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Inconsiderate Drivers (share your stories, etc.)

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  • Steve EliasSteve Elias Posts: 2,207

    with lots of exits & blind entrances in urban area, of course it makes sense to stay in middle lane. the law is to drive in rightmost lane available safely, not to do so when it's unsafe!

    i did a bunch of of 3-lane intersate driving yesterday. 99% right & middle lane.
    I prefer to wait longer behind the middle lane campers and then pass them on the right, leaving left lane for the tailgators. Especially when a road is very busy.

    interesting point euphonium re I-5 and the semis in left lane. (semis are prohibited from left lane on most east coast highways.)

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 28,813

    Same perfect driving conditions here this morning and yet, on one of the straightest, smoothest roads in the state, 6 cars managed to collide in 1 accident. I don't know the details, but stupidity was obviously the cause.

    '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 53-car history and counting!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649
    edited May 2014

    Out this morning - saw a Lexus ES try to exit a gas station where there wasn't an exit, the car crashed to the ground with a horrible crunch. Then saw a Cruze try to round a corner, cut it close, hopped the sidewalk. Then got behind a 94-95 E320 that was going slow, "driver" holding phone - when he started to turn at 3mph, I hit the horn. Then at Costco, a headscarf wearer in an Odyssey who was treating the parking lot like a road and being a bit too speedy and aggressive - funny as that wonderful demographic usually panics and freezes up when other cars are near. Finished it off with a middle aged woman in a Sonic who dawdled on a free turn, then once on the road went about helf the speed limit, weaving between lanes. When I went by I tooted the horn, she gave me the finger, I laid on the horn - she then went so slow that she eventually vanished, and I wasn't going above the limit. Nice to see the "discretion" being used by our brave warrior class in fighting distracted driving.

  • jjackson12jjackson12 Posts: 46

    I got beeped at yesterday, a good 2 or 3 second blast.

    It seems I was inconsiderate when I stopped to allow a middle aged guy pushing a wheelchair across the perimeter road of a parking lot. Mother's Day, the restaurant was packed and many were forced to park in the grocery store lot. Upon leaving the parking lot, I got flipped off while our impatient driver raced down the road to get back on schedule.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,946

    You have a lot of gall stopping for a guy in a wheelchair! Next time just run over him... "decrease the surplus population"! You don't want those Very Important People in the vehicles behind you to have to wait a few seconds--their time is valuable!!

    ;)

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,497

    Yeah, that's just unconscionable, Jackson! :p

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 12,326

    @imidazol97 said:
    If there are 3 or more lanes, I drive in whichever lane suits me best. I read both links in Steve's post as to opinions from people in driving training companies, but I'm not impressed.

    What does it take to impress you?

    What I see if the same as the group that thinks everyone should be out of their way so they can travel in whichever lane however fast they choose to travel, usually over the speed limit. The group is wanting to tell everyone else how to drive and where to drive without taking on responsibility and accountability for their own actions.

    All drivers essentially choose to drive however fast or slow they want to given they aren't impeded or pushed by others. The speed limit has nothing to do with how fast most drivers drive, unless a cop or enforcement is regularly visible. Do they not take responsibility for their own actions by purchasing their car, insurance, liability insurance, ect? Assuming they are an upstanding legal driver with a legal driver's license and adequate insurance, it seems to me they are taking responsibility for their own actions.

    I drove to Columbus and back for lunch with our son. 3 lanes. I was in the middle or right lane and below the speed limit of 70/70 which is too fast. Heavy rain showers in places and some people wouldn't slow down especially in the left of 3 lanes. It could have been a glacier oozing over the interstate due to global cooling and they wouldn't have slowed down. Others did.

    Some of those cars may have high capabilities and brand new tires with deep tread and high quality wet performance. Rain in those conditions doesn't do much to hamper the vehicle's safe travel of speed. However, there are many driving a 3 ton SUV with old balding tires in the rain that should be slowing down far more than they do.

