Not So Hot Concept, But Excellent Execution - 2015 BMW M235i Convertible Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 10,137
edited January 2016 in BMW
imageNot So Hot Concept, But Excellent Execution - 2015 BMW M235i Convertible Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.com takes a closer look at the differences between the faults of its 2015 BMW M235i convertible concept and the strengths of its execution.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • kirkhilles1kirkhilles1 Member Posts: 863
    That's good to hear. All you hear about is raw performance as if the Average Joe only took his $56k vehicle to the track. A car like this is meant to be enjoyed on all roads and on commutes and weekend drives and short trips.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasMember Posts: 501
    I don't know... I have mixed views on it. It used to be that if a car company put a badge on the car, like "SS, RS, GT, R/T, M, SVT, Z, Z-something" or so-on, you knew you were getting something special, more focused on performance, with a lot better handling, braking, acceleration, top speed, and/or less weight. They were the factory street/strip machines. Then they started getting plushed up to appeal to a broader customer base, which diluted their meanings. Now, you can have econobox cars rolling around that are really no different from the "normal" versions, but you've got the performance label and a carbon-fiber dash applique. Never mind that the carbon-fiber is really molded plastic. I think a car can be "good" without it having to have the performance labels, but I never consider it good when the performance labels don't offer the performance.
  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisMember Posts: 509
    "Like many who enjoy driving, I wince at the concept of a convertible variant of a car that wasn't wholly intended to be one from the outset, like a Miata or Boxster."

    I'm perplexed by the wording of this statement. The Miata and Boxster were intended to be convertibles from the outset, were they not?
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasMember Posts: 501
    ebeaudoin said:

    "Like many who enjoy driving, I wince at the concept of a convertible variant of a car that wasn't wholly intended to be one from the outset, like a Miata or Boxster."

    I'm perplexed by the wording of this statement. The Miata and Boxster were intended to be convertibles from the outset, were they not?

    @ebeaudoin :
    It's a bit twisted on the wording, but that's what Carlos Lago was saying. The Miata & Boxster were designed as convertibles from the get-go. By then adding the fixed-roof (which stiffened the chassis even more), you didn't sacrifice structural integrity and strength by chopping the top. As opposed to what they did with this BMW, which was decapitate it, but then duct-tapeing it's bottom end together to keep the body from warping/flexing under acceleration.
  • throwbackthrowback Member Posts: 445
    I am looking forward to driving a M2
  • adantiumadantium Member Posts: 42
    Try a Mustang convertible. You're knocking what you haven't tried. I own one and they're very quiet on the road. The ride is good and there's not much if any cowl shake at all.
  • roadburnerroadburner Member Posts: 15,113
    The HPDEs where I instruct do not allow convertibles without an SCCA approved cage, so a droptop is never on my radar. Track ability is a major factor when I'm shopping for a DD.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2018 330i xDrive

Sign In or Register to comment.