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Front Traffic Sensors - 2016 Toyota Prius Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Posts: 10,059
edited June 2016 in Toyota
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Front Traffic Sensors - 2016 Toyota Prius Long-Term Road Test

The front parking sensors on our 2016 Toyota Prius are sensitive enough to go off in stop-and-go traffic.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • agentorangeagentorange Posts: 893
    Yes, you're too close. First clue is that the rear tyres of the car in front cannot be seen.
  • misterfusionmisterfusion Posts: 471
    edited June 2016
    Hmm, in my driver training class (a long time ago, granted) we were taught that stopping right at the point where you can no longer see the preceding car's tires was a reasonable distance. Looks close from behind the wheel, but I think it averaged out to about 3 ft./1 meter between bumpers, which seems reasonable in stopped traffic. Maybe this is why rear sensors are more common than front+rear sensors?
  • 5vzfe5vzfe Posts: 161
    That's about as much space I'd leave as well, but I might change that. I just saw a car accident when I was on my lunch break at work, where a woman (Mazda 3) rear-ended a man in a Chevy Malibu (stopped at a red light). He was too close to the car ahead of him and the force of the accident caused him to lift his foot off the brake pedal and his car rear-ended the car he was behind. She wasn't going very fast - maybe 20 mph but it was enough. None of it looked too bad, but maybe conservative parking beeps can help avoid unfortunate insurance claims. I'm sure that guy is going to be at fault for being too close even though he was hit first.
  • banhughbanhugh Posts: 315
    its called leave yourself an out.
  • agentorangeagentorange Posts: 893

    Hmm, in my driver training class (a long time ago, granted) we were taught that stopping right at the point where you can no longer see the preceding car's tires was a reasonable distance.

    The standard has changed from what I see on local TV regarding driving in traffic.
    banhugh said:

    its called leave yourself an out.

    That's my thinking too. Having traveled to some "interesting" places, I leave a distance such that I can swing left or right without ramming the vehicle in front, even though I'm quite prepared to do so.
  • misterfusionmisterfusion Posts: 471
    edited June 2016
    At least for me, the "can't see the tires" distance leaves enough room to steer around the car ahead. I suppose this might change if I were driving a long-hood/shallow-turn vehicle like a pickup truck, or maybe an XK-E. :P
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