    '15 Audi S4 quattro AWD Prestige, '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD 2.0T, Wife's '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD 2.0T
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Out on foot today - noticed a distinct lack of signals. Must be more of the thread of "discretion" in action. Best phone fiddlers - woman in an R-class dawdling on green - I was able to shout "hang up" from the curb, another woman in an Accord doing similar, she then pulled out directly in front of oncoming traffic and got a nice long honk. And the best was what I am pretty sure was a woman holding a phone to her ear, cop on traffic duty at a construction site (I hope the inherited empire developer has to pay for this) just shakes his head and points - I suppose he couldn't do much on foot. Takes a lot of gall to approach a cop while driving with a phone to your ear - unless you know nothing will be done, or are simply oblivious.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,946

    Observed inconsiderate--also dangerous--driving by a motorcycle rider today during morning rush hour. I was in a dedicated right turn lane, waiting for a procession of cars driving down the right lane of the other road. To complicate things, there's a cross road a couple hundred feet up and many of these oncoming cars are turning right onto that road, while I need to merge left to get out of the dedicated right turn lane. So I wait patiently. Then out of the corner of my eye I see a blur--a motorcycle has squeezed past me on my right, using that "imaginary lane" some people like to use, and is attempting to squeeze in ahead of me. Good thing I saw him before I moved forward. Motorcycles are entitled to the same rights and privileges as any other motor vehicle, but they need to follow traffic laws too.

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,345

    Another red light runner yesterday! That makes THREE I've seen in the past couple of weeks!

  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 4,098

    @backy said:
    Observed inconsiderate--also dangerous--driving by a motorcycle rider today during morning rush hour. I was in a dedicated right turn lane, waiting for a procession of cars driving down the right lane of the other road. To complicate things, there's a cross road a couple hundred feet up and many of these oncoming cars are turning right onto that road, while I need to merge left to get out of the dedicated right turn lane. So I wait patiently. Then out of the corner of my eye I see a blur--a motorcycle has squeezed past me on my right, using that "imaginary lane" some people like to use, and is attempting to squeeze in ahead of me. Good thing I saw him before I moved forward. Motorcycles are entitled to the same rights and privileges as any other motor vehicle, but they need to follow traffic laws too.

    Not sure of the rules in your state, but here in CA the law specifically allows Motorcycles to do exactly that, provided it is safe. They can pass inside the lanes. Technically they are not supposed to do it at speed, but they still do it on the freeways as well. Considering how dangerous it is to drive a motorcycle in LA, I suppose they deserve some kind of additional benefit (if that is what one could call it).

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,482

    But passing on the right on a motorcycle in a dedicated right turn lane is just plain dumb. I rode big bikes for over 20 years and I didn't survive by doing stuff like that!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649
    edited May 2014

    Yeah, there's a time and place for lane splitting - I don't know if that was it.

    Lane splitting can be a dramatic subject. I don't think I want to see it around Seattle - the ordinary driver simply isn't attentive enough.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425

    When observing a lane splitter coming from the rear, just energize your turn signal toward the lane he is splitting.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,497

    I had a guy on a Harley "split lanes" on me once as I was driving my old '69 pickup with about 9,000 #s on a trailer and approaching a red traffic light. I was going about 20-25 mph and had already timed the slowing vs. distance available. But, no, here comes this yahoo on the bike squeezing between me and a semi on the left. He then promptly dodges back into the right lane (in front of me) and stops. Well, I laid on that truck's brakes for all they had (drum brakes on all wheels fade rapidly under pressure) and managed to stop about 6" shy of biker paste.

    Honestly, had I not been driving a vehicle so dear to me, I may not have been able to stop in time. I suspect that even a small bump from behind could be memorable for a biker not wearing a helmet. But, hey, at least the guy ended up one vehicle ahead on the road; he was able to carry on in his blissful ignorance of that brush with injury.

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Lane splitting is legal in more developed countries, and strangely enough, California. Making abrupt maneuvers to block a legal splitter in such places might be a poor choice, as many motorcycle riders use cameras now. However, I think most people who are actually observant wouldn't be the problem, it'd be those who have poor situational awareness to begin with. I wouldn't want to split lanes with a Bellevue Range Rover on one side of me and a Kirkland X5 on the other.

