Fuel Economy Update for July - 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel Long-Term Road Test

Edmunds.comEdmunds.com Member, Administrator, Moderator Posts: 10,145
edited December 2014 in Ram
imageFuel Economy Update for July - 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel Long-Term Road Test

This update to Edmunds long-term 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel includes a running fuel economy through July 2014, including a recent 3,000-mile road trip.

Read the full story here


Comments

  • bankerdannybankerdanny Member Posts: 1,021

    Josh, you and I have different definitions of slight. Your consumption rate for the diesel additive is over 50% higher than predicted: 1.28 gallons per 1,000 miles actual vs .8 gallons expected. The actual amount of fluid is small, but still that large an experience variance from the expected norm should be investigated.

  • grijongrijon Member Posts: 147

    Absolutely with bankerdanny - there would be full-blown meltdowns with screaming and tears if it were only returning 15 MPG for fuel economy...

  • handbrakehandbrake Member Posts: 99

    Thank you for doing this test, Edmunds. I'm rapidly realizing that my 2009 F150 is just fine...with a 36 gallon tank my highway range is well over 700 miles and I can get 20 MPG on a pure highway trip (5.4 with 6 speed auto and 4x4). Regular unleaded is a lot cheaper than diesel in my neck of the woods and that additional $10 per tank and a half for the additive sure doesn't help the diesel equation. So far, I'm seeing no benefit to the diesel Ram.

  • handbrakehandbrake Member Posts: 99

    Thank you for doing this test, Edmunds. I'm rapidly realizing that my 2009 F150 is just fine...with a 36 gallon tank my highway range is well over 700 miles and I can get 20 MPG on a pure highway trip (5.4 with 6 speed auto and 4x4). Regular unleaded is a lot cheaper than diesel in my neck of the woods and that additional $10 per tank and a half for the additive sure doesn't help the diesel equation. So far, I'm seeing no benefit to the diesel Ram.

  • jkavanaghjkavanagh Member Posts: 26

    False equivalency, grijon. Your 15 mpg example would have significant cost consequences. On the other hand, the rate of DEF consumption observed compared the "normal" consumption quoted by Ram amounts to roughly four additional bucks over 10,000 miles.

  • misterfusionmisterfusion Member Posts: 471

    I think the real value of the Ecodiesel (relative to other trucks) is realized in its higher city/combined economy.

  • mtb1kemtb1ke Member Posts: 1

    Assuming pickup owners keep their trucks for 100,000 miles.... diesel is $4.39 a gallon, and regular is $4.09, and you go through the additive as frequent as Edmunds... at a price of $8/gallon... AND the Silverado Edmunds is driving has gotten 17.4 mpg and the Ram 22.... You save about 3 grand in fuel. Lots of assumptions... none of which based on what OTHER people get in their trucks in their location... so the only items in common - the driver(s) of the trucks and the area they are being driven in. Initial upcharge for the diesel engine- however the resale value should be higher as well... if you happen to live in an area where diesel is cheaper - no brainer.

  • grijongrijon Member Posts: 147
    edited August 2014

    @jkavanagh said:
    False equivalency, grijon. Your 15 mpg example would have significant cost consequences. On the other hand, the rate of DEF consumption observed compared the "normal" consumption quoted by Ram amounts to roughly four additional bucks over 10,000 miles.

    What you say regarding cost is well said and absolutely true, jkayanagh; how do you feel about the inaccurate estimation, though?

  • yellowbalyellowbal Member Posts: 234

    @grijon said:
    What you say regarding cost is well said and absolutely true, jkayanagh; how do you feel about the inaccurate estimation, though?

    Estimates are just good guesses. The actual number will always vary. MPG, tire life, oil change intervals etc will always vary depending on how the vehicle is used. Diesel fluid seems to be the same way.

  • mcheathmcheath Member Posts: 13

    Interesting. I bought a Ram 1500 in May and traveled almost the same route in June. (I went from central California to Northeast Montana and back)

    My pickup is a Tradesman 2wd single cab short bed with the 3.6 gas engine. 17 inch aluminum wheels as well. Weighs in at a bit over 4600 lbs. Paid 22.5k out the door.

    On the way North we towed a full 5x8 U Haul, and were empty except for luggage on the way home.

    On the way North I averaged 21.3mpg. On the way South it was 29.4mpg averaged. Range on the way home was over 700 miles per tank on the 26 gallon tank.

    Now I drive like an old man, never went over 60 towing going north and 70 was my high on the way home. I accelerate gently and even slow down five mph in a hard headwind. (Which there is plenty of up north)

    I'm not a typical driver of course, but my experience shows what the 3.6 Ram is capable of.

  • grijongrijon Member Posts: 147

    @yellowbal, I have to disagree; estimates are not supposed to be guesses, they're supposed to be predictions based on experience. To be wrong by 50% shows either unusual circumstances or poor (failed!) estimation.

    I agree that $4 over 10,000 miles is negligible - you'll spend more on washer fluid in that time! But I find this sort of inaccuracy disappointing in a modern auto manufacturer and that what's I'm trying to express.

    I'll say again, though, that for all we know there is a leak in the DEF system somewhere - we don't know if this rate of consumption will continue, nor do we know if this is typical of the rest of the Ram diesels on the road.

  • piredonpiredon Member Posts: 50

    I'm surprised by the DEF. I had a 2011 BMW X5 with a 6.1 gallon capacity, and it would easily go 10,000 miles between fill-ups and I usually got 11,000. I got slightly better overall economy (25 mpg versus your 22-23), but you're burning through twice as much DEF. The good news is it's cheap and readily available. This was NOT the case back in 2011. None of the auto part stores carried it and the dealer price was outrageous (I think it was $25-30 per gallon).

