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Practicality of EV for 70-mile commute (140 roundtrip)

evnoobevnoob Posts: 39
edited November 2014 in Nissan
Hi all,

I have just started my cars research, I'm planning to move to Florida and live in Orlando, my work will be in Tampa and I will be commuting only twice a week. My commute will be 70 miles not including the return trip, so 140 miles total.

I feel very tempted to lease an EV to save money in my long-distance commute costs, but I'm worried about the range and unpleasant surprises on the road with the batteries.

Nissan LEAF promises up to 80 something mile range, I was thinking I would charge it while at my office, and again when I'm back home. Is that practical? From my research, there are chargepoint stations right next to where I work so I don't think that will be an issue. If not Nissan LEAF, do you recommend other affordable EVs that you think are more suitable to that kind of commute?

Thanks!

Comments

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Unless you can find some kind of 240V charger at work, charging at work on a 110V outlet will not give you enough power to return home. On 110V, you get about 5 miles for every hour of 110V charging. At 8 hours at 220V, you might make it home, just about.

    I'd say you'd be sweating it out both ways.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Since you're in Florida, you'll need to consider the extra load running the AC will have on any EVs range.
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 9,099
    Yea, I test drove a Leaf (just to see what it was like) and even the salesman said that "practical" is only going to be realistic for some owners.

    If I had the disposable income, maybe, but even then it would be as a third vehicle in the household for trips around town. Paying for insurance for a third vehicle would also cut into practical.

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  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 4,098
    evnoob said:

    Hi all,

    I have just started my cars research, I'm planning to move to Florida and live in Orlando, my work will be in Tampa and I will be commuting only twice a week. My commute will be 70 miles not including the return trip, so 140 miles total.

    I feel very tempted to lease an EV to save money in my long-distance commute costs, but I'm worried about the range and unpleasant surprises on the road with the batteries.

    Nissan LEAF promises up to 80 something mile range, I was thinking I would charge it while at my office, and again when I'm back home. Is that practical? From my research, there are chargepoint stations right next to where I work so I don't think that will be an issue. If not Nissan LEAF, do you recommend other affordable EVs that you think are more suitable to that kind of commute?

    Thanks!

    I can't think of an affordable EV with that kind of range. The Tesla has it, but that is hardly "affordable". I believe the new VW EV will have 90 mile range.

    If your employer has a 240 charging station (level II charging), then it might be doable - but even then I would expect the EV range to vary, and to go down somewhat with time.

    I'd suggest a conventional hybrid or a diesel for that kind of commute. If you want EV, try a plug-in. My C-Max energi will do around 20 miles on a charge (but gets only 40 on the highway). The Chevy Volt will do around 40 miles on a charge, and then use the gas engine. Either might be a better choice.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Oh yeah, a Volt would be quite economical. And probably a good deal from the Chevy dealer, a tax credit and an HOV sticker, too!

  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 9,099
    There was someone driving a Volt to the gym I belong to, but they've either quit the gym or gave up the Volt since I haven't seen it in a couple of months. The Volt was not pristine and obviously had been driven a fair amount judging by the appearance of the body, stone chips, etc. I was hoping to run into the owner and get a tour, but it never happened.

    Edmunds Moderator

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  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 4,098

    Oh yeah, a Volt would be quite economical. And probably a good deal from the Chevy dealer, a tax credit and an HOV sticker, too!

    The original 55,000 stickers are already allocated. I know they set up 15000 more, but there seems to be no information on how many have been applied for. That last bunch will be sent to owners in Jan 2015, but you can register for them now.

    It took 3 months for the last "extra" batch of 15000 to be allocated, which means that the new crop of green stickers will likely be gone by the end of December.
  • wheelthingwheelthing MainePosts: 2
    Though historically 110 and 115 volts have been used at different times in the U.S. and Canada, the nominal rms voltage (not to be confused with equipment voltage), as specified by national standards, is 120 VAC with a +/- tolerance of 5%, thus allowing a range of 114 to 126 VAC.

    For calculations and scrutinizing references use 120 VAC as source voltage with fixed frequency of 60 Hz.
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