    Dumb Harley rider also wasn't wearing a helmet? Shocking! That scene would have been a hot knife through butter.

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,482

    Oh, didn't you know that helmets are dangerous because it restricts vision and hearing? And that "loud pipes save lives"? For more ding-dong reasoning, consult your local headless neighbor.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649
    edited May 2014

    I saw a good one - maybe a shirt or sticker that said something like "If loud pipes save lives, imagine what you could do if you learned to ride that thing".

    More of that "discretion" at work, perhaps - is anything less considerate? I guess it's par for the course in what is getting dangerously close to an oligocracy in its belle epoque, the golden rule.

    Tonight's fun ones - dumb taxi drivers. I won't elaborate.

  • Steve EliasSteve Elias Posts: 2,207

    @euphonium said:
    When observing a lane splitter coming from the rear, just energize your turn signal toward the lane he is splitting.

    Darwin award nomination to anyone who tries that..

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,482

    7 DUIs? Why doesn't the DA tear up his license before he kills someone?

    Having ridden motorcycles myself for so long, I'm never aggressive with them no matter how vile their behavior toward me---I figure that with a really bad attitude on a motorcycle, there is no way that driver is going to avoid surgery and dental work in the near future. A person simply cannot tweak the nose of Mr. Death day after day and expect things to work out in their favor.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Money talks, something else walks.

    About being aggressive, not to mention, avoiding the civil and/or criminal proceedings likely to come if one changes their personality from passive to aggressive (as so many do in WA) and injures someone. Dash and helmet cams are growing at a huge rate, and if you're caught on camera, you might be paying for your jerkiness for a very long time. Hitting the signal won't save you, prepare to be sued and to lose a lot.

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 12,326

    What if driver assistance optional features of late sounded loud horns in the direction of the offending object instead of blinking lights at you on your dash or side mirror?

    I can understand some reasoning behind wanting loud exhaust to make sure if they don't see you, they can hear you. Some people are blind on the road.

    '15 Audi S4 quattro AWD Prestige, '16 Audi TTS quattro AWD 2.0T, Wife's '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD 2.0T
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Modern cocoon Camrys and crossovers muffle that noise. Loud pipes types generally aren't the best trained riders, from my experience.

    Today's winner was a new 2014 style 911 turbo, I believe with "Army reserve" (I doubt you have to be a member to have them - probably a good way to encourage "discretion" by the Praetorian class) special plates and a license plate frame from a local high end shop that does a lot of electronics etc. Weaving in and out of traffic, going maybe double the limit, not signaling - the whole shebang. I suppose when you know you'll never pay the price, might as well have fun.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,826

    Well, you do know all they need do is flash the badge. Diplomatic Immunity is KQQL too. :D

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    I remember ages ago, driving on I5 near the Canadian border, and being passed by a then current MB C140 (big coupe) that was probably going 100++. I spotted that it had diplomatic plates. There's a community that produces very little of value, and creates huge expense and corruption.

    Nothing too dumb on the road today - worst were a few oblivious slowpokes, and the lack of signal use was irritating. For a time I was dreaming of a world devoid of CUVs, Camrys, Prius, and Corollas. I didn't honk once, I kept it under control. America!

  • Sandman6472Sandman6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 5,605

    Personally, my CUV is the perfect mode of transport for my current situation and am very happy with it. A shame the mileage figures couldn't be about 25% better, but that's part of the whole package when purchasing such a vehicle...am sure most SUV's are even worse! But right now, this vehicle works for me and after driving my kid's sub compact the last few days, I know I made the right decision here!

    The Sandman :)B)

    2015 Audi A3 (wife) / 2015 Golf TSI (me) / 2019 Chevrolet Cruze Premier RS (daughter #1) / 2020 Hyundai Accent SE (daughter #2)

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,482
    edited May 2014

    You can't hear "loud pipes" if they are behind you on a freeway. The best defense for a motorcycle is a) a very bright headlight and b) not to be an idiot. It doesn't matter whether one is right or wrong in a bike-car confrontation. The bike always loses. I am amazed how thoroughly bad many motorcycles riders are. They don't know what they're doing, but they think they do.

