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2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test | Edmunds.com

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited December 2015 in Ford


Our 2015 Ford Mustang GT wins the award for the most awkwardly placed dipstick of this model year. There it is on the right, tucked down beneath the strut tower brace. The dipstick pulls out about 3 inches before it must be bent significantly to circumvent its neighbors.

Read the full story here

Comments

  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    Cars always end up comprising somewhere on something. I'd be willing to bet that the designers figured that most people aren't going to check their oil themselves, they'll just let the service shop change the oil. By the time the car starts developing oil loss issues, it'll be out of warranty anyways.

    Does the car have an oil monitoring system, either for oil change duration or oil level? I know they're not particularly accurate for the level sensors, but I could see the vast majority of car owners utilizing that way more often than actually popping the hood and checking the fluids. It's a sign of the changing of the times. I'm not that old (37) but I've actually met "adults" that had no clue how to check their own fluids or change a tire. And I know it's sexist, but it surprises me more when it's a guy than when it's a girl.
  • Get rid of the stupid sound tube, and it becomes much easier to get to. That's what I did on my '12 GT
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    lewis26 said:

    Get rid of the stupid sound tube, and it becomes much easier to get to. That's what I did on my '12 GT

    Is that what that thing is to side of the dipstick? I was wondering about it.
  • Does the car have an oil monitoring system, either for oil change duration or oil level?

    Yep, all Fords have had it for years now. Just for oil duration though, not level. Want to start a flame war on a Mustang forum? Claim that the OLM (oil life monitor) works correctly and that you don't need to change your oil ever 5K regardless of what it says.

    This dipstick is not that big a deal. Check the oil 5 times and you'll have it down pat. No issue on my '11 GT w/ a STB.
  • subatomicsubatomic Posts: 140
    edited December 2015
    A vexing detail on what is otherwise a very nice sports car. I check the oil level on the dipsticks once every few weeks for my daily driver and my weekend weapon. Between oil changes, I like to keep the oil reservoir topped off with my favorite premium grade synthetic for smooth running. It’s good practice to monitor relatively simple things such as oil level on the dipstick (assuming the car has one) and tire pressure between scheduled maintenance appointments. BTW - I hope the issue with the paint on the trunk lid was addressed.
  • Well, I guess since it is only on the GTs with the Performance pack, it's not a huge issue for most.
  • Same dipstick location and length is used on V8 F-150s, so you need a ladder ,or to climb up on the bumper and lay down on the radiator and engine cover to reach it, plus a light to be able to find the tube again even in a brightly lighted station. Your clothes will not be staying clean unless you just exited a car wash. On 2010 F-150 with the 3V 5.4 the dipstick was high and forward, so I could check it with my feet flat on the ground, Yes the 5.0 has more peak power and burns 5% less fuel, but this is one way that the newer truck is not better. It just doesn't seem like the cost savings can justify decisions which irritate customers.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    @colorado kid:
    I'm right at 6', depending on what 7-11 I'm in. Luckily, I've got long arms, so I've not had an issue, so long as I reach from the Driver's Side with my 2013 F-150. I haven't got a 2015, so I can't say if there's a difference.

    You know, it's amazing when you consider that the 5.0 Coyote with it's 360 HP (at least on my 2013) has greater horsepower rating than the 5.4 Liter V8 from just a few years ago.
  • nagantnagant Posts: 176
    subatomic said:

    A vexing detail on what is otherwise a very nice sports car. I check the oil level on the dipsticks once every few weeks for my daily driver and my weekend weapon. Between oil changes, I like to keep the oil reservoir topped off with my favorite premium grade synthetic for smooth running. It’s good practice to monitor relatively simple things such as oil level on the dipstick (assuming the car has one) and tire pressure between scheduled maintenance appointments. BTW - I hope the issue with the paint on the trunk lid was addressed.


