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Rides Well With or Without Cargo - 2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,112
edited January 2016 in Ford
imageRides Well With or Without Cargo - 2015 Ford F-150 Long-Term Road Test

How does a 2015 Ford F-150 handle a bed full of heavy cargo?

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Comments

  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    I'm not knocking this particular truck. But I seriously have to wonder about the ride quality posts when we're talking the equivalent weight of a fat guy. Don't get me wrong. I can see how weight extended out beyond the wheelbase can gave a greater effect on a vehicle's driving dynamics. But with only about 200 lbs in the bed, the truck should handle about like it would empty. In fact, don't most trucks use progressive weight springs now to ensure a smooth ride until you really start getting close to max carrying capacity? 30 years ago, when a half done truck could only carry 1,000 lbs (including the weight of the passengers & driver), if you had a cab full of people, the 200 lbs could possibly impact the drive quality because you were near the stated limit. Now, most of the trucks are rated to have approximately 1700-2000 lbs (including the driver & passengers). So where before 200 lbs was about 20 percent of max capacity, now it's between 10 and 11 percent.
  • I'm not knocking this particular truck. But I seriously have to wonder about the ride quality posts when we're talking the equivalent weight of a fat guy. Don't get me wrong. I can see how weight extended out beyond the wheelbase can gave a greater effect on a vehicle's driving dynamics. But with only about 200 lbs in the bed, the truck should handle about like it would empty. In fact, don't most trucks use progressive weight springs now to ensure a smooth ride until you really start getting close to max carrying capacity? 30 years ago, when a half done truck could only carry 1,000 lbs (including the weight of the passengers & driver), if you had a cab full of people, the 200 lbs could possibly impact the drive quality because you were near the stated limit. Now, most of the trucks are rated to have approximately 1700-2000 lbs (including the driver & passengers). So where before 200 lbs was about 20 percent of max capacity, now it's between 10 and 11 percent.

    This. And nobody with access to a pickup truck buys mulch or topsoil by the bag...you take the equivalent dollar amount of BULK mulch and topsoil, then come back and tell us how the ride changes. Not shown in photo: the color-coordinated Martha Stewart Living dirt rake and work gloves.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    edited January 2016
    Quote error thing caused me to have to repost. If anyone on Edmunds can delete this particular post; or better yet, make it look like I'm witty, urbane, and cultured; please go right ahead.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501

    t.

    This. And nobody with access to a pickup truck buys mulch or topsoil by the bag...you take the equivalent dollar amount of BULK mulch and topsoil, then come back and tell us how the ride changes. Not shown in photo: the color-coordinated Martha Stewart Living dirt rake and work gloves.
    I'm not going to criticize the method of acquiring the mulch and topsoil. I'll be honest, for most people, it's more convenient to just go buy the bags at Home Depot/Lowes/Wal-Mart. It's easier to unload and store. It's more expensive, yes, but the weight would be about the same. I'm not denigrating what they got or how they got it. I'm just questioning the general purpose of a 200 lb load in a pickup.
  • Just joshing them a bit...but bulk product is a lot easier to load than bagged - they do it for you.

    And your basic point about weight I agree with...this photo shows a cargo that should really not make a difference.
  • Really. It should ride like nothing was back there because when it is capable of carrying 1,700 lbs in the bed a couple of bags of mulch is nothing. An interesting test would be to load the Ram EcoDiesel on a trailer tow it for a 100 miles or so with the F-150; then do the return trip with the F-150 on a trailer and tow it back with the Ram. This would really test the muscle of the Ford and the Ram. Which engine choice works best when a truck is used as a truck. Small displacement turbocharged gas engines or the grunt of a small displacement turbo diesel.
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