Report Your Local Gas Prices Here (retired discussion, please see the new one)

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Comments

  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    Well I was including the Saudi's etc in my "Big Oil" arguement.

    Rocky
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    OUCH !!!!! Thanks "Big Oil" for gouging us. Let's let you gouch us some more by letting the UAE and Halliburton take over the ports by giving you tax revenues too. :surprise:

    Rocky
  • wilcoxwilcox Member Posts: 584
    Lemko quoted 3 grades and their pricing. Ten cents/gal. difference on level of octane.

    At the end of the 90's gas was under $1/gal around here.
    Let's say $ 0.79/gal....the price difference on grades was ten cents per gallon.

    Today our W. Ga. regular is priced @$2.29. Mid $2.39. Prem $2.49.

    10 cents difference during each observation period. Pulling out the old calculator, markup was 12.7% in '99 vs 4.4% today.

    The markup for grades today should equal 29 cents in order to maintain same ratio for that back in the '90's. Aahaha..

    "Pricing of oil is determined above the retail level,,," ??
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    NEWS ALERT:

    The Japanese save the U.S. from foreign oil.

    Rocky
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    Premium is $2.67. Filled the Passat with BP ULSD at $2.85 per gallon. Canada is well over $3 per gallon and that is where we get a big part of the oil from.
  • 210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    So do you still think your prediction of $2 for gas and $40 for a barrel of oil will come to pass by October 1st?

    We did get the $2 gas for a while, but the trend now is up. No sign of oil going down yet significantly.

    We're still comparatively lucky in central VA: $2.19 for 87, and all 3 of my vehicles use it. Kind of ironic we pay less than Texans!
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    We got 2 gas company's- The biggest inland refinery in the U.S.-Conoco Phillips in Borger Tx and we Got Valero in Dumas Tx. which I can see 25 miles from my house. Currently we are paying between $2.49-$2.60 a gallon. (Dalhart, Dumas, Amarillo) Borger, Tx. has one of the largest deposits of oil in the U.S. :confuse: We got all kinds of oil around here and we still pay out the butt. :cry:

    I drive over 180 miles round trip back n' forth to work 4-5 days a week out of 8 days. "Big Oil" loves me. :blush: I however don't feel the same. :mad: I want a divorce from them. :surprise:

    Rocky
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    ....the price is spiking again. Does anyone know why it is? Usually when prices spike like they are right now, there's some bogus excuse given on one of the news channels, but I haven't seen anything. They just seem to be ignoring this round of spikes.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    It's election year and certain party's need campaign contributions, so they are turning the other cheek. ;)

    Rocky
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    One out of two ain't bad. I am still optimistic on the $40 oil. The longer OPEC gets used to $60 oil the harder to get them back down. Saudi says it will not cut production in spite of lower demand this Spring. We shall see.

    PS
    Just last week gas hit the lowest I have seen of $1.79 in Gaffney, South Carolina of all places. It is still $1.89.

    Rocky, no excuse for $2.50 gas in TX. I expect it in CA with our Hollywood designer gas.

    http://www.gaspricewatch.com/new/
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAMember Posts: 15,306
    I hear they have gasoline formulated with Chanel No. 5 in Beverly Hills so the exhaust fumes smell nice. :P
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    You lucky ducks. Here poor ol' me that probably drives further than the both you and lemko, combined has to take a saw and axe with him to to the pump to give em' my arm and leg too. :cry:

    Rocky

    P.S.

    The cheapest I've seen it in over a month was $22.29 but that was a week and a half ago :surprise:
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    Rocky, it is supply and demand. You got the supply we got the demand. And yes you drive more than I do. I have 1800 miles in 8 months on my new PU truck. I have 7600 miles on my new Passat diesel since April last year. I can sell the VW when it is a year old in CA. Maybe the price of diesel will go down by then. I can always hope...
  • 210delray210delray Member Posts: 4,721
    In December, 87 gas in LA was going for about $2.25, despite the "designer" blends. It was close to $2.50 in Bishop, CA, way up north, and east of the Sierras. It was about the same in the high altitude areas of CO (85 octane in CO).