    How many miles do you put on your car every few weeks? Also keeping your oil topped off has nothing to do with "smoother running". There is no reason to add oil unless it needs a half a quart or so. Our cars do not leak oil so I check them every few thousand miles. I just had the oil changed today in my wifes 2007 PT Cruiser 2.4Turbo (72K miles). I changed at 7500 miles (just a bit over a year) and it had used 1/2qt of Mobil 1 in that time (and had just turned a bit brown). I noticed it being 1/2 qt low about a month ago but I knew I was going to change it soon so there was no reason to add any. $26 for the 5qt jug of Mobil 1 with a Mopar filter for $8 at Wal Mart and I took it to the shop I have been going to for years and they changed it for $15 for a bit over $50 for full synthetic and factory filter change. Its a great shop but of course they put the sticker on the windshield that says "Change oil every 3000/5000 miles reg/synthetic oil".
  • subatomicsubatomic Posts: 140
    edited December 2015
    @nagant,
    You misquoted my original post. I did not state that keeping the oil topped off results in "smoother running". I stated that using a premium synthetic oil results in smooth running (better lubrication, cleaning and protection). I have also noticed that higher quality synthetic motor oils resist break down/deterioration better than conventional motor oils. As a result, the oil level does not fall as quickly. I put between 150 and 200 miles per week on my DD for commuting to work. I can put an additional 400 miles on it on any given weekend, if I choose to see my parents who live in another state, which I do periodically. I have two older cars, an economy car (DD) and a well preserved sports coupe (weekend car) with a reputation for consuming oil between recommended maintenance intervals . I know from experience, it is easy to overlook and forget about the oil level in your car and risk it getting too low. On one occasion, it got dangerously low (the sports coupe) in between the recommended maintenance intervals. After this experience, I learned to check my oil level periodically, top it off if needed, and have the peace of mind. I still maintain that this is good practice, but you are free to do whatever you choose.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    The bad thing about having to bend or flex a dipstick is when you know it's sliding along the tube on the inside. This is more of a problem with the long, rear placement dipsticks. The short, front mounted ones aren't bad at all. But I hate anything that can throw off a reading, such as picking up oil at the bottom of the dipstick tube from the side of the tube on its way out.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    Anyone else have a post that you went to type and it said "your post will appear once it's approved"?
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,555
    Try checking the oil on your BMW.
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501

    Try checking the oil on your BMW.

    I bet it's really hard to reach on the BMW i3! I heard the Tesla Model S is the worse though. You have to just about take the car apart to get to it.
  • Done with Edmunds and their ban on ad blockers. Don't mind some ads but there are so many here it slows down the computer.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    This is sort of off-topic, but I got to thinking about something on people when it comes to cars. We really only know the vehicles that we've spent time with. Maybe some of the information we have transfers to a vehicle that uses the same platform, engine, etc. So if you're familiar with say a mid-90s Crown Victoria, then you can speak without issue on a mid-90s Mercury Grand Marquis. You'd still probably be okay talking about a Lincoln Town Car from that era, because they used the same platform, engine, etc. The further afield you go, the less that you can be CERTAIN about what you're talking about, but you're probably okay for the most part.

    Which leads to my main point. Just think if the only experience you have is with bad cars. You're cruising around in your car, perfectly content with it, think it's great, but you don't understand just how horribly this car is compared to just about everything else. What everyone else derides, you consider THE ride. It'd be like not knowing that you can get beef in any other form than either ground chuck or MAYBE Lean. The guy that's had a chance to sample Sirloin isn't happy with Ground Chuck. He'll eat it if he has too, but only till he can afford the Sirloin.

    So when we get to a point of a car that there is an article devoted to the dipstick (which I'm not disputing can be irritating), think how far we've come with vehicles.

    I've had some great cars. I've had some horrible cars. Okay, one horrible car, the 2006 PT Loser that my wife talked me into. I've had some middling cars that weren't bad, but weren't exceptional. I've had vehicles that were perfectly suited for what I needed from them, I've had others that I forced to fit a role they weren't designed for. But if all I knew was my WORST car, the PT Cruiser, to me, it'd be normal and not that bad.

    Imagine if someone from the 60s took a modern car out for a drive without the passage of time, where they could see the advancements progress. They'd be blown away by a freaking Civic or Focus on the speed, acceleration, and handling. And the tech gadgets would confuse the snot out them.

    Just a thought.
  • nagantnagant Posts: 176
    subatomic said:

    @nagant,
    You misquoted my original post. I did not state that keeping the oil topped off results in "smoother running". I stated that using a premium synthetic oil results in smooth running (better lubrication, cleaning and protection). I have also noticed that higher quality synthetic motor oils resist break down/deterioration better than conventional motor oils. As a result, the oil level does not fall as quickly. I put between 150 and 200 miles per week on my DD for commuting to work. I can put an additional 400 miles on it on any given weekend, if I choose to see my parents who live in another state, which I do periodically. I have two older cars, an economy car (DD) and a well preserved sports coupe (weekend car) with a reputation for consuming oil between recommended maintenance intervals . I know from experience, it is easy to overlook and forget about the oil level in your car and risk it getting too low. On one occasion, it got dangerously low (the sports coupe) in between the recommended maintenance intervals. After this experience, I learned to check my oil level periodically, top it off if needed, and have the peace of mind. I still maintain that this is good practice, but you are free to do whatever you choose.


