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25,000-Mile Update - 2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,125
edited October 2015 in Ford
image25,000-Mile Update - 2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test

Our 2015 Ford F-150 doesn't sit idle very often. We've covered 25,000 miles in 10 months already, with no issues to report.

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Comments

  • thepuffthepuff Posts: 87
    "so reliable and durable...." Are you sure this is a Ford and not a rebadged Toyota...according to Consumer Reports today (and always) these American cars are all super-unreliable. Goes to show what a true test will prove over a bunch of consumer-biased evaluations. Also, since when does not knowing how to program bluetooth or use a navigation system have anything to do with reliability..this one subject making up most of Consumer Report's ratings nowadays.

    Again, I would look closely at the brand badge because I can't believe tis isn't a Toyota....sort of like our 2015 Toyota Corolla that was given to us as a rental this week while our rear-ended Ford Explorer is getting fixed. In one week this "hallmark of reliability" has had intermittent starting problems, air leaks through the passenger door handle into the cabin, the trunk takes two slams to shut, and a check engine light came on today when my wife accidentally shifted into neutral (from drive to neutral and back) while driving home. Oh, and that new engine sounds like a hummingbird passing gas. Do people really buy this things!?!?
  • I sure would like to see this truck's stay be extended for at least another 35,000 miles. The combination of a big vehicle with a tiny, boosted engine seems to be a recipe for long term troubles. Not that I'm knocking 25,000 relatively trouble free miles, but I think a lot of us are interested in what happens once these engines get outside of warranty coverage (whatever that may be...I'm assuming that 60k miles gets you through the warranty and into the unknown.
  • I would like to see it stay longer...as long as the Ram. I would also like to see if there are any effects from the huge crankcase overfill that may crop up.
  • thepuff said:

    "so reliable and durable...." Are you sure this is a Ford and not a rebadged Toyota...according to Consumer Reports today (and always) these American cars are all super-unreliable. Goes to show what a true test will prove over a bunch of consumer-biased evaluations. Also, since when does not knowing how to program bluetooth or use a navigation system have anything to do with reliability..this one subject making up most of Consumer Report's ratings nowadays.

    Again, I would look closely at the brand badge because I can't believe tis isn't a Toyota....sort of like our 2015 Toyota Corolla that was given to us as a rental this week while our rear-ended Ford Explorer is getting fixed. In one week this "hallmark of reliability" has had intermittent starting problems, air leaks through the passenger door handle into the cabin, the trunk takes two slams to shut, and a check engine light came on today when my wife accidentally shifted into neutral (from drive to neutral and back) while driving home. Oh, and that new engine sounds like a hummingbird passing gas. Do people really buy this things!?!?

    That's funny, a co-worker of mine had a 20k Camry rental go into "limp mode" not that long ago. In terms of reliability, though, keep in mind that this is only 25k miles. You really don't expect to have major problems so early. As to whether American manufacturers are more reliable than Japanese based brands? No. Not according to the Consumer Reports data which is still the best housing of unbiased evenly-received survey data. The EcoRam has certainly shown to have some VERY serious problems which would scare me from ever buying that car and you can't say that countless people haven't had problems with newer Fords and their Ecoboost engines. I looked at Mustangs and Focuses not so long ago and there were some pretty scary stories out there, "limp mode" included as a major one too.
  • bankerdannybankerdanny Posts: 1,021
    handbrake said:

    I sure would like to see this truck's stay be extended for at least another 35,000 miles. The combination of a big vehicle with a tiny, boosted engine seems to be a recipe for long term troubles. Not that I'm knocking 25,000 relatively trouble free miles, but I think a lot of us are interested in what happens once these engines get outside of warranty coverage (whatever that may be...I'm assuming that 60k miles gets you through the warranty and into the unknown.

    Relatively trouble free? Seems like they are saying absolutely trouble free.
  • The engine in this truck unexpectedly showed how durable it is not long ago. Remember that it was driven for 10,000 miles with 1 gallon too much oil in it. They didn't notice any change in operation or performance and not one leak. Although it could explain the dismal fuel economy. The 3.5 EB has also proven to be durable and reliable save for a few sporadic problems with broken timing chain guides.
  • One can go to any discussion regarding the new Ecoboost 2.7 in an F150 that starts at only 4168 lbs in base curb weight, and there are folks on them who act as if this is just another base model V6 in a truck. This is not. This is not the standard V6 like the base model 3.7 that gets torque in the RPM stratosphere, and even there is now where near the peak torque of this engine. If one will slow down before commenting and look a the torque curve and power curve on this engine, one will see that it can and will behave much like a mid-sized V8.

    I've got a 2015 Reg. Cab, 2wd, short bed, with the 2.7 Ecoboost, with only a 25 pound, soft-top tonneau, so I've got a truck with an empty weight of less than 4200 pounds. I can tool around in that truck and even accelerate at an acceptable clip with just barely touching the accelerator and staying under 2000 RPM most of the time, which is much like the previous Ford 4.6 V8 or a small diesel like the Ecodiesel, except that an F150, unlike a Ram, can be had for much, much less than $38K, as is mandated when opting for a Ram diesel; In fact, as an owner of an F150 with that previous 4.6 V8, the Ecoboost torque comes just a little lower than the gas V8. So everyone who hasn't thought this out, please think through what you're saying. If a pickup powered by an engine (any sized engine)can be easily propelled by that engine staying in a low RPM status while doing it's job, it is not being overly stressed; will not prematurely wear out, as compared to a comparably-powered V8; but can achieve better mpg when used and driven that way most of the time if it is smaller displacement and is not sucking in gobs of fuel, which is the case in this truck, with this engine, when it's being conservatively-driven in a light version configuration. My average mpg so far is 23.

    Now it is possible that there is something in Ford's design that will make it a bad engine, but if that does come out to be true, it will not be the concept of adding low-end torque and better possible mpg through direct injection and turbo charging.
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