    We paid $2.05, the lowest, in 3 places: Kansas City, Indianapolis, and back home in old Virginny!
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    Explain octane to me. Why is 86 octance used versus the standard 87 ? We are at 4200 ft. here in Dalhart. 85 octane ??? :surprise: I've never heard of that ? 91 octane is the highest here and is only offered at a few gas stations. :confuse: MY FIL said the 90 octance would make his LS-1 2000 Corvette knock sometimes :surprise:

    Rocky
  • jae5jae5 Member Posts: 1,206
    I may be wrong but I think it has more to do with than just supply and demand. I believe it's a conditioning and acceptance and gouging going on. Basically we are angry when the price goes up sharply, then the companies back the price down a little, get us used to it, then we accept it. Then the price creeps up a little, no complaints. A little more, no complaints; continuous cycle until we moan/groan. Then the increases taper off and we are left with a high fuel cost without seeing the domino effect; useless you have are in transportation and being hit by the fuel costs. And when the price drops a little we brag about gets fuel cheap.

    Like when Katrina was being blamed for gas skyrocketing to $3 average for 87 octane. The funny thing is Katrina hit end of August; gas here in Chi-town was $3.09 (at a Citgo, not a major station here)the last week of July, a month b4!! BP, Shell and Mobil were higher, and the closer you got downtown the higher the price. Again, this was pre-Katrina! :confuse:

    I tracked the gas increases last summer. From Memorial Day weekend fuel was $1.87, by July 4th, $2.65; week before Katrina, $3.15; day after Katrina $3.25 in the morning, $3.70 that evening. Fuel went up steadily, with a few spikes here and there, at least once a week during that period.

    One kicker is that diesel is more than premium in most places here. And E85 is darn near non-existent, but it's a crap shoot due to its energy content and that you may end up paying more anyway in the long-run.

    The bad thing is the government announced last week we should get used to the high gas prices and to expect the lowest price to be $2.50/gal. for the coming months. And the next day, fuel shot up 20 cents and has gone up twice times since. :sick:

    Why not just save the trouble and tell the companies to stick it to consumers :cry:
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    Unleaded 87 octane $2.23 per gallon
    Premium 93 octane $2.64 per gallon
    Diesel $1.83 per gallon. Sounds like the oil companies are pocketing an extra buck in the USA on diesel sales. It would pay me to slip across the border with a couple 55 gallon drums and save a hundred bucks.

    PS
    I get my Hornitos Tequila cheaper there also...
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    How much is Gas in Mexico ?

    Rocky
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    I believe the Mexican government owns the gas stations. That keeps the price equal across the country. The only big difference I see is diesel is priced according to it's actual cost to produce and distribute. I cannot see how gouging for diesel will have anything but a negative affect on shipping in the USA. CA is already losing revenue because truckers are filling before they enter the state. Just as the USA is in a global economy, CA is in a national economy. Too bad the state legislature thinks we are above the fray.

    Mexican gas prices
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    So I take it the Mexicans travel by horse still ? Cuz how else could they afford it ?

    Rocky
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    I also believe it's nothing but gouging. Prices are pushed as high as possible until enough people b1tch about it, then they taper off until people get used to them. Then up they go again. We need someone the whitehouse with enough balls to stand up and do something about it instead of these guys who have their bank accounts padded by big oil companies.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    agree 100%

    Rocky
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,403
    I know some poeple keep pointing at the EVIL oil companies and the prices at the pump, but I still see the more direct connection with the futures markets. The market report on the mid-day news says oil is trading up, the price at the pump moves up. Prices do move down with the markets at a slower rate (another topic of discussion) but the commodity market seems to be the major factor. The oil companies themselves seem to be a much smaller factor.

    Certainly they MUST be a part of the equation, but to portray it that "big oil" is sitting there pushing up prices and seeing how much the public will tolerate is kind of silly if you just look at the way the commodity markets set pricing.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    Well Pf-flyer, perhaps it's time for caps ? The prices move up and down faster than the terror level after 9/11 :confuse:

    Rocky
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    Well Pf-flyer, perhaps it's time for caps ?

    Interesting you should bring that up. The governor of Hawaii (Republican) did just that over a year ago. Set the price cap at $2.07 per gallon. Soon the cost to the stations was more than the cap. So they could not buy the gas and closed a few stations. The cap was soon lifted and gas in Hawaii is now about $3.18 per gallon. You cannot control prices in a free market economy. Even in a Socialist system like Canada they have the same fluctuations we have. Plus they have more than enough oil for themselves and are our number one source at present. I think you should just feel fortunate that we still have some of the lowest gas prices in the world.