    Ummm ok, BUT, although I agree that synthetic oils are far superior to organic ones, they still dont keep an engine running "smoother".
  • nagantnagant Posts: 176
    This is sort of off-topic, but I got to thinking about something on people when it comes to cars. We really only know the vehicles that we've spent time with. Maybe some of the information we have transfers to a vehicle that uses the same platform, engine, etc. So if you're familiar with say a mid-90s Crown Victoria, then you can speak without issue on a mid-90s Mercury Grand Marquis. You'd still probably be okay talking about a Lincoln Town Car from that era, because they used the same platform, engine, etc. The further afield you go, the less that you can be CERTAIN about what you're talking about, but you're probably okay for the most part.

    Which leads to my main point. Just think if the only experience you have is with bad cars. You're cruising around in your car, perfectly content with it, think it's great, but you don't understand just how horribly this car is compared to just about everything else. What everyone else derides, you consider THE ride. It'd be like not knowing that you can get beef in any other form than either ground chuck or MAYBE Lean. The guy that's had a chance to sample Sirloin isn't happy with Ground Chuck. He'll eat it if he has too, but only till he can afford the Sirloin.

    So when we get to a point of a car that there is an article devoted to the dipstick (which I'm not disputing can be irritating), think how far we've come with vehicles.

    I've had some great cars. I've had some horrible cars. Okay, one horrible car, the 2006 PT Loser that my wife talked me into. I've had some middling cars that weren't bad, but weren't exceptional. I've had vehicles that were perfectly suited for what I needed from them, I've had others that I forced to fit a role they weren't designed for. But if all I knew was my WORST car, the PT Cruiser, to me, it'd be normal and not that bad.

    Imagine if someone from the 60s took a modern car out for a drive without the passage of time, where they could see the advancements progress. They'd be blown away by a freaking Civic or Focus on the speed, acceleration, and handling. And the tech gadgets would confuse the snot out them.

    Just a thought.



    One does not have to go that far back to realize how much better newer cars are. I recently changed a main fuel pump relay on an friend's 89 Acura Legend L. This is a one owner car garaged all its life but driven a decent amount (199K miles) that has been pretty reliable but YUCK! Uncomfortable seats with the steering wheel too far away, horrible plastics and in typical Honda fashion, every thing you want to do requres you do it twice......want to use the cruise? First turn on the switch on the dash (American cars stopped this in the 70s) then use it. Want to set the seat memory? Turn on the master switch on the dash. Want to pop the trunk? Dont forget to keep the master switch on in the glovebox. All in all, a pretty miserable car to have to drive......not too bad to ride in but driving is not in the least bit enjoyable.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    I had a 1986 Acura Integra and having to rurn the cruise control on before using it also bothered me back then. However, every car I've driven the last 15 years including all my current Fords and many different rental cars requires you to turn on the cruise control before activating it.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    @akirby : Are there cars that use auto-cruise control? I'm not sure if you're joking, or if your post is related to something I'm missing.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    edited December 2015
    On my Fusion and all my other vehicles there is a cruise control on/off button in addition to set/resume/+/-. You must turn the cruise control ON before you can set a speed. It stays on until you turn off the vehicle or you hit the Off button. While it's ON you can set a new speed, resume, increase or decrease the speed or cancel the current setting by touching the brakes.

    You can't simply hit the Set button after you start the vehicle.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,062
    As I suspected it's a safety feature. Personally I don't see the difference - resume would only work if you had been using the cruise control earlier in the same driving session which means it would have to already be ON. But I'm sure some ambulance chasing lawyer somewhere sued a mfr and won at some point so now we have to press that extra button every time we get in the car. Gee, thanks!

    http://www.dallasnews.com/business/columnists/car-talk/20121116-cruise-controls-on-off-switch-there-for-a-reason.ece
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    @akirby : I understand my confusion about your cruise control post now. You were answering @nagant 's post where he was talking about the cruise control on the old Subi. Somehow, his post got lost in my feed, even after he'd quoted me. Oddly, he thinks the PT Cruiser is a wonderful car, while I used to get road rage just getting into the one I had. That's why all cars aren't the same. Different people, different tastes.
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