Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Did you get a great deal? Let us know in the Values & Prices Paid section!
Meet your fellow owners in our Owners Clubs

Ranger / Mazda 2.3 Liter Imrc Check Engine Code Work Around

xfixerofcarsxfixerofcars Posts: 1
edited October 2015 in Mazda
2.3 liter Mazda Ranger IMRC codes: repair replace solution

I have a segway suggestion for anyone who has a 2.3 liter 4 cyl engine. Mine is a 2002
I went to inspection and I failed with two codes 1537 and one other both were related to the Intake Manifold Runner Control System. One indicated the IMRC control vacuum control was bad. I replaced it BOUGHT IT FROM EBAY FOR 20.00. That eliminated the one code, however I still had the other code. Frustrated in order to service the engine for the other code I had to remove the intake manifold to access the "Actuator" or SCV swirl control valve which is buried between the firewall and the intake manifold with the screws holding it impossible to access while the manifold is installed. While researching a possible cure I saw a video on You Tube where the mechanic after removing the manifold a real nasty job by the way then removed the swirl flaps which are supposed to add turbulence to the air flow at low speeds for better low end torque. (which is BS) That video instructed me to remove those flaps and to seal the rod ports which run between the cylinders thus allowing the manifold to feed air independently to each cylinder without any cross bleeding of the intake air. To begin have a shot of Grand Marnier, pray for a few minutes to your deity of choice and then remove the intake manifold. Once that is completed, to remove the rod first remove the SCV then the little pivot actuator from the end of the rod and save them. Next, spray with generously penetrating lubricant on the flapper rod. Then position the plastic manifold in such a way that it will remain firmly positioned and secure while performing the next step. Take a pair of side cutters or Vice grips and grasp the rod, then gently tap the pliers with a small tap hammer. Do not attempt to hold the rod and tap on the plastic manifold it is too brittle to sustain this type of impact and will crack. Also don’t attempt to pivot the rod with the pliers using the plastic manifold housing as a fulcrum. Slowly but surely tap, re-spray and as I did then tap the rod in and out gently to free up any crud resistance until the rod is removed. Keep in mind the rod is square and there are several, I found two metal bushing guides and inserts, there might have been three DUH !! between the intake ports that independently seal the chambers. The will fall out after you remove the rod, flaps and the corresponding holders. I threw the flaps and the rod away. The little port cap inserts which are split and can be easily removed when gently collapsed will allow you to slide them out they are all the same. Next clean any oil residue from the interior of the intake manifold plastic (if your anal retentive clean the exterior also !!) seal the rod ports I used an epoxy to do this and then slide the port guides back into the holes. There is no need to glue the port guides they are held by the intake manifold and the engine head firmly in place. Now since the swirl rockers have been removed the SCV serves no real purpose accept to B MY B warranting another manifold removal to repair or replace it. So I left it unattached to the intake manifold. This would allow me to service it without removing the manifold. Now it will be necessary complete another step prior to installing the manifold. 1 is to cut the bottom section from the SCV the flat portion with the screw hole. Replace the Actuator Rod Lever and place the severed actuator pivot back over the hole and then secure it in place with one screw, the piece you removed from the SCV. This will provide an air tight seal which you need to ensure air flow and vacuum stability. Next I reinstalled the manifold cleared the code and wallah it returned. Thinking to myself those sneaky SOB's I bet if you disconnect the SCV it will send a Code to the computer indicating it is defective or disconnected... RIGHT ON.... So now I drilled a hole in the snap on ball portion of the SCV which had been connected to the pivot, the size of the thickness of a "coat hanger" that's right guys and girls a coat hanger :) I am getting real creative here. Cut about a 6" long piece of coat hanger and utilizing the hole already drilled in the snap ball end do the following; Make a 7 shape or right angle bend at one end of the coat hanger and put it threw the mounting screw hole. Then I collapsed (working against the spring load of the SCV) the rod about 1/6" of an inch shortening its stroke allowed me to fool the sensor into believing it is attached to the manifold. Now I bent the other end at the appropriate point pushed it through the opposing hole and collapsed both ends to about 240 degrees of bend so it would not fall out. Keeping in mind, at 3000 RPM or higher the actuator will still be performing its normal operation and attempting to pull open the flaps which are no longer present. I reconnected the electrical connector and the vacuum line from the IMRC solenoid, cleared the code and wallah breezed through inspection Also my vehicle actually runs smother, better and my gas mileage has improved slightly. The single benefit of all this is that if the SCV ever becomes defective I can easily replace it in about 3 minutes....... alleviating the necessity of removing the intake manifold...... If you would like a picture sent to you depicting the coat hangered SCV assembly send an email to [Email removed]
put something like coat hanger !!!!! in the subject line.
I really really hope this helps someone out there solve a problem or two.
Oh! I cant wait to see the feedback I get on this one !! :)

Sign In or Register to comment.