    I'm thankful I can afford gas for my vehicles. I am thankful I don't have to ride a moped to conserve on fuel.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganMember Posts: 13,994
    I find it sad that we aren't using the oil we got. We have butt loads of oil here in Texas. We could teach the arabs a lesson by increasing our production here. I guess they are charging as much as possible until we get our Ethanol up to full capacity.

    I'm not thankful, because we could be buying it cheaper. Last time I checked didn't we take over Iraq ? Gas should be .70 cents a gallon. :surprise:

    Rocky
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    Does it really matter how the price is pushed up when the bottom line is the consumer has to spend more of their money to get the same amount of gas while that extra money is going into the pockets of big oil companies?
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    The flaw in your statement is that energy commodities aren't part of the free market. When was the last time you could go to a discount gas station and buy gas $.50 cheaper a gallon than the other stations were selling it for?
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    When was the last time you could go to a discount gas station and buy gas $.50 cheaper a gallon than the other stations were selling it for?

    Today, I can buy gas from Costco for $2.41 per gallon and less than 2 miles away the Chevron is $2.94 for unleaded regular. Sure the independent mom & pop stations are all gone. Not from price fixing, from government regulations. How many small stations have you seen where the local government forced the little guy into bankruptcy with every regulation known to man. No small operator could afford the hundreds of thousands of dollars to dig up the old tanks, remediate the soil underneath and install all new modern equipment. That was the death knoll to mom & pop stations across the country. They were replaced by convenience store stations. Ask any operator where the profit is. They will tell you in selling water and sodas, not gasoline.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    No one has come up with an answer to my question. How is it that when oil was $10 barrel in 1998 we were paying $1.25 for gas? Now oil is $60 per barrel and we are only paying $2.50 per gallon.

    Either the price is being held artificially low today, or we were getting really screwed in 1998. Taxes are about the same today.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Member Posts: 72,587
    DC is $2.46, Potomac is $2.53-55.

    -juice
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    Then your area is the only area ever to see a difference in price like that. Any place I've ever been, and I've been in a lot of places, the price of gas between different gas stations is never more than a few pennies. I'm not referring to the mom and pop places, I'm referring to the free market. Here's an example. Two identical items can be bought from Sears and Wal-Mart. The item at Sears costs $10, while the same item only costs $7 at Wal-Mart. That's a difference of 30%. That's an example of the free market. You will never find price differences this wide for gas in any given area. That's because gas isn't isn't a free market good. It's price is strictly regulated because it comes from very, very few suppliers, and all the money goes into the same pockets. There is no competition in the energy markets therefore it's not a free market, it's a closed market.

    Also, if you take a look at gas prices vs crude oil prices, you'll notice that one goes up or down when the other does the same, however there's never been a definitive corralation between the two whaeras a person can say "if crude oil prices go up by X amount, then gasoline will increase by X amount. Don't ask me why because I can't explain it, I just know that's how it has worked.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    I would say your example is a poor one. If any company is playing unfair competition it is Wal_mart. Who can compete with them. If the oil companies were to do what WM does you would be screaming bloody murder.

    When I can go to 10 gas stations in a 2 mile radius and have a 53 cent per gallon difference I say there is competition. If we could supply all our own oil we might be able to control the price by legislation. Try passing a law that says we will only pay Canada $40 per barrel to keep the price of gas under $1.50 per gallon. The pipeline from Canada would be aimed toward another country before the ink dried from the President's signature. It is all part of a world market. If you want to bad mouth OPEC you might have a credible argument. They are squeezing the oil buyers of the World. Exxon is small potatoes compared to Saudi ARAMCO.

    check out the price spread in San Diego
    http://www.sandiegogasprices.com/
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    Your example of gas price differences is freakishly the exception, not the rule. In most cases, there are very little differences in price in any given local area. When did I bad mouth OPEC? And when I say big oil, I'm referring to all entities in control of energy commodities. Why would I scream about oil companies providing gas at the lowest possible price?
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    I'm not sure we are understanding each other here. I think you have every right to bad mouth OPEC. They do have control by how much they let out of the pipe. It is still the oil commodity traders that set the price.