    I currently have a 535d BTW. Apparently I'm addicted to diesel.

  • kirkhilles1kirkhilles1 Member Posts: 863

    Until you get to the root cause of the massive DEF usage (maybe it'll slow down over time), maybe you should look on Amazon. They have the 2.5 Gallon BlueDEF jug for $11.97 which works out to $4.79 a gallon with Free Prime Shipping.

  • ir0nhead3ir0nhead3 Member Posts: 1

    Not sure why the difference but I am getting 29MPG or better on the highway. Have a 2014 Big Horn 4x2 crew cab and loving it. City is around 21 MPG, but still better than highway best in my old 2004 F150 4.2L V6. No regrets in my purchase. And, it rides like a luxury SUV to boot. I say take a test drive for yourself before you dis-regard one of the first light duty diesel trucks, actually the first I am aware of with this HP and torque. It has 20% more HP, and double the torque of my F150. That's my 2 cents.

  • mcesareymcesarey Member Posts: 11

    I believe the 80mph freeway through multiple states hurt the fuel economy a good bit. I'd like to see at what speed and to what magnitude fuel economy drops off in a vehicle like this. I would think that above 60-65mph fuel economy would start to drop, and above 70-75 would drop sharply.

  • mcheathmcheath Member Posts: 13

    My pickup loses fuel economy drastically at high speed. At a sustained 80mph my truck indicates a loss of 7 to 9 mpg from what I get at 65. I'd assume the 3.0 diesel is the same. My experience with the gas 3.6 is that it's very sensitive to driving style. It can give fabulous mileage but if you drive it aggressively it's right down there in the mid teens in town and not a lot better on the freeway. Edmunds people seem to have heavy right feet.

  • allthingshondaallthingshonda Member Posts: 878

    I don't think the amount of DEF used should be considered abnormal but a sign the Chrysler didn't do a lot of real world testing with this engine in the Ram. They have been using this engine in the Grand Cherokee for a while and probably calculated DEF use based on the rate it's used in the GC. I'm sure the DEF tank capacity will be increased in future Rams.

  • hybrishybris Member Posts: 365

    Just poking around but it seems a lot of Cummins 6.7 diesel owners are seeing noticeable mileage gains from removing the EGR and DEF systems. While this motor is too new for the aftermarket to have come up with the deletes and you guys live in one of the worst states for emissions enforcement, I do wonder just what could this motor be capable of if you remove all the junk systems on it and let it breathe and run.

  • wilky323wilky323 Member Posts: 3

    There are a lot of factors to DEF usage. Many of which are not known to the general public due to the fact that it is a relatively new maintenance item. I have extensive experience dealing with DEF in medium and heavy duty diesel applications and there are two major factors that will cause DEF usage to go up, that is idle time and the quality of the DEF. A Cummins 6.7L engine should operate at a ratio of DEF to fuel at 5%. So 5 gallons of DEF to 100 gallons of fuel. We've seen that ratio go up as high as 15% with excessive idle time, due to the nature of the DEF system. The emission system is less efficient at idle, therefore it requires more DEF to be dosed into the exhaust to meet EPA emission requirements. The second factor, DEF quality has to do with the age of DEF and how it was stored. DEF will start to degrade after about a year, or if it is stored improperly(high temperatures). DEF that is old or has been stored improperly will be dosed at a higher rate because it has started to break down and is not as effective at controlling Nox levels.

  • texasestexases Member Posts: 9,754

    @hybris - it's hard for me to come up with a WORSE idea than removing the pollution controls on a diesel. The only way they can meet regs is with the controls. Particulates are the worst pollutants out there, and are associated with major health problems. Just a BAD IDEA!

  • 4x4editor4x4editor Member Posts: 0

    I have been testing a '15 Ram 1500 Big Horn 4x4 Crew Cab diesel as well here in Oregon. Highway fuel economy drops significantly above 70mph. Fuel economy between 65-70mph on rolling interstate stays between 28-30mpg. City driving it's in the 21-23mpg range, and towing a 4,000-pound enclosed box trailer drops it to 14 over varied terrain. Like any other engine, the fuel economy one sees is very dependent on the heaviness of one's right foot. The beauty of the diesel is it's low- to mid-range torque and ability to move the truck with light throttle. When you need the pulling power of a Hemi, the V-6 EcoDiesel does so with ease.

  • columnshiftcolumnshift Member Posts: 8
    edited December 2014
    handbrake said:

    Thank you for doing this test, Edmunds. I'm rapidly realizing that my 2009 F150 is just fine...with a 36 gallon tank my highway range is well over 700 miles and I can get 20 MPG on a pure highway trip (5.4 with 6 speed auto and 4x4). Regular unleaded is a lot cheaper than diesel in my neck of the woods and that additional $10 per tank and a half for the additive sure doesn't help the diesel equation. So far, I'm seeing no benefit to the diesel Ram.

    i agree when diesel is 90cents more and the additive my friend bought was $11 a gallon and they put the water filter under the vehicle i'd like edmunds to run the cost per mile at each fillup including all fuel costs, and compare to new f150 2.7 ecoboost cost per mile

    seems you have to pay a bunch for that mileage.

    but if you tow a bunch then diesel has always been a top choice

    i see many trucks empty and many are bought by companies in 2wd for ease of carrying stuff and rough environments

    but i'd still like a cost per mile as fuel costs
Sign In or Register to comment.