the temp climbs as the car has been going down the road for a few minutes and the AC works but just doesnt blow out the middle vents which is another thing that is being worked on
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 4,985
    The dash gage cannot be relied on as an accurate representation of the engines actual temperature. It will show you if the engine is overheating, but it isn't accurate enough to be used for judging normal operating temperatures.

    The questions about AC operation are actually in reference to the engine cooling fan. With the AC turned on the cooling fans operate differently then when it is not. The AC requires that the fans are running at all lower engine (vehicle) speeds while without the AC on the fans won't be turned on until the engine temperature reaches approximately 221f . Therefore a higher idling temperature without the AC being turned on would be normal.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,285
    edited July 2015
    dewc3 said:

    Ok I had purchased the 180 per auto parts store, and the car ran fine for 3 days but now the car is wanting to start reaching the 200 mark. So I will have to go back and get the 195 temp thermostat. Now on top of the thermostat housing it has a bleeder screw. Am I suppose to bleed the system and if so how do I do that?

    You should have gotten the 195 deg thermostat. That's what the control system are set up to expect for controlling the engine as it's warming up and running. The 195 thermostat will be completely open at around 195 and you'll see temps around 200 as a baseline for the system. That's what the system was engineered to operate at.

    Bleeding:
    You should bleed the system with the bleeder screw after you've burped the air out of the heater, especially if you took some coolant out of the radiator with a siphon to avoid all the spill when taking off the thermostat housing to switch the thermostat. To clear the heater, after the engine has thorough warmed up, like a 5-minute drive in your climate, run the engine at 2500 rpm for 10 seconds or so, then idle, and repeat 4 more times. I like to park with the radiator higher than the heater on my driveway which slopes some uphill to the garage. Then idle.

    Idea to bleed using the screw is to wait until you start engine after it has cooled substantially and it is starting to warm up again. Then open bleed screw using a towel to catch fluid which it comes out after any air and the towel can protect you from splattered hot coolant. Do not try to bleed by waiting after running engine until it starts cooling down: the cooling system will suck in air as the coolant is contracting as it cools.

    Then be sure the reservoir is properly filled and allow car to cool. Open radiator cap to be sure radiator is still full of coolant.

    Without the AC on and the fans commanded on low speed all the time, the coolant goes up to 215 or so easily when stopped and outside ambient above 80. When it hits 220 or more the fans turn on high to reduce temp and then turn off. If AC is on fans operate on low until coolant temp rises too much (or freon pressures increase too much from heat) and then fans switch to high speed.

    Thermostat:
    You likely did it right but let me ask to be sure you replaced the rubber o-ring that the thermostat fits into with the new stat AND the edge of the thermostat is in the slit on the inside of the o-ring AND the capsule of thermostat is down into the intake manifold.

    AND is the Dexcool in good shape with no crud sludging up looking into the radiator from someone putting old green coolant in with Dexcool?

    Good luck.


    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • dewc3dewc3 Posts: 35
    Ty imidazol97 for all your help!! I finally got the overheating part corrected but the radiator is shot, so before I purchase a new radiator and install it, what is the best way to flush the block and whats in the heater core to make sure I have everything cleaned out before I install the new radiator and new antifreeze?? The last thing I want is discolored water mixing in with the new stuff.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,285
    If you don't have a reverse flush system that can add bubbles and pressure the water backwards through everything, I'd just take off the lower radiator hose and take off the thermostat housing and run water through from a garden hose nozzle.

    I believe there are block drains on that but I believe, remembering posts from others, that one is where a knock sensor is screwed in on the front.

    I would not try to take off a heater hose at the tensioner. I don't like disturbing anything and possibly having a leak when putting it back on.

    That radiator is easy to replace. I had one crack on the top shoulder that seeped only when the pressure was up on it. I bought an AC Delco/Delphi replacement on Rockauto but it was identical to the one I took out. Just take off the plastic top support after removing the air box for the air intake. Loosen the bolts for the fans. Take off the transmission cooler lines. Lift out.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

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