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Ignition fuse

dsaxmandsaxman Posts: 1
edited October 2015 in Ford
I have a 2009 escape that keeps blowing ignition fuse will blow multiple times in a row then take to shop and it runs fine for a few weeks then does it again can't figure out

Comments

  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,116
    It's unlikely anyone can help without actually testing and proving what is going on. There are legitimate routines that top techs around the country use to diagnose these kinds of issues.

    First you need to be more specific about which fuse is blowing. Give me the fuse block location that the fuse is in and the fuse number and its amperage rating. Then do you have the 3.0l or the 2.5l? What transmission does your car have? That would let me know what schematic to base this routine on. From there what we would do is...

    Pull the fuse that is failing and install a tool that would allow a circuit breaker to be installed remotely from the fuse box. A low amps current probe would then be attached to the wire between the circuit breaker and the fuse block. The low amps current probe will put out a voltage in relationship to the current flowing in the circuit allowing the tech to monitor the flowing in the current on a laptop based digital oscilloscope. A second or even third current probe could be attached to the vehicles wiring harness at strategic locations which would help divide the circuit into pieces. Then road test the car and try to catch the circuit displaying any random current spikes. With problems like this when a fuse randomly blows the failure may actually occur quite frequently but not last long enough to cause a fuse to fail. The current probe however will measure the current spikes and send that information to the scope. Then depending on just what the tech is seeing the next test point can be chosen and the routine repeated until the exact location of the fault is proven.

    Find a technician that specializes in electronics and diagnostics, and you will fond one that uses this routine and he/she will make easy work of locating and repairing this problem.
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