    My favorite bike gripe is the one where you see a bike gaining on you at a rapid pace, well above freeway speed limits. So you signal to let them pass but they swerve to pass you on the right WITHOUT any signal.

    Death wish.

    And don't get me started on "gorilla bars" vs. bike control.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,497

    Oh, my.... I nearly spaced the sharing of a real gem from Saturday!

    So, I decided to do a little community service with my children after we participated in the "Heartwalk" Saturday morning. We ran an errand or two after that morning event, then headed home to grab the ATV trailer (little 8x8 tilt bed) so that we could pick up some piles of rubbish collected by another group of volunteers a couple weeks prior on a large empty lot in the town's shopping district.

    This all starts out rather blase. We stopped at the site and initially loaded a large contingent of errant shopping carts onto the trailer to deliver them back to their home stores (some of which were a mile+ away!). After loading up and heading out, I had to laugh at all the looks from people not quite sure what they were seeing as this little raspberry Fiesta made its way down the road with a trailer full of shopping carts! But, we dropped them off at all their stores without incident.

    Then, we head back to the site and do a little off-roading to get to the site of the pile of trash bags left by this group (apparently with the intention that somebody else, presumably scheduled, would pick them up? I didn't want to wait for the next wind storm to come along and spread all this work out across the property again). We loaded it all up, including a mangled shopping cart, bike frame, and other oddities. I put the cargo net and some straps over it all so we could safely drive a few miles away to the transfer site.

    Still, everything is going very smoothly and drama-free. Then, as we near our destination, we have to make two usually-simple turns. The first is a left turn from a four-lane divided highway onto a four-lane undivided feeder road, and the second is a near-immediate (about 100' from the intersection) right onto a two-lane frontage road. As we drove in the left lane of the divided highway toward the left turn lane, I can see a white gen 1 Subaru Forester behind us, literally riding our tail - I mean like tap-the-brakes-and-it-bumps-us close. I didn't think too much of it.

    We get to the left lanes and take the right one because we are making this immediate right to the frontage road. The Forester stays behind us. On green, we make the turn and signal to turn onto the frontage road along with two vehicles ahead of us. At this point, the Forester drives off into the sandy shoulder, kicking up all sorts of dust, and nearly loses control of his car as he drops into the ditch and launches (yes, the front of this guy's car left the ground) out of it onto the frontage road right where I would have been after making the turn had I not slammed on the brakes (which I nearly didn't do until all the dust caught my eye and I realized what was happening).

    Now, there isn't a clear roadway ahead. There are two cars ahead of the Forester (who is now ahead of me) and several cars coming the other direction. A little confused as to what was so urgent, I made the universal sign for "huh?" as the car straightened out in front of me, at which point the passenger discreetly offered up an apologetic wave (as if to say, "Sorry! But, hey, at least you don't have to ride with this maniac!"). Thankfully, nobody was hurt and the guy didn't pull into the transfer site just ahead, so I was able to simply move on with my day and chalk that one up as an "idiots will be idiots" move.

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425

    Around here, the grocers pay $2.00 a buggy that is collected & returned to the store. The grocers are Safeway and Fred Meyer. A local retired teacher is usually the collector with his PU, knowing where most of the abandoned buggies will be.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,497

    Wow. I am not sure that would fly in these parts. You would get drifters taking them away only to bring them back a few days later requesting their reward!

    I think we returned about fifteen of them, mostly Safeway, but with a couple from Sam's Club and one from Michael's for good measure.

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    If I had a store, I think I'd ban people who leave their carts in the middle of the lot rather than returning them to the collection points. One offense, and you're done. There's really no excuse. I am sure removing a cart is actually considered theft, but isn't enforced.

