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LX Turbo Is the One to Get - 2016 Kia Optima Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited March 2016 in Kia
imageLX Turbo Is the One to Get - 2016 Kia Optima Long-Term Road Test

For the 2016 Kia Optima, we'd recommend getting the LX Turbo trim level for its blend of features and ride comfort.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • s197gts197gt Posts: 486
    Short of the heated seats there isn't anything I'd miss.

    As I get older I really don't need the highest HP engine anymore and I was just commenting yesterday (again) to my wife about the TERRIBLE roads that seem to be everywhere. 16" wheels are definitely the way to go anymore; besides, I like to buy aftermarket wheels to suit my taste.

    I think I am going to look at the construction season a bit differently this summer.
  • adamb1adamb1 Cookeville, TNPosts: 122
    I'm too lazy to look up the true market price for this car. But, $27k and change is what I paid for a new, fully loaded, Fusion Titanium. No thanks Kia.
  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    edited March 2016
    I'm not a big fan of huge rims and skinny tires. I was born during the tail-end of the 70s, grew up in the 80s, and started (legally) driving in the 90s. Which means, to me, most cars don't look cool with a 20 inch rim and a 1/4 inch of sidewall. I get why some companies do it, due to the size of the disc brakes. As for the pricing that Adam1 mentioned, I agree with Edmunds that the car is probably priced about right on MSRP, simply because Kia is normally pretty good about offering generous discounts.

    But am I the only person that seems to get car values stuck in their heads from when they first started driving? I'll give you an example. When I saw the $27K price listed for the Optima, I immediately flashed back to my parents buying a 1993 Chevrolet 1500 Silverado extended cab, SWB, 5.7 Liter V8, fully loaded (except for leather) for just under $22K AFTER tax, title, & license. Back then, that was a HUGE price for a truck. It's hard to believe that 1, that's been over 20 years ago, and 2, that inflation has hit us that hard. I KNOW the 27K is about right, but I don't FEEL it's right. Y'all got me?
  • ebeaudoinebeaudoin NE IllinoisPosts: 509
    adamb1 said:

    I'm too lazy to look up the true market price for this car. But, $27k and change is what I paid for a new, fully loaded, Fusion Titanium. No thanks Kia.

    And that Ford was probably discounted quite a bit to $27k. Nobody will pay MSRP for a Kia, just like you didn't for the Fusion.
  • bankerdannybankerdanny Posts: 1,021
    edited March 2016
    $27k isn't expensive for a sedan of this size today, but even with 0% financing you're looking at a $400+/month payment on a 60 month loan, which isn't affordable in my world.
  • schen72schen72 Posts: 433
    People seem to get hung up on MSRP and are always comparing the MSRP prices of cars. No one actually pays anywhere near MSRP, right? At least I don't. It's more realistic to compare the real market value of a car, because I'm 100% sure deals can be had on this Kia to bring the price way below MSRP. I just bought an Acura a few weeks ago, and I paid about $4000 below invoice.
  • s197gts197gt Posts: 486
    well, ideally, hopefully, a buyer has some kind of down-payment as well and/or some equity in a trade-in.

    invoice, plus trade-in, plus down-payment, plus 0% apr...
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