    If the oil companies controlled the price of oil, it would never have dropped from the high prices in the 1970s. Working in the oil field it is interesting to watch BP scramble when the price goes up. They have rigs drilling all over the North Slope of Alaska. When the price dropped they shut down the rigs and they were stacked everywhere. If BP which is second in size to EXXON here in the USA, had the control you are saying they have, why the kneejerk reaction every time the price goes up? When the Alaska pipeline went into operation the price was $32 per barrel. They were pumping 2.1 million barrels a day. As the price dropped they cut back on production. Don't you think if they had control they would keep it flowing at the higher price? With the price at $60 per barrel it is busier than I have seen it in many years.
  • fred222fred222 Member Posts: 200
    gas is $2.24 at Costco. Upto $0.20/gallon more at other stations.
  • jae5jae5 Member Posts: 1,206
    Thanks, it's just my thought(and seemingly yours and Rocky's).

    And I do agree with flyer as well, everything is emotional right now and are playing off of that. Again, late last summer it was always because of Katrina that the prices went up. I thought it was funny when the reporters were saying that caused prices at the pump to go to $3; I was like "It's been over $3 for a month BEFORE Katrina!!" :mad:

    I guess now they've become bold and/or just ran out of excuses and raise prices because it's Tuesday, or the sun's not coming out today, or their favorite team got beat. And I think the same thing is going on with E85 as well. Diesel as well, as this used to always be cheaper than gasoline.

    I'm not sure in other places, but when that was happening here myself and others started reporting the stations, emailing, calling, mailing our local reps and complaining. They finally got off their duffs and followed up. Many stations were caught gouging consumers and fined.
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    Let me ask you this. Do you think if OPEC and every other oil producing entity were to produce crude at their absolute peak output, commodity traders would still be able to set the price wherever they wanted? Of course not. If the market was flooded with the product, the price would have to go down no matter what traders were doing. Big oil controls the price by controlling the amount of production, and because there are so few companies in charge of all energy resources, prices are strictly controlled so there is no competition in the market. The entire industry operates within a collusionary closed market. If you believe otherwise, you are illinformed.
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,403
    When prices were skyrocketing last year, it had NOTHING to do with the amount of oil being produced on a day to day basis. It was all about what the traders THOUGHT was going to happen. That doesn't sound like "collusion" to me. But that's just my two cents.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    If you believe otherwise, you are illinformed.

    Let me ask you this. Do you believe the Canadian, Mexican and Saudi governments are in collusion selling us oil? They are the 3 major sources of our imports. I don't think so.

    Good read on what is happening with oil, right from where are largest supply comes from.

    Take the prices of oil, the stock markets, precious metals and housing. All of these markets are overheated right now.

    And in each of those markets, folks are confusing the prices people are willing to pay right now with the true value of the commodity. They're saying it's different this time; here is where true value lies. Then, unfailingly, they subscribe to the "can't miss" theory. In other words, forget everything else, invest in this sector or that commodity and you will participate in wealth beyond your wildest dreams. They think it will never end.

    Sorry Bucky, but it doesn't work that way. History is still bound to repeat itself, even if not exactly in the way it previously unfolded. Here's the thing: all commodity markets are cyclical. They always have been and always will be. So this time it's not different. It's the same. And you probably already know that those who fail to heed the lessons of history are doomed to repeat them.

    Only a year or so ago, oil was almost 50% cheaper than it is today. Oil companies and exploration companies made money at that price, big money.

    The change comes from current perception caused by Middle East instability. What is the real value of oil? What is the real value of oil companies that find it, refine it, pump it and distribute it? It's a sure bet that real values don't reflect today's high prices and an even surer bet that those prices won't last.

    It's no stretch to believe that oil prices can drop by 50% in the future, however near or far off.


    oil prices
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    What are the odds of all these countries getting together and squeezing the USA. They are all greedy and would cut each others throats if possible to sell us oil. Even Venezuela that hates us are selling us major amounts of oil.

    crude oil imports in December 2005 has been released and it shows that two countries have exported more than 1.5 million barrels per day to the United States. Including those countries, a total of five countries exported over 1.0 million barrels per day of crude oil to the United States (see table below). The top sources of US crude oil imports for December were Canada (1.899 million barrels per day), Mexico (1.707 million barrels per day), Saudi Arabia (1.438 million barrels per day), Venezuela (1.183 million barrels per day), and Nigeria (1.174 million barrels per day). The rest of the top ten sources, in order, were Angola (0.425 million barrels per day), Iraq (0.390 million barrels per day), Ecuador (0.340 million barrels per day), Kuwait (0.268 million barrels per day), and Algeria (0.212 million barrels per day). Total crude oil imports averaged 9.988 million barrels per day in December, which is a decrease of 0.277 million barrels per day from November. The top five exporting countries accounted for 74 percent of United States crude oil imports in December and the top ten sources accounted for approximately 90 percent of all U.S. crude oil imports.

