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A/C question blows hot!!

kgdenniskgdennis Posts: 2
edited March 2018 in Jeep
My 2011 Jeep Liberty blows hot air.
My compressor cycles of and on ever 3-4 seconds. The pressure when the compressor is on reads in the green part of the gauge, when it cycles off it reads in the red. So I don't want to add refrigerant, all though I've seen blogs that say it might be completely out of refrigerant and that is why it reads in the red and to add a can of refrigerant anyway. That makes me nervous. I've checked the fuse but can't really tell if its blown or not. What else can I check and possibly fix myself. I really don't have the money to pay a mechanic to do something I can do myself. Thanks in advance for you advice.

Comments

  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 4,987
    There is a reason why professionals use both the high side and low side gages, contact temperature testing routines and scan tool information to diagnose and repair an AC system and not just try to do it all from just the low side pressure gage. Here is a video where they touch on what might be going on, and "IF" the reason your compressor is cycling off is that the low side pressure is getting pulled too low due to a low charge then you do need to add more refrigerant to the system. The problem of course is that low side pressure cycling too low is only one possible cause for the compressor to be cycling off. Without using all of the tools that are required to evaluate high side pressure, ambient and evaporator core surface temperature, PCM control issues you are left with just the low side pressure reading and can get it wrong.

    Then there is one part of servicing AC that these kits never talk about. The sealants that are usually in them while they might help someone for a while are not permanent solutions to a leak issue. What's worse is they can damage the equipment that the shops use to service and repair their customers cars. The sealants can also cause warranties on replacement components such as compressors to be voided by the manufacturer.

    One more thing. It is illegal for anyone to vent refrigerant to the atmosphere when servicing an AC system. (See sections 608 and 609 of the clean air act) While a do it yourselfer can purchase and use refrigerant to try and charge a system, if you then discover a failure that requires a repair, the refrigerant must be removed with recovery equipment which again can be damaged by the sealant in the charging kits.

  • kgdenniskgdennis Posts: 2
    Thank you this helps.
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