    This morning featured the usual score of people holding a phone and texting/talking while "driving". It also seems the amount of PSAs on TV for distracted driving has vanished. Why can't this be enforced with an unmarked car and a decent quality dashcam? I saw at least 3 LEOs just kind of hanging around (not in a vehicle or on a bike, chatting) at construction sites - I hope the well connected pseudo-private sector contractor/inherited empire property developer pays for that, and not the taxpayer.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425

    @xwesx said:
    Wow. I am not sure that would fly in these parts. You would get drifters taking them away only to bring them back a few days later requesting their reward!

    I think we returned about fifteen of them, mostly Safeway, but with a couple from Sam's Club and one from Michael's for good measure.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425

    Safeway & Freddies only pay their single contract cart chaser the $2.00, thus preventing the drifter trying to claim their reward.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 14,497

    @euphonium said:
    Safeway & Freddies only pay their single contract cart chaser the $2.00, thus preventing the drifter trying to claim their reward.

    Oh, gotcha. That makes more sense. So, the contractor gets $2/cart and pays the drifters $0.50 per cart to help send them astray. :p

    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 25,403

    In a 45 zone on a main road, a silver Prius pulls out instead of waiting in the driveway to a residence. I was close enough he should have waited. Then putts along without speeding up quickly. I flashed my brights at him so he procedes to slow down quickly from his 30 mph instead of accelerating.

    Then he turns left off the road into a small side road with lots of residences. I'll have to look for his car to see if he lives at the first house or lives down the side street.

    2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT, 2015 Cruze 2LT,

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649
    edited May 2014

    Not too bad today - was going ~50 in the right lane of a 40, being tailgated by a rented Optima - driver had a tight two handed death grip at 1130-1230, odd driving style. I am guessing maybe from NJ or MA. I turned off the road before anything happened, amused me more than annoyed me, because of the tense driving style. Also saw a ML make a left turn from a straight lane, and a woman in a Focus blow through an occupied crosswalk - both moves define Bellevue, along with the typical glut of phone holding "drivers".

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649
    edited May 2014

    This afternoon, got behind a young woman in a late 90s Civic EX coupe. She'd accelerate very slowly, but eventually get up to speed, where she'd then slowly start veering right, then correct, then go right again. Why would someone do this? Playing with their phone/tablet, of course.

    Also got to sit through a light sequence because a dopey useless CUV (maybe a RAV4) dawdled at a light, so 3 cars got through when maybe 10 were waiting. Probably a phone involved, too. Also saw a couple of crosswalk crowders, one I shouted at as I was in the crosswalk. Enforcement? That's up to "discretion".

  • Steve EliasSteve Elias Posts: 2,207

    thanks, finny.

    us metro/city drivers see texting drivers 10 or 100 times per day.

    we probably need a forum specifically about texting while driving.
    there's gotta be one here on edmunds already, eh? i'll search later...

    but in the meantime, i notice both age and gender bias in my observations of "obvious texting-while-driving". Specifically:

    • It's mostly young drivers who text while driving.
    • It's mostly female drivers who text while driving.

    QUESTION:
    what to do in densepack/stop-and-go traffic when a tailgating texter will not look up, and its unsafe to change lanes due to varying lane-speeds? this specific situation has happened to me twice in recent weeks. both times in the left lane on highway.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,826
    edited May 2014

    @elias said:
    thanks, finny.

    us metro/city drivers see texting drivers 10 or 100 times per day.

    we probably need a forum specifically about texting while driving.
    there's gotta be one here on edmunds already, eh? i'll search later...

    but in the meantime, i notice both age and gender bias in my observations of "obvious texting-while-driving". Specifically:

    • It's mostly young drivers who text while driving.
    • It's mostly female drivers who text while driving.

    QUESTION:
    what to do in densepack/stop-and-go traffic when a tailgating texter will not look up, and its unsafe to change lanes due to varying lane-speeds? this specific situation has happened to me twice in recent weeks. both times in the left lane on highway.

    I'd say ID the texting driver (broader category) sooner, and/ get out from behind them earlier. Or if your ID biases are true, do not get behind a young and/or young and female driver/s, who are (in your view) most likely to be texting (specific to your rating bias/es).

