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Real World Numbers - 2015 Hyundai Sonata Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 9,975
edited July 2015 in Hyundai
imageReal World Numbers - 2015 Hyundai Sonata Long-Term Road Test

Our expectations for good fuel economy in the long-term 2015 Hyundai Sonata are realized with careful driving and a road trip.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • Over estimated fuel economy ratings seem to be the order of the day with most manufacturers these days.
  • Over estimated fuel economy ratings seem to be the order of the day with most manufacturers these days.

    They have tried to make the tests more 'real world' but it still isn't quite there: https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/fe_test_schedules.shtml
    with their high speed test topping out at 80 mph and averaging 48 mph it isn't quite Southern California real world. When it is actually moving the traffic often flows at 75 and requires full throttle bursts to change lanes or pass other cars.
    The highway test itself tops out at 60 mph. I'm guessing if they cruised along at 60 in the Sonata it would do quite well. MPG drops off pretty quickly as you go over that speed.

  • EPA test is not close to real world. Real world city you sit in traffic barely moving or going light to light. Then using heavy throttle inputs to make it across intersections or make left turns. On the highway most people cruise close to 80 mph not 60. They should top out at 90 or 100 and set their cruise speed at 75. Not a legal speed in most states but more accurate.
  • cmhj2000cmhj2000 Se, Pa.Posts: 381
    edited July 2015
    With 7 vehicles since 1995, not once have I had a problem meeting or beat EPA estimates when I have good gas, less than 10% corn squeezings.
  • cmhj2000 said:

    With 7 vehicles since 1995, not once have I had a problem meeting or beat EPA estimates when I have good gas, less than 10% corn squeezings.

    I think with reviews like these the issue often is a combination of it not being their car and (possibly) not their gas money. Plus add to that the good chance that they just drove a car with much more power and they will be pushing this car even more.
    I dropped about 4 miles per gallon in my personal car after renting a car with a big V8 in it. I had just gotten used to moving fast on demand so without even thinking about it I was asking my fuel efficient car to do the same. Once I forced myself to adjust back to more mellow driving and to pay attention to the mpg estimate on the dash I was back up to beating the EPA estimates.
  • 1997montez341997montez34 NJ, USAPosts: 202
    In fairness the EPA highway estimate is 35, not 37 for this car.
  • greg128greg128 Posts: 418
    edited July 2015
    On a 1000 mile trip lets say for vacation, the difference between average MPG of 30 or 25 amounts to $20 at $3 per gallon of gas. That's barely the cost of a meal. That computes to 2 cents per mile compared to the average cost of 61 cents per mile for the average vehicle (according to AAA). If the average MPG was only 20 that computes to 5 cents a mile., or $50 on a 1000 mile trip or approximately an 8% increase in the cost of operating it compared to a vehicle that gets 30 MPG on average. That 20 MPG car would cost on average $600 a year more for gas, and the 25 MG vehicle would cost about $240 per year more. With the annual cost of vehicle use ranging from $8000 for an entry level up to $15000 or more for a Luxury car
    the difference is negligible.

    I say drive what you like and don't pay so much attention to MPG.
  • I blame the edmunds staff. Not a Hyundai fan by any stretch, but these guys hardly ever TRY to get good fuel economy. They just drive however they want and then cross their fingers hoping they'll get close. Want to actually get close to the so called "EPA" ratings, then set the cruise at a normal speed like 65. To assume that most drivers set their cruise at 80 just isn't true. I always set mine at 65, because I actually care to get good gas mileage. I average about 37-38mpg in my RSX, and that's only "rated" at about 31.
  • fordson1fordson1 Posts: 1,512
    greg128 said:

    On a 1000 mile trip lets say for vacation, the difference between average MPG of 30 or 25 amounts to $20 at $3 per gallon of gas. That's barely the cost of a meal. That computes to 2 cents per mile compared to the average cost of 61 cents per mile for the average vehicle (according to AAA). If the average MPG was only 20 that computes to 5 cents a mile., or $50 on a 1000 mile trip or approximately an 8% increase in the cost of operating it compared to a vehicle that gets 30 MPG on average. That 20 MPG car would cost on average $600 a year more for gas, and the 25 MG vehicle would cost about $240 per year more. With the annual cost of vehicle use ranging from $8000 for an entry level up to $15000 or more for a Luxury car
    the difference is negligible.

    I say drive what you like and don't pay so much attention to MPG.

    I kind of agree with you, except that 12,000 miles per year is not considered average...more like 15,000 to 18,000.
  • gslippygslippy Posts: 513
    I don't want to hear about missing the EPA numbers when you set the cruise to 72, and also drive through mountains.

    The EPA highway cycle has an average speed of 48 mph, but I can meet or exceed it if I drive the speed limit.
  • dfrissdfriss Posts: 23
    We have found the Sonata our sensitive to speed, and it seems to get best mileage below 70. That's pretty boring. It also seems sensitive to the quality (or something) of the fuel. Where we seem to go from 33 to 36 MPG (tank avg as shown on computer) on the same highway and speed after random fill ups. Only once has it shown 38 MPG for a trip, a short one, and under 70. And on the highway we usually run 'eco' mode.
  • gslippygslippy Posts: 513
    Eco mode merely damps the acceleration profile; it doesn't magically gain you any MPG during steady-state travel on the highway.
  • gslippygslippy Posts: 513
    Below 70 is 'boring'? Maybe so, but don't complain about fuel economy then. There is nothing in the EPA test protocol that includes 70 mph. This may surprise you, but all cars get their best fuel economy below 70 - ALL. It's a matter of physics. They also get better fuel economy below 60, and even 50.
  • trvtrv Posts: 3
    Not all cars get better gas mileage below 70. I have a Ford Explorer that won't event stay in high gear that slow. I have a Chrysler 300M that gets 30 MPG at higher speeds and about 24 MPG at 70.
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