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Every Car Should Be Like This - 2016 Chevrolet Volt

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited August 2016 in Chevrolet
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Every Car Should Be Like This - 2016 Chevrolet Volt

The 2016 Chevrolet Volt is the perfect combination of EV functionality and gas-powered peace of mind. Every car should be like this.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • daryleasondaryleason TexasPosts: 501
    I"m not sure about the other things you mentioned, but you're definitely wrong about the "gas-price anxiety" part. That anxiety is brought about by a fixed reference point. For the kids that didn't start noticing gas prices until they were sitting at about 2.50 a gallon, the prices seem great, right now. But when they hit 4.00 a gallon, it's going to cause anxiety just because it's doubled your fuel costs (roughly). Human nature is to adjust your budget when you save in one area, you can spend more in the other. It doesn't matter if your car gets 20 mpg or 40 mpg. Increasing fuel costs causes anxiety.
  • adamb1adamb1 Cookeville, TNPosts: 122
    If city economy were a priority for me, and it's not since I live in a small town, why do I have to drive something so ugly to achieve it. Prius are ugly too.
  • bankerdannybankerdanny Posts: 1,021
    You could always drive a Camry Hybrid, Optima Hybrid, Fusion Hybrid, C-Max, Sonata Hybrid, or Escape Hybrid. Any of those will get you great city mileage without the odd look of the Prius.
  • You're not wrong, Josh. I think the Volt is the perfect tool for a LOT of people, even if they don't know it. Serious range in EV-only mode, serious gas mpg in that mode, and real-car performance in both modes, unlike the i3.

    In probably 80% of American work commutes, you would be paying pennies per day (maybe nickels or dimes...) to run this thing. On a weekend trip, you could drive it 600 miles per day without a care in the world...just like a regular ICE car.
  • bankerdannybankerdanny Posts: 1,021
    The problem LTL, is that you save pennies, but those pennies, plus some dollars, were used to buy the Volt rather than the Cruz, which has the added advantage of a rear seat that actually holds 3 people.

    This is however an old argument and most people don't buy a Volt to save money, they do it because they think they are being more environmentally friendly. They probably aren't, but it feels like they are.
  • kirkhilles1kirkhilles1 Posts: 862
    "But what if every commuter car were like our long-term 2016 Chevrolet Volt? Urban fuel consumption — and thus pollution — would plummet"

    Ugh. I don't mean to be harsh here, but really? I care about the environment and all that, but come on... I mean, yeah, what if we all lived in little areas where we could bike everywhere? What if we all took the bus to work? What if? What if? I'm eager to get an electric vehicle, but I'm looking forward to the SIMPLICITY of an electric vehicle, perhaps something along the lines of a Model 3 or Bolt someday. To me, the Volt is a neat idea, but is FAR too complicated. I don't want the worries of mechanical components PLUS electrical elements. I want oil changes to be a thing of the past and don't want to be worried about my car stalling or radiator failing.
  • The problem LTL, is that you save pennies, but those pennies, plus some dollars, were used to buy the Volt rather than the Cruz, which has the added advantage of a rear seat that actually holds 3 people.

    This is however an old argument and most people don't buy a V olt to save money, they do it because they think they are being more environmentally friendly. They probably aren't, but it feels like they are.

    The stated reason for buying the car is variable depending upon the person. The actual money saved is an objective fact. Fuel prices are at a long-time low right now. That won't continue. Buying this car is a hedge against future increases in price.

    If my commute costs me $5 a day right now (about right) and the Volt would cost me $.75 worth of electricity (plus sometimes I can charge at public chargers for nothing), then that's $23 a week savings, or around $100 a month. That's a real savings, and when fuel prices go up again (not if, when), that savings will increase. The tax credit is real, too.

    And this car holds two adults in the back, plus a kid. The difference between that and a car the size of the Cruze that supposedly holds three adults in the back is mostly academic.

    I think it makes sense for a lot of people.
  • kirkhilles1kirkhilles1 Posts: 862
    The problem with doing the math for the Volt is that there are too many variables. Depreciation is a big one. How does maintenance compare? How does insurance compare? What about reliability costs? Tire costs? I get the fact that gas costs are really IN YOUR FACE (especially with the large signs), but I bet that the TCO is much more than you might think. I mean, a brand new Civic comes pretty well equipped starting at its $19.4k price (our local dealer sells LXes at $17k), whereas a Volt starts at about $34k (of course, pre-tax rebate). That's a lot of money you need to save every month to make up for the difference and 31/42 MPG in the Civic.
  • For me a huge advantage of these types of cars is hardly ever having to go to a gas station. I mean, how much fun is it handling those filthy pumps while hoping your credit (or even worse debit) card has been skimmed?
  • throwbackthrowback Posts: 445
    I have driven the new Volt and I am impressed. If I was going to get a hybrid, this would be it. However I am ready to go full electric for my daily driver. Alas, only the Model S fits my bill which is too expensive for me with paying for a college education in my future. I look forward to the Bolt but I need real world 200 mile range if it is going to be my main diver. My wife's not giving up her Mini!
  • notfastnotfast Posts: 89
    Every company doesn't make a similar car because: America. We all need monster SUV's to tow our boats to the lake every weekend.

