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11 Best Used Cars for College Students | Edmunds.com

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited August 2015 in General
image11 Best Used Cars for College Students | Edmunds.com

Edmunds.com identifies 11 used cars and SUVs that would meet the needs of college students especially well. We looked for vehicles that are inexpensive to buy and maintain, reliable, spacious, stylish and equipped with smartphone-friendly features.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • I half agree with your criteria for college student cars. Thinking back to my own experience owning a car in college, and considering what cars my classmates had (those who owned cars, anyway), the key issues were:

    1. Low purchase cost. Students don't have a lot of dough.
    2. Very reliable/low maintenance cost. See above.
    3. Versatile enough to pack in a full dorm room. Hatchbacks rule!

    Things students did NOT care about in my experience were safety, tech features, and stylishness. These are all nice-to-haves that fall by the wayside quickly when it's a choice between car or no car.
  • socal_ericsocal_eric SoCalPosts: 189
    If the parents are buying and footing the running costs it won't be as much of a concern, but insurance and economy, not just fuel alone but overall cost per mile would be good factors to consider. For example, something like a cheap Scion tC or a V6 Mustang might sound cooler than a boring economy sedan, but if it costs a ton more to insurance, a self-supporting college student on their own budget might want to take that into consideration before buying and getting a surprise.
  • inteli7inteli7 Posts: 1
    tsx has known transmission issues.....so beware
  • Priuses are a bargain right now, due to very low fuel prices, and if gas prices go back up, you'll be glad you have a car that gets 50 mpg.
  • bobwebgbobwebg Posts: 1
    Each student and situation are different. What works for one may not work for another. But I recommend a safety and economy mindset. Your young and you will make mistakes in judgement so you need good crash protection. That means a bigger standard sedan model that weighs at least 3500 pounds or so. Instead of a car that attracts attention, I recommend a plain jane sedan that won't attract law enforcement profiling, has lower insurance costs, and that you don't have to worry about the scrapes and bumps with. Let your friends laugh if they have to since your concentrating on getting to school and earning a degree. Buy your "dream car" when you've got a good job after graduation. Get a used car that has been owned and maintained well by one previous owner for many years. My granddaughter drives a 2004 Mercury Grand Marquis and she is smart enough to appreciate its safety and transport advantages. However a young male college student may insist on a "mustang" performance car image to appeal to his female woman friends. Your mileage may vary!
  • I had some Taiwanese friends who asked my advice on getting their college student a car. We established a few things like the fact he, the college student would keep the car long after college. Many of my Asian friends buy like that. They buy a good car and keep it for a long time. After a few bumps they got him an Impreza for many of the reasons listed in this article. He is going to engineering school in Colorado. With the weather, possibility of outdoor activities and taking fellow students places it was a perfect choice. They are very safe, well equipped, capable and versatile for many uses.

    The other thing I recommended was driving lessons which they did. He was a terrible driver, haha! Sometimes, the stereotypes are true! Good driving is better than more airbags. They just don't drive in Taiwan.
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