Edmunds dealer partner, Bayway Leasing, is now offering transparent lease deals via these forums. Click here to see May lease deals!
Options

Still Has a Mountain Mode, but Seems Less Necessary - 2016 Chevrolet Volt

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 10,315
edited August 2016 in Chevrolet
image
Still Has a Mountain Mode, but Seems Less Necessary - 2016 Chevrolet Volt

The 2016 Chevrolet Volt has a mountain mode for driving on hilly terrain, but it doesn't seem very necessary anymore.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • Options
    longtimelurkerlongtimelurker Member Posts: 455
    More evidence that GM really made tons of improvements in this car over the last-gen model. It's a solution to many people's transportation needs.
  • Options
    mercedesfanmercedesfan Member Posts: 365
    With the 2nd-gen Volt it seems like GM decided to focus more on making this a hybrid with a really long all-electric mode, rather than an electric car with a generator. I think that is why it works so much better. Toyota has proved that hybrids can actually work really well so it makes sense to try and expand those capabilities rather than reinventing the wheel. I'm really impressed with these new Volts.
  • Options
    darthbimmerdarthbimmer Member Posts: 606
    This was a crucial real-world driving test. The Volt basically aced it. I'm not interested in this particular model car but I am watching to see how BEV hybrid technology develops.
  • Options
    steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    edited April 2016
    @mercedesfan, not only that but GM has bested Toyota at their own game - the Prius plug-in hybrid is only good for something like 11 miles in all electric mode.
  • Options
    5vzfe5vzfe Member Posts: 161
    stever said:

    @mercedesfan, not only that but GM has bested Toyota at their own game - the Prius plug-in hybrid is only good for something like 11 miles in all electric mode.

    The new Prius Prime is now expected to get 22 miles of electric range, which is comparable to most other PHEVs, but it's no match for the Volt's 53 miles in that regard. However, it's also estimated that the Prime will match the regular Prius in combined MPG, at 52 (the previous Prius Plug-in also matched the regular model). This would give the Prime 600 miles of total range with a full tank and battery, versus the Volt's 42 mpg and 420 miles of total range. I think Edmunds should've waited for the Prime and done a more complete comparison, and see which is more preferable, more electric range or better gas mileage, which range is more useful ultimately etc. - could be pretty interesting.
  • Options
    banhughbanhugh Member Posts: 315
    edited April 2016
    If I had to pick a fuel efficient car today I would get a Volt no doubt. I like it inside out more than the Prius and Edmund's posts so far seem to verify that
  • Options
    longtimelurkerlongtimelurker Member Posts: 455
    5vzfe said:

    stever said:

    @mercedesfan, not only that but GM has bested Toyota at their own game - the Prius plug-in hybrid is only good for something like 11 miles in all electric mode.

    The new Prius Prime is now expected to get 22 miles of electric range, which is comparable to most other PHEVs, but it's no match for the Volt's 53 miles in that regard. However, it's also estimated that the Prime will match the regular Prius in combined MPG, at 52 (the previous Prius Plug-in also matched the regular model). This would give the Prime 600 miles of total range with a full tank and battery, versus the Volt's 42 mpg and 420 miles of total range. I think Edmunds should've waited for the Prime and done a more complete comparison, and see which is more preferable, more electric range or better gas mileage, which range is more useful ultimately etc. - could be pretty interesting.
    The secret to the Volt's commuting superiority is in the average American commute...the predominate usage profile. According to the USDOT, around 53% of American driving-to-work commutes are within the Prius' battery-only driving range, vs around 87% for the Volt. So on a long trip, the Volt will use more gas and have to be filled more often, but in a scenario where the car is used for commuting and recharged every night, the Volt will use less gas and have to be filled less often.

    My commute is 26 miles...right at the Volt's battery limit. In an average work week, with the Prius I would use around $7.50 worth of gas. With the Volt I would use none. For a weekend trip, starting with fully-charged batteries, I would have to drive more than 200 miles without an ability to recharge, to benefit from the Prius' better mpg.
  • Options
    justoneopinionjustoneopinion Member Posts: 21
    I have a 40-mile roundtrip commute, on the days I don't ride the bus, and my 2017 Volt easily has the range for an 100% electric commute, even with a few errands added on. Also, the "Hold Mode" (similar in function to the "Mountain Mode" described in this post), allows me to force the gas engine on to preserve my battery charge. For example, if I am going to drive 75 miles of combined highway and city street driving, I select Hold to run the gas engine in its most efficient mode on the highway, and then Normal to drive with the electric motors in their most efficient mode on city streets. Best of both worlds.
Sign In or Register to comment.