    My biggest issue with hybrids (at least the larger sedan versions like Accord and Fusion) is that the battery eats too much of the trunk for my needs. But no, I refuse an SUV for me.
  • bassracerxbassracerx Posts: 188
    The volt solution is obviously a stopgap between super efficient ICE cars and full electric cars but it will probably remain viable for decades to come in several applications. The problem is partially price and also GM's unwillingness to decontent the vehicle into a lower price point more regular folks can afford or bring that technology into a cruze or sonic like package. Also you would think that a crossover version of the volt would be in the works by now due to the current market conditions. Also the styling of the new one is much better the first one was NOT a looker and it did the car no favors.

    Too many people focus on the small range of the electric system and figured if they could not do their entire commute on all electricity then the car was just not "worth it" and so they bought priuses instead i guess? but at worst you burned through a half gallon of premium if you drove 100 miles a day. I completely agree with josh and wonder why more automakers don't fall in line with this line of thinking. The main drawback which in the grand scheme of things is getting a charging station installed in your house. when the volt first came out they were very pricy but now they are cheaper but a still not insignificant cost.
  • It all comes down to your personality and what you are willing to pay. If you really are in a money saving mode, then buy & drive a 5 year old Civic or Hyundai. They will last forever and save you a lot of money. I am quite happy driving a 2015 Volt. I made an end of the year discount deal and paid only $27,500. So with my tax rebate, that I need, my final net price ends up about $20,000, Having a new hi-tech car that is silky smooth and quiet to drive satisfies both my pocketbook and my personality. If gas prices go up, I'll enjoy it even more.
  • txtdinerdtxtdinerd Posts: 4
    edited April 2016
    How does the 2016 Volt compare on interior dimensions as compared with 2015 and older Volts? I just test drove a 2012 Volt and it felt small inside and tight in the rear seat area. The cargo room seemed acceptable but the passenger space not as much. I somewhat liked the test drive experience otherwise, but the tight feel while driving killed the positive experience.
  • KeerockKeerock Posts: 25
    txtdinerd said:

    How does the 2016 Volt compare on interior dimensions as compared with 2015 and older Volts? I just test drove a 2012 Volt and it felt small inside and tight in the rear seat area. The cargo room seemed acceptable but the passenger space not as much. I somewhat liked the test drive experience otherwise, but the tight feel while driving killed the positive experience.

    Just test drove the 2017. I never drove the earlier model type so have no comparison. Here are my thoughts. I'm 6 ft, 190 lbs.

    Drivers seat is extremely comfortable and roomy. This is with the seat pushed all the way back and steering wheel adjusted. Good arm rest locations etc. Does not feel even remotely tight.

    Driver's side passenger seat: Not great legroom but passable, my knees were close to the drivers but had about 1.5 inches to work with. Remember, driver's seat was all the way back.
    Headroom: Gack! not good and claustrophobic inducing (I exaggerate but you get the point) with the left pillar right next to my left ear. Top of my head maybe a half an inch fro the roof. My hair was brushing against it (no I don't have 80's hair). I think someone my size would get used to it but without being able to scootch down (remember my knee room) I felt maybe not.

    Front passenger seat about 3/4 back. Very comfy, have asked but I know my wife will be very happy with the room.

    Rear passenger seat. 3/4 front seat placement makes a huge difference.
    Headroom: obvisouly same as driver's side just reversed but because I had more knee room, I could scotch down to get more headroom with a bit of a sloach.

    Middle rear seat: Fuhgettaboutit! I think excellent place for a child (not rear facing baby seat) seat and that's it.

    Hatchback trunk: I'm leaving a Prius lease and this is the main reason I'm very close to getting the Volt. It appears to be highly utiltarian.
  • KeerockKeerock Posts: 25
    Clarifying the hatchback comment I made. Basically I am feeling that I feel the Volt is a better car than the Prius except the rear legroom and rear seat comfort. The hatchback helped me even consider the Volt as an alternative and once I drove it, they are night and day experiences. So the trade off was not as bad knowing the Volt could work as a hatchback.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited May 2016
    What kind of stuff do you usually haul in your hatchback(s)?

    We're trying to downsize to one and we've looked at the Prius and Prius V a lot (and a lot of other "boxes", like the Soul).

    The Volt seems kind of pricy though, maybe $10k more than the Prius.
  • KeerockKeerock Posts: 25
    Mostly golf bags and luggage and boxes here and there. Nothing crazy. But for example, yesterday I took the Prius to pick up 16 large bags of mulch. Fit ok with all the seats down, driving a lo-rider though. I don't think they would all fit in the Volt as the hatchback slopes more than the Prius and cubic ft capacity is listed as less.

    That is the one concern I have the with the Volt as a cargo hauler. Taller, longer boxes will hit the window when it's closed.

    But, we have a Subaru Outback for that stuff so it's not a big concern.

    For the price, look into the tax credits both Fed and State. Most likely you will see the Volt gets a bigger one based on the 18kw batteries. It brings the prices much closer together.

    Also, no more Prius Plugins so far in 2016. Maybe on the future?
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Thanks, sounds a bit like the stuff we haul but we will probably keep the minivan for junk runs around town.

    You know, I keep forgetting about those tax breaks. :s
  • KeerockKeerock Posts: 25
    Here in CT, $7,500 federal, $3,000 state... although I don't quite know how they work together as I don't think I would be getting a $10,500 tax break... but perhaps I might be?
  • For people like me with a one-car household, the Volt makes affordable sense for electric driving 80-90% of the time around town and a gas engine backup for road trips. When an affordable Tesla is available along with its awesome nationwide Supercharger system for long-distance trips, I'll make the switch to 100% EV. Until then, the Volt is ideal.
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