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07 Honda Accord with high miles

madein82madein82 Does it really matterPosts: 1
edited September 2015 in Honda
I'm in need of another vehicle and I was looking online at this 07 Honda Accord but it has almost 162,000 miles on it. Is that too many miles being that it's an 07 and if so then I was also looking at this 08 Dodge Avenger & it has almost 115,000 miles on it. Just trying to get some honest opinions on the matter because I don't have perfect credit so it's not like I can go to a new car dealer and brand new one so for now I have to buy used cars. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance! 

Best Answer

  • 93tracker5spd93tracker5spd North East Ohio USAPosts: 194
    Accepted Answer
    Hello! Welcome to Edmunds. You ask a very controversial Question. First I certainly can't recommend buying any vehicle that I have not seen personally and went over the past service records, but by the same token I would never tell someone not to buy a car that they like and want, it is your money, and you will have live with your decision. However; there are some factors to look at. You say you want an honest opinion, I will give you one. Put aside your personal likes and dislikes for the vehicle, and look at it as an investment, a machine that you will depend on for a while to provide transportation. I looked up the standard value for a 2007 Honda Accord with AC, power steering, power brakes, and power windows and door looks. Since you didn't say what options were on the car you are looking at, this is basic value for a basic 4Door sedan with minor cosmetic defects which do not effect operation, at 162,000 miles. Kelly lists it at about $4,000.00. Hondas in general have a very good reputation even with high miles, that doesn't mean that there aren't any bad ones or lemons out there, it simply sets the odds of getting a bad one lower than with some other makes.

    Now to look at some cold hard facts: What do you know about this vehicle and the miles it has been driven? Did it belong to a professional who used it for business, and was inclined to care for it well because he or she required dependability, or did it belong to a family with older teens who gave it many miles by many different drivers who's only concern was that it either make it home or that there was someone to call for a ride?

    Are the service records intact and complete, do they show regular factory recommended service, done at regular mileage intervals?

    What state was this car from, and in what condition are their roads? Is it from a state that uses a lot of salt on their roads?

    Is this car held by a Honda dealer, or by a private independent used car lot? Is the holder willing to provide a 30 day money back guarantee if you should find something more wrong than what is obvious upon initial inspection? Will they provide any kind of high mileage drive train warranty?

    Finally; never ever buy anything site un-seen! Before buying any vehicle be sure to inspect it carefully for yourself, or if you prefer, take your favourite mechanic along.

    Be sure to look under the car, in the trunk if it has one, open all doors and look for rust, bad hinges, locks that don't work, windows that don't go up and down smoothly and listen to the engine for unexpected noises. DRIVE the car: I don't mean around the block, tell the sales person you want to go on an express way with the vehicle, and don't take no for an answer. Once their put it through its paces. Get it up to highway speed, don't be taken in by the new car smell, that comes in a bottle from anywhere that sales air freshener. Accelerate hard from the ramp to highway speed, feel the handling and response, listen for rattles from outside, engine, tranny, drive line, notice vibrations such as tires, shocks, struts, etc.

    Remember this sales person may speak to you nicely, but his or her main concern is to move vehicles, it's what they do for a living. So be cordial, but firm, make them know that this is your money you are spending and that you must be satisfied with the vehicle before talking business.

    If the car seems sound, but may need tires, or shocks or exhaust work, make the dealer agree to fix it to your satisfaction before signing anything. And last of all, your most powerful tool is knowledge.

    Once you decide to go and see a car for yourself, make sure to do your homework, take notes with you, print the blue book value of the car and take it along, you will always pay a little more to a dealer than a private owner, but remember the dealer is in business, and can provide repairs and service before purchase, a private owner won't do that. I see I have written a small book here, but you did ask for an honest opinion. I wish you the best of luck with your purchase.
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