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Where The Trunk Is The Button? - 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited February 2016 in Mazda
imageWhere The Trunk Is The Button? - 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata Convertible Long-Term Road Test

In search of the 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata rear trunk release button -- does it even have one?

Read the full story here


Comments

  • schen72schen72 Posts: 433
    That location does seem a little "too low" but it does leave the back of the car unblemished. I imagine it's also better protected from dirt and grime in that location.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    I actually miss trunks having a key hole to manual unlock the trunk. I'm one of those irritating "old school" people that want to do crazy things like open a door if there's a problem with a dead battery (whether car or fob), sensor, whatever.
  • cmhj2000cmhj2000 Se, Pa.Posts: 381
    Out side poor use of grammar in the title, "Where the trunk is the button" I prefer the old ways.
  • I like VW's solution better, but also because their's doubles as a rear camera. Not only is it a neat parlor trick, it's also useful since the camera doesn't get as dirty/wet.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    @cmhj2000 : I understand what you mean about the "old ways." I'm also the guy that whines about the fact that some cars have the fuel door on the left side and some have it on the right. I'd be thrilled if they'd move it back to the rear again (like behind the license plate). I know, they moved it to try to prevent an explosion from an accident, but it was so convenient to be able to pull in to either side of the pump and fill up.
  • cmhj2000cmhj2000 Se, Pa.Posts: 381

    @cmhj2000 : I understand what you mean about the "old ways." I'm also the guy that whines about the fact that some cars have the fuel door on the left side and some have it on the right. I'd be thrilled if they'd move it back to the rear again (like behind the license plate). I know, they moved it to try to prevent an explosion from an accident, but it was so convenient to be able to pull in to either side of the pump and fill up.

    The filler tube being on one side or the other I actually like. Ya I hear ya' but I never liked the way I had to bend over in bad weather to fill my tank. Being 6'3" I like to stand up. oh well give me back a key and toggle switch and I'd be happy too. Yet the wife has a new 16 Forester touring with everything possible and I cant open the damn lift gate. Wooo is me.
  • schen72schen72 Posts: 433
    edited February 2016
    cmhj2000 said:

    @cmhj2000 : I understand what you mean about the "old ways." I'm also the guy that whines about the fact that some cars have the fuel door on the left side and some have it on the right. I'd be thrilled if they'd move it back to the rear again (like behind the license plate). I know, they moved it to try to prevent an explosion from an accident, but it was so convenient to be able to pull in to either side of the pump and fill up.

    The filler tube being on one side or the other I actually like. Ya I hear ya' but I never liked the way I had to bend over in bad weather to fill my tank. Being 6'3" I like to stand up. oh well give me back a key and toggle switch and I'd be happy too. Yet the wife has a new 16 Forester touring with everything possible and I cant open the damn lift gate. Wooo is me.
    You guys must be old! (haha!) I personally love proximity keys and keyless ignitions. BTW, car doors do have redundant manual keyholes in case of dead keyfob. There is usually a hidden key inside the fob.
  • 5vzfe5vzfe Posts: 161
    schen72 said:

    cmhj2000 said:

    @cmhj2000 : I understand what you mean about the "old ways." I'm also the guy that whines about the fact that some cars have the fuel door on the left side and some have it on the right. I'd be thrilled if they'd move it back to the rear again (like behind the license plate). I know, they moved it to try to prevent an explosion from an accident, but it was so convenient to be able to pull in to either side of the pump and fill up.

    The filler tube being on one side or the other I actually like. Ya I hear ya' but I never liked the way I had to bend over in bad weather to fill my tank. Being 6'3" I like to stand up. oh well give me back a key and toggle switch and I'd be happy too. Yet the wife has a new 16 Forester touring with everything possible and I cant open the damn lift gate. Wooo is me.
    You guys must be old! (haha!) I personally love proximity keys and keyless ignitions. BTW, car doors do have redundant manual keyholes in case of dead keyfob. There is usually a hidden key inside the fob.
    He's right, I know on many Volkswagens, they are hidden under a plastic cover right at the end of the handle. There's also other little hacks that can get you in, but you'd have to work at a dealership or something to know them for security reasons. And as for the gas pump thing, the grocery chain that I work at has gas pumps with a special rotating nozzle that allows you to pull into any pump on any side. Their hoses are extra long and they are suspended up a little ways to clear taller vehicles.
  • cmhj2000cmhj2000 Se, Pa.Posts: 381
    edited February 2016
    Yup old enough to know better but still too young to resist.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    Yeah, I've seen some pumps that have hoses long enough to go to the "far side" to fill the tank, but you never know if you really have enough length. Plus, you just look like a dork standing that far away from the pump. As for the "hidden key" part, I've seen that in the newer fobs too. But, like with the Ram trucks, the key will only unlock the door, you still have to have that weird slotted fob thing to start the truck. Plus, I haven't tested it, but if the alarm is set on the truck and you unlock with that key, I would think it would set off the alarm with no way to deactivate it without a working fob.

    As for the gas filler location, my preference, at least right now, is for it to be on the Driver's Side. I think the passenger's side is a stupid location. And even if they did put it back behind the license plate, which would mean left or right didn't matter, then I'd probably still complain about having times where I couldn't pull far enough in to get the hose to it because of another vehicle sitting in front of me. Basically, you can find fault with anything if you try hard enough.
  • @daryleason Ram's key is a reminder when Mercedes owned Chrysler. The keys were first used on Mercedes cars in the late 90's and were very advanced at the time and IMO are better than the bladed cut keys. The "keys" are remote transmitters and all you're doing is turning a toggle switch to activate the ignition. Just like push button start but you're turning a switch instead. The emergency procedure for the first Mercedes push button system was to pry off the button to reveal the traditional slot to insert the key and turn to start.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    @allthingshonda : Really? I didn't know that. Thanks for telling me. So, do you know if the slot that you're referring to on the Ram pickups is removable with the option of using the regular key in the event that you don't have the fob, for whatever reason? I don't own a Ram pickup. We had a 2014 Ram 3500 as a shop truck, for a while, and a friend of mine has a 2015 Ram SLT Laramie Lonestar, but there's no way I'm going to start trying to pry that fob-slot (sounds kinky, doesn't it?) off to see if there's a regular key hole behind it.
  • @daryleason No it doesn't pry off on the Ram I'm not sure about newer Mercedes. It now works similar to Honda and Toyota systems. If the battery in the fob is weak or dead you press the end of the key against the button for a couple of seconds then push the button with the end of the key. I'm guessing the immobilizer transmitter is in the tip of the key. The pop off button is ingenious since you can take it off if you want to stick with the traditional method
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