How can I COMPLETELY DISABLE the TPMS on my 2008 Toyota Sienna?

ebc1973ebc1973 Posts: 1
edited May 2017 in Toyota
I don't want to put a piece of orange tape over the light. I want the system to be completely disabled. I know how to use a tire pressure gauge. I don't want to replace my sensors. Period. I cannot find anything out there telling me how to do this. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!!

Answers

  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,420
    edited May 2017
    Since TPMS is a Federally mandated safety system, it is illegal to disable it.

    https://www.nhtsa.gov/search?keywords=TPMS&name=
  • DomRensDomRens Posts: 1
    Since TPMS is a Federally mandated safety system, it is illegal to disable it. 

    Kind of true. It's illegal for a commercial entity to do so. From the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, (which created the NHTSA) "Making Safety Devices Inoperative":

    A manufacturer, distributor, dealer, or motor vehicle repair business (emphasis added) may not knowingly make inoperative any part of a de- vice or element of design installed on or in a motor vehicle or motor vehicle equipment in compliance with an applicable motor vehicle safety standard prescribed under this chapter unless the manufacturer, distributor, dealer, or repair business reasonably believes the vehicle or equipment will not be used (except for testing or a similar purpose during maintenance or re- pair) when the device or element is inoperative.

    This language is referenced in the Final Rule of the TPMS at the link you provided  (top of page 106). Vehicle owners can do whatever they want, as long as their vehicles adhere to state safety inspection requirements, in which TPMS is not a requirement.   
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,420
    The law as written can allow for loose interpretations. That doesn't mean that it is legal, let alone safe or wise to attempt to disable a vehicle safety system.  If you take the O.P.s original statement that he doesn't need a vehicle that turns on a light when there is a tire pressure issue and combine that with the idea that he might have to put a piece of tape over it that leads to recognizing that if the light is on, he actually isn't as good at keeping the tires properly inflated as he thinks that be is. 
  • DougMorfDougMorf IdahoPosts: 1

    The law as written can allow for loose interpretations. That doesn't mean that it is legal, let alone safe or wise to attempt to disable a vehicle safety system.  If you take the O.P.s original statement that he doesn't need a vehicle that turns on a light when there is a tire pressure issue and combine that with the idea that he might have to put a piece of tape over it that leads to recognizing that if the light is on, he actually isn't as good at keeping the tires properly inflated as he thinks that be is. 

    I think you're missing some things here. The first being that if you think I or the OP feel any obligation to heed any law governing what we do with our property, you are mistaken. The second point you are missing is that this is about money, not his ability to monitor his car's vitals. He isn't willing to spend the money to replace the sensors, and it is within his right not to regardless of the law. He's made a choice not to spend money on this unneeded maintenance, but he does not want to see the light or a piece of electrical tape on his cluster. Understandable. If you don't find this understandable, you should probably keep it to yourself. You don't need to understand why other people decide to live their lives differently from you.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 5,420
    edited November 2019
    DougMorf said:


    I think you're missing some things here. The first being that if you think I or the OP feel any obligation to heed any law governing what we do with our property, you are mistaken.

    Is it only with the TPMS system that you feel this way or does that include other systems as well? Things like the ABS, or Airbags? This is really going to be fun when owners try to work around problems instead of fixing them when they affect advanced drivers assistance systems.
    DougMorf said:


    The second point you are missing is that this is about money, not his ability to monitor his car's vitals. He isn't willing to spend the money to replace the sensors, and it is within his right not to regardless of the law. He's made a choice not to spend money on this unneeded maintenance, but he does not want to see the light or a piece of electrical tape on his cluster. Understandable.

    No I haven't missed anything here, I've seen these kinds of attitudes for decades. It is true he doesn't have to replace the sensors when they fail, by design that turns the warning lamp on. It is a safety system and needs to alert the driver that there is a problem with it. If the TPMS system is down, the lamp needs to be on.
    DougMorf said:


    If you don't find this understandable, you should probably keep it to yourself. You don't need to understand why other people decide to live their lives differently from you.

    This is an open forum where anyone has the right to respond. Even people who really do know how all of this is supposed to work.



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