GS27 scratch remover

bdstriebdstrie Member Posts: 18
Wondering if anyone's used GS27 "as seen on TV" to
remove small scratches in clear coat. I'm
interested in any experiences/comments you may
have. THANKS!

Comments

  • GATESRGATESR Member Posts: 13
    Remember, every time you remove a scratch, you remove some of the clear coat and/or paint. I try to buff out scratches by applying a good cleaner paste wax a number of times, and let it go at that.
  • my501bluesmy501blues Member Posts: 1
    I know it's been a while since you've posted, but if you haven't bought the stuff yet, everything I've heard is....DON'T!!!

    I stoped at a Pep Boys parts store looking for something to cover some scratches, spoke with a worker there that said although he hasn't used the stuff himself, every tube that he's sold (which ammounted to about 5) had been returned cause it didn't work. Considering it's like $10 a bottle, I wouldn't even bother.
  • drscopemdrscopem Member Posts: 83
    Hi:
    There are 2 types of scratches - those that your fingernail doesn't get stuck in and those that it catches in. If your fingernail gets caught, then it is a deep scratch and I would treat it like a paint chip. If your fingernail doesn't get caught then I would buff it with 3M Imperial Hand Glaze a few times until it is gone or less noticeable.
    Good luck.
  • wc3georgewc3george Member Posts: 23
    I'll keep this short -- this garbage does not work. Period. And it looked so good on TV - how could this happen? :)
  • bdstriebdstrie Member Posts: 18
    Hey thanks everybody. I'm getting ready to trade, and thought this stuff might be 'too good to be true', so I appreciate your honest opinions!!
  • rparkrpark Member Posts: 14
    There is no miracle cream.
    My strategy:
    Claying the car cleans the paint very well and quickly, with little or no abrasion. For scratches, I use clearcoat polising compund, a cordless drill (slow enough to avoid burning the paint)with a 5" diameter, 2" thick foam applicator, and buff, buff, buff. Then, I use a polishing compound (Meguiars, etc) and buff again (clean pad). Then Carauba wax by hand. This smoothes the clearcoat, so the scatch isn't white anymore (it's still there, though, just smooth. You can see it in the right light, at an angle). Figure about 15 minutes per scratch.
    And, as above, if it's a deep scratch, touch up. But, I use a very fine artist's paint brush (about $3 or more), as it gives better control. And I use it for only 1 session.
  • lannyclannyc Member Posts: 5
    It sounded so good on TV, I bought a tube and its a $7 ripoff. Don't waste your money.
  • Daniel13Daniel13 Member Posts: 3
    I bought a it some months ago with a great deal
    of reservations. I used it once with good
    results; it covered the surface scratch. Still
    dont have much faith in anything they show on tv
    but, on the other hand, it hurts my heart to see
    scratches on my one year old MPV. Never got
    used to put up with scratches or rationalize
    about them. I really hate to have to be ripped
    off by a bodyshop in fixing it. So there is no
    solution to the problem, just suffer.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonMember Posts: 20,350
    The body shops aren't ripping you off! They are simply charging you the competitive rate to fix the scratch the right way.

    But, if some magic cream will do the same thing, go for it!
  • kn7kn7 Member Posts: 2
    I bought it and I agree it doesn't work worth a damn on my car either... but I had a nasty scratch on my Seadoo and decided to try it and it worked great. So now I just use it on my boat
  • theparallaxtheparallax Member Posts: 361
    Notice they NEVER touch the scratch before why wipe their 'Magic Cream' on the scratch? I believe all they do is draw a white line on the car and say it's a scratch.
  • tomcat99tomcat99 Member Posts: 8
    GS27 doesn't work...Don't bother trying to use it. Think about it, if it's that good, why would the body shop still be in business and the product be sold nationally? And please don't ever buy any product sold exclusive on TV...BS
  • fk2000tlfk2000tl Member Posts: 1
    Exactly. The product just does not work.
  • sosterhubersosterhuber Member Posts: 5
    They should call this "BS27". Years ago I used to use Brasso to remove stains and small "rubs" that left behind rubber marks, etc. This works (and smells the same!) Don't waste your money.
  • floyd8floyd8 Member Posts: 1
    GS27 is the biggest most blatant ripoff of the past millenium. I used it on my Lexus SC400 hood and thought I was going to go kill someone when I saw the hazy scratches it left over the small scratch I was attempting to remove. Don't waste your time nor money. Anyone out there interested in a class action suit?
  • pjyoungpjyoung Member Posts: 885
    On a red 93 T'bird and a White 99 Chrysler 300M. The "scratches" were just surface scratches, nothing major, but they did come out. Deep scratches, no, it didn't work
  • alexoalexo Member Posts: 2
    on light surface scratches it worked great.
  • tjk4tjk4 Member Posts: 4
    ... :( was not impressed on either light or dark paint (2 cars-both with superficial scratches). --$24.95 wasted.....tom
  • insc007insc007 Member Posts: 3
    I received a tube of this stuff and used with some success on my old pontiac with an enamel paint job...no luck at all on my 91 cougar with clear coat.
    this is still a waste of money though...there are rubbing compounds that work just as good...i still haven't found any "miracle" compound for clearcoat scratches.
  • toad10toad10 Member Posts: 12
    I also agree GS27 doesn't work. The only stuff I use is called Safe Cut by the Wax Shop. It works fairly well on light scratches but deeper ones need professional help or just live with it.
  • tomsrtomsr Member Posts: 325
    I didn't buy it but my son who is gullible did.
    It is useless in my humble opinion.Just goes to
    show you that 90% of what you hear on TV is lies.
    If they ever pass a law against deception on TV
    every tube in the country will go black.
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