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    I can agree with your texting observations, although the PC police might whine. For plain old phone holders/yappers, it is probably a 50/50 split - but when it comes to actively texting, I notice one group doing it more than others, the same group you mention.

    Regarding the tailgater, maybe hit your hazards or rear fog light if you have one, something to wake them up? Or a quick couple brake taps, not enough to really slow down, just to catch their eye.

    @elias said:
    thanks, finny.

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,345

    As far as I'm concerned, texting while driving should be a felony.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Given the overloaded state of our somewhat misguided incarceration system, I don't know if a felony would work well, but I can support steep fines, and make them progressive.

    Today I saw a woman in a minivan who seemed to be driving a little "off", I think it was simple slowness. She was tending to a little dog - that has to be as bad as yapping or texting.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,826

    Almost anything electronic is getting or already is available for vehicle applications. I think the over all picture is not even close to curbing abuses that lead to distraction accidents. Indeed it would appear the current trajectory is to INCREASE the chances OF distraction accidents.

  • Steve EliasSteve Elias Posts: 2,207
    edited May 2014

    evidently various attempts at statistical sampling lead to the same results about age&gender of the texting drivers.

    thanks fintail re the ideas re how to handle the tailgating texters. i will consider those but would worry about trying either one since tapping brakes unnecessarily is considered a component of a aggressive-driving locally. and driving with flashers active is usually a civil violation unless one is driving below speed limit in which case they are required, iirc. maybe that's the solution, drive 44 mph on highway in right lane, with flashers to alert the texters... .

    public transportation drivers are too-often texting too. (this week, one of them drove her bus halfway off the side of bridge outside boston. bunch of injuries. witnesses reported she was texting.)

  • Steve EliasSteve Elias Posts: 2,207
    edited May 2014

    king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,826
    edited May 2014

    @elias said:
    king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

    The back story, given the so called FAR data

    http://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

    are the BEST safety records (NHTSA), ever since they have been recording these things !!!!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    I'd think a quick couple taps that don't markedly impact speed wouldn't be a problem. Civil violation - who cares. Going 61 in a 60 is also a violation, etc. I don't think even the most militant detached from reality ticket writing professional would chase you down for a 20 second application of hazards. In the long run, the best solution is probably going to be front and rear view cameras to record everything, in the event a settlement is needed.

    There have been incidents of both bus and train drivers causing problems due to distraction. I still say the penalties are too low - give them teeth and actually enforce them (I don't believe for a second what the local law enforcement community claims about tickets given - I seriously want an independent outside audit), and it might have an impact.

    Texting is much more of a danger than simple yapping too, IMO. Both are bad, but not equal.

    @elias said:
    evidently various attempts at statistical sampling lead to the same results about age&gender of the texting drivers.

    thanks fintail re the ideas re how to handle the tailgating texters. i will consider those but would worry about trying either one since tapping brakes unnecessarily is considered a component of a aggressive-driving locally. and driving with flashers active is usually a civil violation unless one is driving below speed limit in which case they are required, iirc. maybe that's the solution, drive 44 mph on highway in right lane, with flashers to alert the texters... .

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Some of those stats seem fishy - as I believe overall accidents are going down even with what must be smartphone market saturation. It's kind of tough. I think stupid incidents that don't necessarily cause accidents are rising - those need to be fought, too. I wouldn't doubt if pedestrian incidents with driver fault are rising, too. Being inconsiderate doesn't only mean crashing.

    @elias said:
    king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

  • fintailfintail Posts: 52,649

    Fun in the morning - saw a woman deal with a crosswalk crowding guy in a rental Altima, saw a woman in a late model Lexus GX take a "free" turn in front of oncoming traffic who had green, got to dodge a couple crosswalk crowders/commercial driveway non-lookers while on foot, and the only cops I saw were hanging around construction sites. Didn't see any texters or yappers.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,946

    Yesterday (Memorial Day) I saw the driver in a black Patriot tap his cigarette out the window several times... then finally toss the butt out the window. Not very patriot-ic, but definitely inconsiderate.

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