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New Shoes and an Oil Change - 2007 Dodge Charger SRT8 Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,112
edited October 2015 in Dodge
imageNew Shoes and an Oil Change - 2007 Dodge Charger SRT8 Long-Term Road Test

The parking brake went out on our 2007 Dodge Charger SRT8, so we had the dealer take a look. Since it was there and almost time, we also had them change the oil.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisPosts: 509
    I'm sorry but I have a gripe here- show me a Millennial who would voluntarily drive a vehicle with $110 oil changes and I'll show you a spoiled brat with Daddy's credit card.
  • rm2008rm2008 Posts: 31
    ebeaudoin said:

    I'm sorry but I have a gripe here- show me a Millennial who would voluntarily drive a vehicle with $110 oil changes and I'll show you a spoiled brat with Daddy's credit card.

    Ebaudoin, this car is a hypothetical scenario of what it would be like to drive an SRT8. Here's a quote from the introduction:

    "If we were emulating those millennial car buyers, the V6 would be the clear winner, since 75 percent of Chargers registered by millennials had that engine. But we felt we had a chance to take things in a different and interesting direction."

    -Ron Montoya, Senior Consumer Advice Editor.
  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisPosts: 509
    Thanks for clarifying Ron. Must have missed that in the intro. My apologies!
  • 5vzfe5vzfe Posts: 161
    Perhaps it would've been cheaper if they used a Dodge reminder sticker instead of an Infiniti one.
  • nate001nate001 Posts: 102
    edited October 2015
    Did someone drive around with the parking brake on? Is that the price of having a V8, there is so much power that you don't notice when the parking brake is on?
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    I'm actually curious about the "Parking brake needed new shoes." Most parking brakes just have a cable that pull the calibers or Drum's shoes in on the rear tires. So if the brakes are getting worn, you just need to adjust the cable on the parking brake. So I'm guessing this article is saying they serviced the rear brakes but not the front brakes on the car?
  • I'm actually curious about the "Parking brake needed new shoes." Most parking brakes just have a cable that pull the calibers or Drum's shoes in on the rear tires. So if the brakes are getting worn, you just need to adjust the cable on the parking brake. So I'm guessing this article is saying they serviced the rear brakes but not the front brakes on the car?

    What he said. How does it have shoes and pads on the rear disc brakes?
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 14,570
    With rear discs, the parking brake is on the inside of the rotor. Think of it as a small drum brake inside the back side of the rotor.
    2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1, 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501

    With rear discs, the parking brake is on the inside of the rotor. Think of it as a small drum brake inside the back side of the rotor.

    So you're saying that there's a separate brake pad going to the rotor on the parking brake on the SRT Charger? Sounds over-complicated. Every other vehicle, you break out a crescent wrench and tighten up the slack until you replace the brake pads on all four corners, then loosen the Parking brake a little to put it back "right."
  • s197gts197gt Posts: 486
    edited October 2015
    it is not uncommon to have parking brake shoes that press on the inside of the rotor when engaged. having said that... not sure why they would wear down unless someone WAS driving with the parking brake on.

    edmunds has done brake jobs before. as i recall they swapped the pads on their 370z. i say front brake job with aftermarket performance parts!


    So you're saying that there's a separate brake pad going to the rotor on the parking brake on the SRT Charger? Sounds over-complicated. Every other vehicle, you break out a crescent wrench and tighten up the slack until you replace the brake pads on all four corners, then loosen the Parking brake a little to put it back "right."

  • nate001nate001 Posts: 102
    What would Stokes Tire cost for the brake job. A millennial would a least get a quote and would probably use a independent shop if there was a good one in the area.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 14,570
    @daryleason,
    A lot of vehicles have rear disk brakes that have a parking brake built into the back side of the rotor.
    2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1, 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • 7driver7driver Posts: 145
    edited October 2015
    Agree that someone's been driving with the parking brake engaged. Brake pads/shoes only wear when they convert kinetic energy to entropy. No energy transfer = no wear. One other possibility is that the shoes got hard over time but that doesn't sound like that's the case here.
  • schen72schen72 Posts: 433
    edited October 2015
    I didn't know "millennials" are so frugal. I had always assumed that they didn't carefully watch their money.
  • What happens with these shoes over time is they deteriorate. I had an intrepid and a 300m that both had this same design.
  • ebeaudoin said:

    I'm sorry but I have a gripe here- show me a Millennial who would voluntarily drive a vehicle with $110 oil changes and I'll show you a spoiled brat with Daddy's credit card.

    ebeaudoin said:

    I'm sorry but I have a gripe here- show me a Millennial who would voluntarily drive a vehicle with $110 oil changes and I'll show you a spoiled brat with Daddy's credit card.

    My SLK 230 cost about $110 for an old change... it stung, but it was only every 10k miles, which made it somewhat better.
  • csubowtiecsubowtie Posts: 143
    I'm 32, so maybe not Millenial, but close enough. I have spending about $100 per oil change for years now. That's pretty much the going rate for synthetic oil changes. I also have spaced out my oil changes to every 5000 miles vs. the 3000 recommended they recommended back in 2007 for regular oil. I'm not sure on my current car, but I did find on my S-10 that when I switched to synthetic I gained 1 mpg. I got a killer deal on a reg oil change once, so I did that and lost that mpg. I gained it right back again when I went back to synthetic. So paying a little extra for extended intervals, better performance, and the comfort of better protecting my engine, yeah, I'll pay that, and consider it money well spent.
  • socal_ericsocal_eric SoCalPosts: 189
    For reading, the type of parking brake the Charger and many cars with rear disc brakes use is called drum-in-disc (or as Chrysler and many OEM suppliers call them, drum-in-hat). As mentioned this setup uses small brake shoes and the hat of the rotor as a small drum brake. These are only designed to keep the car from moving when parked and it doesn't take much to wear them out if there's a cable, mechanical or operator error keeping them from disengaging. Normally they won't require servicing over the life of the car.

    The other type of parking brake setup on rear disc brake-equipped vehicles does use the regular service brake (calipers) to hold the vehicle in place. This may seem less complicated when looking at the overall number of different parts but it requires the caliper itself to be more complex. On the back side of the caliper's piston (that pushes the brake pad against the rotor) you need a linkage and arm to push against that piston. Because this goes into the caliper's body there's a greater potential for hydraulic brake fluid to leak out since it requires another seal. Early designs commonly had issues with dirty fluid that had absorbed moisture corroding metal and causing the parking assembly to bind or freeze.

    There's some other small differences why an automaker might use one or the other, such as the drum-in-hat setup protecting the parking shoes and components behind a dust shield and away from the elements. This reduces the chance the service (regular) brake pad will freeze against the rotor and make a popping noise when driving off in sub-zero temps. Nowadays both setups have been perfected enough where it often comes down to the supplier being used and occasionally packaging and cable routing.
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