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Suspension Walkaround - 2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited June 2015 in Ford
imageSuspension Walkaround - 2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

We've been massively impressed with the four-wheel independent suspension that underpins our 2015 Ford Mustang GT, so we raised the car on our Rotary Lift to have a look.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • mtnbiker8mtnbiker8 Posts: 39
    The one aspect of the rear suspension that I find perplexing is the sub-frame bushings that attach the integral sub-frame to the chassis. They are really soft and allow a LOT of unwanted, undamped motion that impacts the entire suspension. Watch any YouTube video of this car accelerating and you'll hear intermittent chirps. Stock, the 2015 has a lot of wheel hop. There are quite a few aftermarket mods that address the issue and minimize, or eliminate sub-frame movement. I went with solid Delrin bushings. Surprisingly, there really isn't a lot of additional harshness - on a newly paved road you can't tell the difference. Really improves off the line acceleration (the car hooks up much better) and handling/control when you release your inner hooligan. You know you will. There was no need to make this sports/muscle car this soft from the factory - particularly the performance package version. Oh, and the rear shocks are a little too bouncy - I replaced those too and am much happier. As always, Mustang is a pallet. The aftermarket is huge. The car can be molded into anything you want. But it has amazing bones. Good job Ford!
  • defyant15defyant15 Posts: 74
    Thanks mtn....
    mtnbiker8 said:

    The one aspect of the rear suspension that I find perplexing is the sub-frame bushings that attach the integral sub-frame to the chassis. They are really soft and allow a LOT of unwanted, undamped motion that impacts the entire suspension. Watch any YouTube video of this car accelerating and you'll hear intermittent chirps. Stock, the 2015 has a lot of wheel hop. There are quite a few aftermarket mods that address the issue and minimize, or eliminate sub-frame movement. I went with solid Delrin bushings. Surprisingly, there really isn't a lot of additional harshness - on a newly paved road you can't tell the difference. Really improves off the line acceleration (the car hooks up much better) and handling/control when you release your inner hooligan. You know you will. There was no need to make this sports/muscle car this soft from the factory - particularly the performance package version. Oh, and the rear shocks are a little too bouncy - I replaced those too and am much happier. As always, Mustang is a pallet. The aftermarket is huge. The car can be molded into anything you want. But it has amazing bones. Good job Ford!

    Have you considered this
    http://www.mustang6g.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23215

    I considered changing out the bushings but I do enjoy that BMW like last inch of softness in the suspension (firm but soft at the limit).

  • socal_ericsocal_eric SoCalPosts: 189
    Excellent to see another suspension article. It's been too long and would be great to see more tech articles like this.
  • bimer320bimer320 Posts: 29
    Great article. very informing love the detail of weighing the wheel/tire combo.
  • mtnbiker8mtnbiker8 Posts: 39
    defyant15 - The BMR braces are getting very good reviews. Solid product. I installed BMR Delrin bushings (a full replacement). I think the braces are a far more practical solutions for most folks. I installed the Delrin solution - a real PITA but did it myself so it was economical. Either way - it takes the handling to the next level. Best of what a solid axle would do with composure and suppleness of an IRS. Ford did a nice job on this one.
  • defyant15defyant15 Posts: 74
    Thanks mtn...I found your thread on the Viking shocks on the forum, that seems like a sensible focused mod rather than the I'll replace everything without knowing what I'm doing"attitude so many people have.

    I want a solution with which I can maintain stock ride height for the commute and lower for days I want to auto-x or go gangbusters on mountain roads - might end up looking at coilovers. The FRPP kit is also super tempting but those do lower the car and are not adjustable...and not many reviews in yet. I will prolly be going with the BMR braces as regardless those seem like a winning product.
  • mtnbiker8mtnbiker8 Posts: 39
    defyant15 - talking to the mechanic at our local DIY shop. He recommends having a goal in mind for a car before going down the customizing road. It will keep you from waking up one morning and saying ... "crap, I own a racing car and I hate driving it."
  • sgtdenversgtdenver Posts: 5
    It's too bad the "ultra-compact" IRS didn't leave any more leg room or trunk space when a less sophisticated IRS design would have done the job for less.
  • mtnbiker8mtnbiker8 Posts: 39
    If leg room and trunk space is a priority there is always the Camry.
  • sgtdenversgtdenver Posts: 5
    mtnbiker8 said:

    If leg room and trunk space is a priority there is always the Camry.

    Then why bother with a back seat at all? And why go to the trouble of engineering a complex IRS in order to save space when it doesn't?
  • IRS wasn't implemented to save space... it was implemented because the previous BOSS 302 literally maxed out the envelope for solid rear axles performance. IRS in the new one (although it doesn't appear to be all that compact) rides like a dream and is on its way to making it a true contender against its rivals. Finally, a Mustang to be proud of.

    Also to the Edmunds guys, I would love to see the GT350R suspension if you can get your hands on one please!
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