    Oil imports
  • fred222fred222 Member Posts: 200
    When prices were skyrocketing last year, it had NOTHING to do with the amount of oil being produced on a day to day basis
    I hate to disagree with the host, but you are only partially correct. We do not put oil in our cars, we put gas in them. The high prices after the hurricanes last year were partially due to reduced refinery capacity. Capitalism works. The price of gas went up so people used less so there were no real gas shortages.
    Jim Jubak on MSNBC recently wrote an article about the oil producers, Saudi Arabia for example, getting heavily into the refining business. The implication was that such countries may stop exporting crude oil and only export the value added refined products and then really control the world energy markets. I would if I was them. Americans really need to get out of their SUV's and Pick Up trucks as a Patriotic action. High energy prices are here to stay, and they will only get higher. I do not think that it is a good idea to send many many billions of dollars out of this country every year to buy oil that we do not really need if we just drove more effecient vehicles.
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Alamogordo, NMMember Posts: 7,615
    your words ring of truth. What's happening instead is that a lot(and I mean a lot)of Americans don't get it. They want to buy these huge pick-em-up trucks and mammoth SUV's, talk on their cellphones while driving (ususally about peripheral crap that doesn't add up to anything)and pollute our environment. They feel that the ecosystem will fulfill all of our needs and magically clean up everything. Well, the ecosystem will do wonders(controlled by the Big Guy upstairs)but we should still be thinking beyond having God step in and tidy up after us.

    Global warming is real, it is happening and we need to get out of the huge pick-em-up trucks and SUV's.

    Everyone can go ahead and do what they want, but if the above post is true(and that might really come to pass I think)then do you all think that the Saudi's are going to charge us soft and fluffy prices per gallon. Say the gas comes imported to us from them all refined at $3.55/gal for 87 no-lead. Is that acceptable to you?

    Of course we get most of our crude oil from Canada so as long as we keep our refineries from catching on fire and all copasetic we should be OK. I just think that it is more forward-thinking than not to get out of the huge pickup trucks and SUV's. Y'all agree, or nay?

    Besides that they're ugly and take up too much parking space. It's all South Korean in automobiles, my friends. The Americans are coming to the Ball too late and are paying the price for it, now.

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    Remember, it's a world market. All of the oil producers collude to keep prices high, but it isn't just to squeeze the U.S., they're putting the squeeze on everyone. They don't care where the money comes from, just as long as it keeps rolling in.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    All of the oil producers collude to keep prices high

    Where I disagree is with your assessment of collusion. You seem to think that Canada & Mexico are sitting down with OPEC to fix prices. I don't believe it would be feasible. For one thing Opec is an alliance of countries that can hardly get along with each other. Then try to throw some independent country like Canada or Mexico into the mix. When the dust settles and oil is plentiful the producers will cut each others throat to get your petro dollar. Even if it is back down to $20 per barrel or less. Remember they were making money in 1998 at $10 per barrel.
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,403
    We had a 6 cent jump at the pump this afternoon to $2.35 for 87 here in State College, PA.

    Must be some late winter storm headed our way that I don't know about :P
  • harrycheztharrychezt Member Posts: 405
    Gas was 1.99-2.01 in places here 10 days ago, about beginning of March. Now? 2.33 to 2.53, for regular unleaded.
    About 10 dollars per barrel back in 1998: If only I had 10,000 dollars back then to invest! ;)
    What is kind odd is now people are calling 2.00 "a good deal", comapred to 1 year ago, when gas went about 2.19 per gallon one week, then dropped down to about 1.79 Even could get it for a short period, I think , for 1.59.
    When it hit 3.19-3.32 or so last year, and now "a relatively inexpensive 2.00" :confuse:
    Right!
    Next car will get minimum 30MPG hwy, or we ain't buying.
  • bottgersbottgers Member Posts: 2,030
    It's simple economics. Countries don't have to be able to sit down with each other or even be friendly to collude. If they want a higher price, they simply provide less of the product, whether it means actually providing less of the product, or creating news of tight supplies. Either way, it has the same effect.
  • gagricegagrice Pahrump, NevadaMember Posts: 31,450
    OH, I get it. Kind of like Toyota dribbling out the Prius to keep the prices up.
This discussion has been closed.